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Full text of "American Woodworker May-Jun 1994"

A Jig for 



Perfect 

Miters 

HowtoFlisli 
UffiaPro 



The Easy Way 
to Glue up Curves 



Bum a Queen Anne 
Lowboy 



We Rate 21 Popular Saws 



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JUNE 1994 #38 



US, $3 95 CANADA $4 95 




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American 
woodworker 

Issue No. 38 May/June 1994 
Cow Photo by John tame I. 

ftjrt Printed On Recycled Paper 




46 Queen Anne Lowboy Page 28 Gluing Curve* 



Page 36 Dec© N**fri Holder 




Pit* 38 Bandsaw Buyer** Guide 

DEPARTMENTS 

A Word From the Editor a 

Letters 

Dust-Collection Advice A 

Offcuts 

Woodworking Quiz 12 

Q&A 

Buying a Lathe , ...,,„. 

Tech Tips 

Turn-Around Planer 

Wood Facts 

Teak 24 

Just Finishing 

"Rubbing Out" a Finish Ifi 

Tool Box 

Tilting Router Table .84 

Gallery 

Work From Our Readers .....92 

Calendar 

Workshops. Seminars, Etc. 94 

New! Shop Solutions 

Double Duty Sawhorses... „.. 



FEATURES & PROJECTS 

Gluing Up Curves By Peter Korn 

Th p Rabins of R&nt lamination 28 

Resawing on the Band&aw . 31 



A Jig for Perfect Miters By Mario Rodriguez 
Traditional "Miter Jack" Makes ft Easy 



>,.. *aa 



Deco Napkin Holder By Yeung Chan 

Angular Elegance and Handy Storage * .»...„„, £fi 



Buyer's Guide to Bandsaws By Dave Sellers 
Benchtops to Behemoths: The Lowdown on 21 Models 



38 



Tuning a New Bandsaw 



^■■■■■■■■i 



42 



Choosing Bandsaw Blades , - 45 



^ 



Queen Anne Lowboy By Lonnie Bird 
A 1 700s Design With Traditional Styling . 



46 



Challenge V: A Turning Exhibition By Albert LeCoff 

Shaping Turnings on the Lathe and Bevond„..„„„.. , . B 

Multi-Step Finishes By Michael Dresdner 

Add Depth to Your Work With These Pro Techniques , 54 

Three Classic Finishes .„. , 56, 57 & 58 



Bench Hold-Downs By Kevin Ireland 

Securing Workplaces Where Vises and Clamps Can't ,«., 



Seating Made Simple By Simon Watts 

Build This California-Style Chair From Wood and Canvas 



63 



Turning Talc on the Lathe By William E, Sargent 

This Soft Stone Cuts Like Butter and Looks Like Marble 66 

Forests in Crisis By Scott Landis 

How Woodworkers Can Help Save Our Resources 

* 



Timber- Saving Tips 



Closeup on Innovative Forestry .„„..„„„ .„„ 70 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1094 






TOOL TESTS: 

A Behind-the-scenes Peek 



The best tool reviews 

in the business!" we hear 

people say about American 

Woodworker's Buyer's 

Guides. That reputation 

doesn't come easy. Lots of 

thought, planning and 

effort go into making our 

tool tests as thorough and 

objective as we know 

how, Our goal is w give 

you the necessary information to pick 

the right tools and equipment for your 

woodworking needs and budget. 

To give you a glimpse of the tool- 
review process, let's rake a look at 
how the "Buyer's Guide to Handsaws." 
in this issue, came together 

In any test, our editors first draw 
some parameters. For the handsaw 
test, we had to ask: How many band* 
saws are out there? Can we test every 
saw on the market? Shall we focus on 
one type instead? Should it be mid- 
size saws, three-wheelers, bench top 
models, big 20-inchers? 

We finally decided to test several 
sizes and types of handsaws to show 
the broad scope of the market, Then 
we narrowed the field down to 21 
saws — the most we could fit in our 
s hop — and picked a couple machines 
in each size class to make some mean- 
ingful comparisons. Soon the saws 
crowded our loading dock. It took 
Fred Matlack, our Shop Manager, 
more than a week to uncnite them all 
and set them up in the shop. 

Now comes the hard part: establish* 
ing objective criteria for testing, 
Sounds easy, but try defining "accept- 
able" performance in a way you can 




measure. Should bench* 
top saws with humming- 
bird motors compete 

head-to-head with a big 
ih ineher? .Should a $4(M1 

saw be compared point- 
for-point with a similar 
saw that costs three times 
as much? 

After devising our tests 
we finally put the saws to 
work. Day after day of sawing, mea- 
suring, note-taking and discussion fol- 
lowed—a real team effort. 

When the dust settles, we add up 
the test scores. But when all's said and 
done, you can't measure everything. 
We still have to account for the way a 
tool "feeR™ We vote on tills one, and 
factor the votes into our ratings. (Our 
votes represent woodworkers of dif- 
ferent sizes, shapes and abilities, 
including a couple left-handers.) 

We put it all together to make our 
"editors" Choice" award. This is the 
tool Cor tools) we feel are the best of 
the ones we've tested, Our "Best 
Buy" award goes 10 the tool we feel 
offers the best combination of perfor- 
mance and price. 

So, the next time 
; you're shopping for 
tools and equip- 
ment, look for the 
\W -Editors 1 Choice" 
logo. You can buy 
with confidence, 
knowing [hat tool's 
been through the toughest tests in 
the business. 

Ihivid Sloan 
Editor & Publisher 




PLAY IT SAFE 

Woodworking can be dangerous. Safety equipment such as guards, hold- 
downs, goggles, dust masks and hearing protection can greatly reduce your 
risk of injury. But even the best guard won't make up for poor judgment. Use 
common sense and caution in the workshop. If a procedure feels dangerous, 
don't try it, no matter how many other folks work that way. Figure out an alter- 
native that feels safe. Your safety is your responsibility. 



American 
woodworker 



EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING 
OFFICES 

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DESIGN SHOP 

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Fteoi Matiack 



CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 

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Mm hm i Oki^um m 

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ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES 

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CLASSIFIEDS 

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StHi Arr-erican Woodworker in your store, 
risk-tree. Cull <SQO> &45-6Q50 tor details, 



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SUBSCRIPTION PROBLEMS & 
ADDRESS CHANGES 

At AvmRtcw* Woodworker, 

your sritisfnctJon is important to us. 

For questions regarding your subscription 

and all address changes, please write to: 

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P.O. Box 7591 

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Please include a recent mail Ing label 

with oil correspondence. 

Or call (BOO) GSS-3 111 



Aif[i*oh itofli»iM*,Li vliSN iTiOSJIiJ H pubinHd mw Hotm i 

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AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 10O4 



if it were Just a hobby, 
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Item* Shank ascription 



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rdinary router bits give you ordinary 
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fe. 


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Why Should This 
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IMor© Power. You don't 
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S BRIO LIS DO VET AILING requires a serious dovetailing tool- the Leigh 
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will alvvax-s be proud of Like this cool chest in ] " fa cherry shown by justly proud 
Vancourcr furmturu maker Phil Liplon. the Leisji jiR Is a classic. And unlike other 
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coat mo a oh Pfloouet *j«5**«To*i form 



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A Love of Woodworking 

When I was a small bov I was fascinai- 
ed by (he woodworking my grandfa- 
ther did. He nude and repaired intri- 
cate clock cases, window sashes, door 
frames and furniture and he used old- 
time tools like a froe, adz, wooden 
planes, scorps and breast drill. He had 
the patience to explain tools to me 
and how to use them. The two points 
he instilled in me were quality of 
work and appreciation of tools. My 
father repaired and replaced ornate 
woodwork in railway passenger ears 
in the days when most all travel was 
by rail. He taught me all the wood- 
working basics, and like my grandfa- 
ther, he emphasized quality and care 
of tools. 1 now have a son and two 
grandsons who arc avid woodwork- 
ers. When we are together, wood is 
our main topic of conversation. 



Dust-Collection Advice 

If our article on designing a dust col- 
lection system (aw *37) just piqued 
your interest, you can get more in- 
depth information in the booklets. 
Wood Dust Control and Collection 
Systems, available from Delta 
International Machinery' Corp., 
Marketing l)cpt. T 246 Alpha Dr. 
Pittsburgh, PA 15238, (412) 963- 
2400, and Dust Collection Basics, 
available from Grizzly Imports, 1821 
Valencia St, Bcllingham, WA 98226, 
(800)541-5537. 




Woodwork has been most reward- 
ing to me and I know I will never live 
long enough to do all the projects I 
have dreamed up. But, I look forward 
to even' day as another opportunity to 
work with my tools and wood. 

Devore O. Butch 
Fort Worth, TX 

Easy-Lift Collector 

Your article about dust collectors (aw 
*37) says one of the cons of two- 
stage blower-and-hag collectors is 
you have to lift off the bevvy blower 
housing to empty the waste drum, I 
devised a simple, cheap and easily 
used hoist system to separate my 
blower housing from the waste 
drum. This system uses a block-and- 
tackle scheme with one end connect- 
ed to the blower housing and the 
other to a strung ceiling mount. This 
lifter lets me shake debris free by 
making short jerks on the rope 
before raising the blower and it is a 
cinch to realign the blower lid gasket 
with the debris barrel. 

H. Kent Hep worth 
Flagstaff, AZ 

Tuns Oil Nontoxic? 

Re: - Tood-Safc Finishes" (aw *37), 
Michael Dresdner recommends using 
tung oil "for items that will routinely 
come into direct contact with food/ 
But in the Great All-American 
Wooden Toy Book, Norm Marshall 
claims that tung oils arc never nontox- 
ic. Who's right? 

David Sparks 
Martinsville, VA 

Michael Dresdner responds: Pure 
tung oil comes from an edible nut 
and in its pure form is not consid- 
ered toxic Tung oil varnishes that 
contain metallic driers may be more 
dangerous, but even here the 



amount of driers is very small. If 
you're worried about toxicity, avoid 
using tung oils with metal driers. 

Tablesaw Safety 

Re; "A Saw Guard Is Essential" 
("Letters * aw #37)- We often forget a 

machine will grab us the first time we 
let down our guard. It pays to review 
the basic safety rules for each 
machine, even to the point of posting 
them near the machine on a 5x7 card. 
Also, Mr. Prusik can avail himself of 
shop-made safety guards, such as a 
feather board , which may prove bet* 
tcr than the commercially made guard 
that comes with the machine, If you 
make the fcathcrhoard a little thicker 
than necessary and clamp it vertically 
to a fence, it can completely cover the 
blade and function as a guard, 

Donald F. K inn am an 
Phoenix, A2 

Cleanliness Is Next To...? 

Congratulations on your April issue, 
which included photographs of shops 
with real sawdust and wood shavings. 
I've always envied the shop that has a 
place for everything and everything in 
its place. After 50-plus years of enjoy- 
able 'woodworking I find myself own- 
ing a home workshop with a place for 
everything and very little in its 
place— Including sawdust. 

Marcus F. Fcchenback 
Richardson, TX 

Sounds tike our shop, Marcus, We've 
stilt got an M all points bulletin" out 
on a low-angle block plane that got 
swallowed up by the shavings 

Quality Craftsmanship 

Re; "Finding a Future in the Past* (aw 
•37). I was pleased to see that there is 
at least one other person in the world 
who shares my feelings for quality 



TOO BUSY TO WRITE? 

Call our Letterune (610) 967-7776 



AMERICAN WDDPWORKER A JUNE 1994 




a 



Say you've always wanted a 
good band saw. Or you've about 
given up trying to make preci- 
sion cuts with your hand-held 
circular saw. Or perfect holes 
with a portal jU 1 drill. 

Tough to know just where 
to start. Do you go the "big 
buck" route or try one of those 
"cheapo no-names*? 

Tnis'll help, Delta has been 
the choice of professional 
woodworkers for 75 years, 
now. And the tools you're look- 



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ing at are built with the same 
heft and precision we put into 
our professional tools. Yet 
they're priced to fit comfort- 
ably into any shop. 

Whether you're in the mar- 
ket for a bench saw, 1 iai u 1 saw, 
scroll saw or drill press, Delta 
tools are a great place to start. 
Hie scroll saw features our 
Quickset" blade changing sys- 
tem. The band saw, our 
Quickset '"blade tensioning sys- 
tem. So you'll spend more time 
cutting and less time 
messing around with 
blades. And that 12" 
Portable Planer wiU have 
you surfacing vour own 
stock, from 1/8" to 6" 
thick, up to 12" wide. 
In your own shop. 





They're just part of the 
broadesi line in the industry, 
Woodworking toots for the 
master craftsman, the weekend 
do-it-yourselfer and everyone 
in between. 

Delta, If you think it's time 

you got some professional help. 
Call toll free for the name of 
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hardware store Df)|lifED 

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Corrections 

The correct length of the legs in "My Two-by-Four Table 1 
Caw *37) Ls 39 in. f and the top is 8 tn h square. Also, 
there should be 3 I Vin. opening between 
the sub-top raits and the upper 
stretchers. The illustration 
shows how the author 
cut all the parts from a 
single walnut 2x4. 



i 




tM& Y^ 



In the "Arts and Crafts Cabinet" article Caw *32) the antique glass should be 
'•■» by 7% by 12 Si in,, and the top mortises on the side panel should be locat- 
ed 3 m. from the panels top edge. A better lock for this cabinet is *F880B, 
available from Woodworkers Supply of Nevada, 4320 West Bell Dr., Las 
Vegas, NV 891 18, <8(H» 779^745fl. 



craftsmanship. Mr. Hollcnbeck rein* 
forces the theory that even the sim- 
plest balusters ean he individual 
works of an with the help of skilled 
hands. Mysterious "black boxes'* that 
contain all the cold software to create 
Intricate profiles take Che human 
touch out of the process and. in my 
opinion t devalue the final product. 

William D. Conkey 
Bclchertown. MA 

Safety Gaffe 

You illustrate your h Dealing with 
Dust" article {aw »37) with a picture 
of a woodworker operating a jointer 
with his hands on the stock directly 
over the cutterhead. An unexpected 
kickback could throw the stock off 
the machine so the user's hands con- 
tacted die cut tern ead. 

Granted, the instant kickback of 
such a large piece of apparently clear 
stock is unlikely, but you are still 
showing unsafe hand positioning. The 




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OMXCW0 WO«««OyCThFCRM*TOhFO*W 
AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 



1994 




picture detracts from an otherwise 
excellent and much-needed article on 
dust collecting, 

LC. Brickncr 

Engineering & Product l>cvclopmcnt 

Delta International Machinery t:urp. 

Praise far Designer 

Congratulations on "An Approach to 
Design' and "A Tale of Two Tables" 
Caw *36). These arc the most refresh- 
ing, entertaining articles I have seen in 
years. I found great enjoyment in learn- 
ing how Mr. Lay port's designs evolve 
Into a finished piece that matches the 
best use of die available materials with 
the specific needs of the intended use 
and user. I hope you will encourage 
this talented man to keep writing. 

S. Blair Hubbard 
Knoxvilie, MD 

Thanks, Blair, look for Rons article 
on nwktng a secretary desk in an 
upcoming issue. 



Assistant Art Director Wanted 

aw is looking for a full-time designer 
with excellent drawing and designing 
skills and some knowledge of wood- 
working. Must be willing to relocate. 
Send resume to: 

Personnel Department AW-LTE 

Rodale Press Inc. 

33 E* Minor St. 

Emmaus, PA 1809B 



Blades Pass Test 

As an engineer and a huhby-levei 
woodworker I was interested in the 
article on the new "quiet" saw blades 
(aw *34). So I put a Freud 40-tooth 
blade to the test. The cuts were clean 
and sharp and the noise level was a 
hum. With magnification, the pores of 
the wood showed no smearing and 

would need little or no sanding The 
results are amazing. 

Paul W. Fleming 
Sunrise, II. 



Best Saw Guard? 

Re: "Aftermarket Table saw Guards 1 " 
(Afc r *36>. The Biesemeyer and Delta 
Deluxe I milliard [that you recom- 
mend] are fine for protecting the 
Made, hut 1 question their ability to 
protect flesh and bone. The Brett- 
Guard, while requiring some effort to 
install, provides superior protection 
for users during virtually all table saw 
operations. It is the only guard used 
for training at the Occupational Safety 
and Health Administration's Machine 
Guard Training Facility. 

Ben Jones 
Vandalia, OH 

WHAT'S ON YOUR MIND? 

We value your comments, complaints 
and corrections. Send your letters to: 
"Editors American Woodworker, 33 E. 
Minor 5u Emmaus. PA 1S098. or tele- 
phone your message to us at 610-967- 
7776. FAX: (610) 967-8956, 



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AMtRlC^N WOODWORKEn * JUNE 1994 



1 1 










• IP 



YOUR Wi 
WORKING 
KNOW-HOW 



Think you know the ins and 
outs of woodworking? Try your 
hand at this quiz, then send 
your answers to us. The first 
tetter we open with 10 correct 
answers gets a $100 check: 
second $50 and third $25, 
Write: "Offcuts," American 
Woodworker , 33 E< Minor St., 
Emmaus. PA 18098. 

1. If you were hand- planing 
the surface of this board 
along its length, which way 
would you push the plane? 




2. What does this symbol 
mean when written on a 
board? 




uj»t rufxriUiH 



3. When would you be most 
likely to use an oval-headed 
wood screw? 

4. What types of fires would 
you put out with an ABC fire 
extinguisher? 

5. As it dries, Is a green 
board more likely to cup away 
from the center of the tree, or 
toward it? 

6- What government organi- 
zation can supply Information 
on commercially available 
timbers? 

7* What tool was used in 
Colonial times for removing 
the bark from trees before 
hand-hewing? 

8. What is a jack plane, and 
how did it get its name? 

9. What is a Scfmltzefoanfft 

10. How are sharks and 

woodworking related? 




BIGGEST IVORY OUT OF AFRICA 

o, we don't mean elephant 
tusks. Wayne Knuteson, propri- 
etor of the One Good Turn turning 
supply store in Murray, Utah, bought 
what may be the biggest hunk of pink 
ivory wood ever to come out of 
South Africa. The wood is very hard, 
heavy and prone to splitting, but its 
fine, even grain and unusual color 
make it great for turning, 

knuteson\s log, at left, 
was 10 ft. long, weighed 
2,308 pounds with [he J 
bark off and was 25 In. In 
dia.— a rare size for [his 
species, 

Knuteson got the log from 
an English wood broker who 
had purchased it from a 
veneer buyer in France. The wood originally came from a South African planta- 
tion. Since Knuteson bought it, he's sold pieces to turners in Alaska, Hawaii, 
Utah and Michigan. At right is a goblet turned by John Crttchfield from this same 
log. Sec page 53 for another turning, by Frank Cummings 111, from this log. 




KnutesOfTs gigan ti c pink Ivory log rests on a flatbed 
trailer In Utah. Helper John Arserteau looks on* 




JOHNCBIfcwiLD 



■ ■»■■■!■■■■■■ ■■•■*>•■■?■"■■• ■■M«M«*"« 



SCIENCE AMD 
WOODWORKING DO MIX 



> 

i 



I 



At a time when schools 
and colleges around 
the country are dropping 
their woodworking pro- 
grams, a New York City 
high school that's best 
known for its high-tech wiz- 
ardry is investing heavily in 
the craft. 

In [he las[ two years, 
Stuyvesant High School, 
known nationwide for the 
top-notch science students it 
produces, has invested mil- 
lions of dollars in state-of- 
the-art wood working equip- 
ment for its shop. The 90- 
year-old high schools mis- 
sion has always been to 
combine superior academics 
with industrial education. 
So, it was natural for the 
school to continue its com- 
mitment to woodworking 



when it built a new building 
in 1992, 

In keeping with the 
school's past, woodworking 
at Stuyvesant is part of the 
technology department. But 
course offerings enable stu- 
dents to get a good founda- 
tion in traditional building 
and design skills: One 
advanced class is making 
oak clocks for a term pro- 
ject. Experienced wood- 
workers can also pursue 
highly individualized and 
experimental projects, and 
the school encourages them 
to use their skills in other 
courses. For instance, sci- 
ence students have made 
wooden whistles to explore 
the properties of wind, 

Stuyvesant^ shop attracts 
about 200 students yearly. 



■ ■■■«■■■■■ IIMIII IILIllBlll.aiJIll*!! ll>ll.l..>I.^IJItl.l-,IL,l- 

DREAM SHOP 
WINNER 

Robert St*ffen T a retired 

machinist from Wisconsin, is 
the winner of the second 
American Woodworker/ Delta 
International $5 H 000 Dream 
Workshop Sweepstakes, 
Steffen, who coincidental ly 
was notified on his birthday 
that he + d won, enjoys mak- 
ing toys and dol (house furni- 
ture as well as full-size furni- 
ture. As this years winner 
he has been invited to the 
AW workshop for a visit after 
he picks out $5,000 worth of 
Delta tools and equipment 
for his shop. 

A new Dream Workshop 
Sweepstakes started on 
January 1st, The next winner 
will be chosen on December 
31. 1994. 






i a 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1 a & 4 



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AMERICAN WOODWORKER! A JUNE 199-3 13 



WOODWORKING TEACHERS 

The Boys & Girls Clubs of 
America need volunteers to 
teach underprivileged children 
basic woodworking skills. 
Volunteers will help the young 
people complete simple craft 
and carpentry projects, and 
according to Tom Smart, assis- 
tant director of program ser- 
vices, the courses will be 
taught at club locations around 
the nation. tf you are willing to 
share some of your time and 
skills, please write to; Tom 
Smart, Boys & Girls Clubs of 
America, 1230 Peachtree St 
NW t Atlanta, GA 30309, or 
call: (404) 815-5700. 



BATTLE FOR THE BUTTERNUT 




oodworkcrs who 
use huttcmut may 
be in fur a rude awakening 
in the near future. This soft- 
er relative of walnut, a 



i 




At left Is the canker as it 
appears on bark In the 
spring; at right Is the dam- 
age beneath the bark. 

favorite of woodcarvcrs, is 
in serious danger from a 
fungus. Scientists say but* 
temut could soon become 
an endangered species in 
the eastern U,S., and lum- 



ber prices may be affected. 

The feisty fungus is com- 
monly c ailed butternut 
canker disease, it causes 
cankers on the trunk which 
close off food and water 
supplies, killing the tree. 

The entire growing range 
of the butternut— from 
Minnesota to Maine, to 
Tennessee and Arkansas — 
has been hard-hit by the 
fungus. In fact, the United 
Suites Department of 
Agriculture' s Forest Service 
data show that the number 
of butternut trees has 
declined by 84 percent in 
some parts of the Great 
Lakes states over the past 
decade and a half. 

But USDA scientists think 
they have found a way to 
fight the spread of the dis- 



U14ffl*III + l-1l»fl«'l¥l*IPI14»M'«>»lf1*'P'tllll«l'*lf-1VB 





I 



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FIXING USES CARS, 
A PIECE AT A TIME 

ill Cartwriglu is intimate with die u*ed-car 
business, but you won't sec him in a plaid 
polyester sport jacket. His connection is through 
the liigh-quality wooden car parts he reproduces 
for antique cars, 

Cartwrighfs business, KC Wood Manufacturing 
in Greensboro, North Carolina, specializes in mid- 
19205 to mid-1950s GM cars. While original parts 
were made from various hardwoods, Cartwright 
works with kiln-dried ash, because it can take 
many nails without splitting. In a completed car T 
the body panels may be nailed onto the wooden 
parts with as many as I ,(XX) "cigapbox" nails, 

Cartwright began his woodworking career by 
apprenticing as a partem maker in the furniture 
industry. Somewhere along the line, he met a co- 
worker who made: Ford parts, and Cartwright got 
interested in antique cars. The rest, as they say, is 
history — or a remarkable facsimile thereof! 

Hundreds of wooden pieces like these must fit 
precisely together In every single car- Outside right 
and left are a pair of window sills; In the middle 
are a pair of hinge pilLars and a door regulator 
board. Above are two windshield headers. 



i 

! 



i 




A healthy butternut tree, 

ease. They are cloning but- 
ternut trees that seem to be 
naturally fungus-resistant. 

Finding healthy trees for 
this research is difficult and 
time consuming, and 
researchers can use your 
help. If you have butternuts 
growing on your property 
and would like to learn 
more, write to: Forest 
Disease Project, USDA 
Forest Service, 1992 Folwell 
Ave, t St. Paul, MN 55108, 

PII«»MH»*I*IV Pl*IM*PlllPlVI*l-tl*'MVtFI¥«*ll-ll HVFMTPH I4I»F 




I 

h-t 

\ 



I 



I" 



INSOMNIAC'S 

WORST 
NIGHTMARE 

The builder of this bed said It 
best: "I've heard of tossing and 
turning m your sleep, but this is 
ridiculous!" Craig Kassan of 
Jacksonville, Florida, buift this 
queen-sized original from red 
oak and curly cherry. Partialfy 
exposed mortise-and-tenon 
joinery accents the frame, and 
the visible sides of the side 
rails are twisted to match the 
contrasting angles of head- and 
footboard, 

Offcuis contributors: 
Susannah Hogendom, Anoy Haa t 
Simon Warts 



14 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



o0 l)CTI 0/V 

o 

£ HAND'CARVEDOAK'CINCERBREAD' fn 

Oidcit 0*to* Hii**<k[di * Ouvfriry Duccuvn AvuUble 
Ca II o it *fc t r lo* FREE CAULOG 

piastre's pJnofrs, ^itc- 

1 ,000, 5 UO-U I I 8 ( CT ONly) FAX (20 1 ) ?4 ?*0 76 9 

J9 N. Ptu w MtMRuJ Rd„ Dtp*, AW» WdtrnqToid, CT 0649? 




cf.cl r mo « oh wcoucr HPawmm tonm 




AIRMATE 3 — $329 

Stephen H. Btenk npromjnendj J i/sm 
( At A/nnif* 3 tor wood t timing, 

Exedlent f« ill wood fuming And 

other woodworking Jobf wtilch 

crant* eust. 

■Filers Oust -S cu ft airflow- -Light -w&Jghf 
■Fiftraiton system on belt pack: hose brings tittered air to tieadpiece. 
•Accommodates glasses & beards. 'Available for sama day shipment 
- S«e arUcte on du$t neinwi $ m dfniwican woodwrke/ (Aug '99, pg 24) — 
Now Available • New "AlflLITE'" 
aflfc Manufactured by Racat Heafttr and Safety. 
Y ™ Call for FREE information & special prices. 



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Accepted 



AIRSTREAM DUST HELMETS 

PO Box 975 • Elbow Lake, MN 56531 
TOLL FREE 1 -BOO-328-1 792 • 21S-6fl^4457 



CRC1ENQ TeC^fflOOUCTWOfllAltnCNPCHW 



DISCOUNT PRICES ON BOOKS & VIDEOS 



Ca II Toll Free 1 -800-2 43-4)7 13 M a n tl V ' S 
N o shipp tng chargers in U S * r 

□n orders over $35 others add S3 X\J ( H ) I 

Canada a Overseas add 1 5% I ^ \\ucy \ 

S2 Catalog 606.255-5444, 555 S. Broadway. Lexington. Ky 40508 



NEW for 1994 



WOODTURNING 



Dauu* White Teaches 

WiM-dm rniri|>: set of 6 videos 

(about 90 min. tuch) 

S3»fntoil6forSZ1000 
The Practice of Woodturning 

by Mike Dufaw Sei of 3 

videos (2 hi each ) $38 each 
Thr Lathe Book i Cdhov .-: ■ $24 
Turning & MnhunkaJ 

Manipulation Volume Two 

(Holtnpffcl) $22 
OnuuneniaJ Tumhig(EvRm) $22 

BnromJ Bask Turning} 
QlT-Cenire. Cooperated and 
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Plenum and Profit From 
WoodlorninK (Shcrwjn) $20 



WOOOCARViNG 



RJnfcnrPwf (Schob.) S55 
Kantfamtnlais or Figure 

Caning (Norbury) $29 



WORKSHOP 



Tht Workshop (Kingiihott) $2(1 
The Home Worfcihop Manner 

from "Wood" $24 
The Next Step: The Professional 

Woodworking Shop 

(McPhersun) $29 
Guide to Salting lip Your Shop 

from "Wood" $12 
The Workshop Book <Landis> $30 



ROUTER 



Woodworking with the Rooter 

(Hyhon) $27 
The Nf m Router Handbook 

(Spiel man) $1 ft 
Videos by Ro B erC|j(Te: 

Router Duct Basics $34) 

Router Drawer Basics $30 
The Router (RosciwiahlJrrweaS 15 



HANDTOOLS 



The Wooden Plane: 

Itaiory, Form and Function 

(Whclan) $39 
American Machinist'* Tools: 

Directory of Patents $31 



PROJECTS 



The Book or Bo*es (Crawford) $25 
Making Little Boxes (Bcnneii) $12 
Art of Making Elegant Boars 

(T^'dealc) $1* 
Intra jig Projects ^Techniques 

(McDanicI) $1* 
Making Board , Peg and Din 

Games (Loader) $17 



WOOD MAGAZINE BOOKS 



$12 ca; any 4 for $45 
1 * Cirv i ng T* chniques 2Turoi rig. 
Techniques X Rou lei Techniques 
4 + Kid's Projects 5 T Favorite Toys 
6 + Woodcrafteii Gift* 
7* Mnbhing Technique* 
8* C1t«ic Woodworking Woods 



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Here's What The RBI K12 Can Do For Von, 

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This Is What You Can Do With The RBI 812, 

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or Your FR 






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DIITB 






CfiCLE WO Ml ON PRODUCT Hf&HiXlUjH t OHM 



cnai no ft oh product f*cnMrihON fobm 

AMERICAN WOODWDWKCn A JUNE 1994 



1 5 




© 



Buying Your First Lathe 

The turning bug bit mc when 1 
spent an evening watching my 
neighbor work at the lathe, rd tike to 
buy a lathe, but I'm bewildered by the 
different sizes, brands and prices. Can 
you give me some advice about buy- 
ing a first lathe and accessories? 

Paul Durke 
Wobum, MA 

©First, I suggest you look for a big, 
variahic-spced (as opposed to 
stepped -pulky) lathe with lots nf cast 
iron. A heavy lathe is less prone to 
vibration, and it T s faster and easier to 
change; sjx.-cds on a variable-speed Lame 
since vou don T t liave to move the drive 
belt from pulley to pulley by hand. 

After this, look for versatility; The 
maximum distance between the head- 
stock and tailstock will reflect the 
longest spindle you can turn. The 



height from the bed to the drive spur 
will be the maximum radius of a bowl 
that you can turn over the bed. 
(Manufacturers refer to the * swing" of 
a lathe, which Is the largest diameter 
that the lathe can handle. ) Some of the 
newer entry-level lathes have head- 
stocks that rotate, allowing you to turn 
larger pieces off the bed of the lathe. 

Next, look for a heads tock with a 
common Morse taper and common 
spindle size so it will accept aftermar- 
ket gadgets like chucks. The most 
common Morse taper is a *2; spindles 
vary quite a bit in size and threads per 
inch, hut you can check the Craft 
Supply catalog (1287 E. 1120 S. t 
Provo, UT 84601, 801-373-0917) to 
sec the basic ones. And don't forget to 
shop for power: A ^-HP motor is a 
minimum for a Lathe. 

Expect to pay at least $500 for a 
decent new machine. However, don't 



overlook the want ads; Sometimes a 
real bargain comes up if you know 
what you're looking for. 

Accessories should include a good 
set of hlgh-s peed-steel turning chisels. 
Also, a set of calipers will help you 
duplicate diameters whether you're 
turning spindles or bowls, If the lathe 
doesn't come with one, I advise buy- 
ing a live center for your tailstock. 
And a face shield is a must for safety. 

Steve Blenk 

Teacher and turner 

Sequim, WA 

No-Drip Shellac 

©I want the warm look of a shel- 
lac finish on my mahogany wall. 
How can I apply it without getting 
runs and sags, and what kind of shel- 
lac should I use? 

Larry Davis 
Lacombe, LA 



Headboard Joints 

©I'm making a traditional four- 
poster bed, and I'm concerned 
that the wide headboard will eventu- 
ally split across the grain if I glue it 
into die mortises in tile posts Can I 
lessen the chances of splitting by 
making two narrow tenons with the 
area in between cut out? 

Kristen Fuller 
Budds Creek, MD 

©Narrow tenons won't solve the 
problem, because they'll still 
be part of a large board that is sus- 
ceptible to wood movement. Your 
best bet is to entirely avoid the cross- 
grain gluing problem by joining the 
headboard to the posts without glue. 
This is tlic way many Colonial poster 
beds were made, and furniture mak- 
ers would hold a bed together by 
bolting the bed rails to the posts. 

Typically, on a bed with straight' 
tapered posts, the tenon would be the 
full width of the headboard, and it 
would fit into a mortise that was 
slightly longer than the tenon was 



wide, (See drawing.) This would allow 
the headboard to expand at the 
wettest times of the year. A shoulder 
at the top of the tenon kept the mor- 
tise from showing as the headboard 
shrank in width during the dry season. 

Narrow tenons and the cutout vou 
describe were used on four-poster 
beds to minimize the length of the 
mortise in the post, and thereby add 
strength to boldly turned posts. 

If you use cutouts on your head- 



board, make the top tenon the full 
width of the top mortise. Leave room 
in the lower mortise so the bottom 
tenon can move freely, thus prevent- 
ing the headboard from binding, Qld- 
tlme furniture makers often located 
the lower mortise in line with the 
mattress. This way, any gaps were 
hidden by the mattress and pillows. 

Mack Headley 

Cabinetmaker 

Williamsburg, VA 



t~ 



HEADBOARD I0INT5 
HEADBOARD WITH SINGLE TENON HEADBOARD WITH DOUBLE TENONS 



Lmvs room 
in mortise 
for tenon 
to move. 




STRAIGHT-- 
TAPER POST 



Cut shoulder to 
avoid exposing 
mortise. I 



<_^ 



? 



Leave room in 
lower mortise 
for tenon 
to move. 



TURNED 
POST 




Cut shoulder to 
avoid exposing 
mortJtt. L 

Place mortise bottom 

At mattress level 
to hide any gap. 



V 



} 



16 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1094 



AIRMMQSI* . AWGffc 
BASS«OOD-erFC» ■!*> 

C*|F«tN OttWWF 

LBOlHO-tLll-fIA 

CWtNHf IflT . HCKQflT 
MOLL t - rti&Lia ■ *P£ ■ "0* 

LicnuyMTftf -im* 

VJMSCMJ -IUKES 

P#LD*0 - KAflnOOO 

POPLAR -WmillMWflT 

PQ«HO0m'B*«lt 

SITU SARIS . SVCfcWRCS 

TEM-Mfp-wAmn 

t«HG£ ZtBPUJACOTE 



CaW Condon first for 

♦ LUMBER * PLYWOOD - MOULDINGS 

^CUSTOM MILLWORK -VENEERS ...and more! 

ill connon 



>AN¥ I no, 

Whim Pljln*. NY * SlormvUle. NY 

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OThe key to a tfrip-frcx shellac fin- 
ish is to avoid putting too much 

on at once. You can control shellac by 
brushing or wiping on multiple thin 
coats, and by thinning the finish so it 
dries so quickly it doesn't have time 
to sag on a vertical surface. 

I suggest you buy your shellac in 
flake form and mix it with denatured 
alcohol to ensure it's fresh. Start with 
a 2-pound cut (2 pounds of shellac to 
a gallon of alcohol), then experiment 
to get the right viscosity: If you still 
get sagging, add more alcohol; for a 
quicker build, add more flakes. 



Whether you use orange shellac or a 
lighter-colored, blonde shellac is 
strictly a matter of taste, but avoid 
bleached "white" shellac because its 
hygroscopic (water-retaining) nature 
makes it less durable. 

Shellac wont bold up in high heat 
(above 120° F), so if the woodwork is 
close to a heat source such as a fire- 
place , you'd be hcttcr off using an oil- 
based varnish instead of shellac to get 
the warm tones you're after. 

Michael Uresdner 

Finishing consultant 

Nazareth, PA 



WHERE TO FIND IT 
[Natural dyes, mordants and various grades of shellac are available from 
Olde Mill Cabinet Shoppe, 1660 Camp Betty Washington Rd„ York. PA 
17402, (717) 75S-8H84, 

Lamp- making supplies are available from The Lamp Shop, Box 3606. 
Concord. NH 03302. (Mtf) 224-1603. 

Void-free Baltic birch plywood is available from Boulter Plywood. 24 
Broadway, SomcrviHc. MA 021 n. (6D 666- 1 MO. 



Repairing Loose Veneer 

©1 just inherited an antique table 
that is veneered with mahogany. 
The veneer on the top is in very good 
shape except for some chips and 
cracks near the edges. Is there some 
way 10 repair the top without replac- 
ing all the veneer? 

Kerry Gordon 
Toronto, Canada 

ORe- veneering the entire table Lop is 
a Last resort and should be avoid- 
ed — you risk destroying the historical 
value of the antique. Instead, there arc 
two basic conservation techniques that 
will improve the condition of the piece 
and prevent further deterioration. 

To repair small cracks, first clean 
them with a stencil knife or other 
small, sharp knife to remove debris and 
loose glue. Then fill the cracks slightly 
proud by melting in a single flake of 
shellac or an appropriately colored 
burn-in stick (available from Garrett 



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Wade, 161 Ave. of the Americas, New 
York, NY 10013, 800-221-2942). After 
the filter is hard (a few minutes is all it 
takes), level any bumps with a scraper 
and sonic 220-grit sandpaper. 

For big cracks and chips. you + U need 
to pi «e a veneer patch into the dam- 
aged area. First scrape the area clean 
with a knife or sharp chisel then pick a 
piece of veneer that matches the color 
and grain of the top as closely as possi- 
ble. Fit the patch to the chipped area 
with a knife or chisel, cutting matcliing 
bevels on the cross-grain edges of the 
patch and the damaged area of the 
tablctop to make a scarf joint. 

Use hot hide glue to attach the 
patch, coloring the glue with water- 
soluble aniline dyes if you suspect the 
glue lines will show. (The reversible 
nature of hide glue allows you to 
remove the patch with heat and mois- 
ture if you don't like the results. ) 
Clamp the patch under a block of 
wood until the glue dries, then scrape 



and sand the repair until it's flush 
with the surrounding area. 

Once all the repairs are leveled, you 
can dab on some stain to get them 
close to the color of the rest of the 
table. However, for a final color 
match, you should mix aniline dyes or 
powdered pigments with shellac and 
lightly pad the repaired area. 

Lance Patterson 

Furniture instructor 

Boston, MA 

Setting a Shoulder-Plane Iron 

©I read somewhere that the side 
of a shoulder-plane iron should 
extend just a little beyond the side of 
the plane body. Is this true, and if so, 
what's the reason? 

Mike GToolc 
Woodstock, NY 

OHow you set the blade in your 
shoulder plane depends upon 
the fob. When cleaning up tenons, 



keep the iron flush to the plane's side. 
This way t the side registers against the 
cheeks as you flatten the shoulders, 
and against the shoulders as you fit 
the cheeks. This keeps cheeks and 
shoulders square to each other. 

The reason for extending the iron 
slightly beyond the side of the plane 
becomes apparent when you need to 
plane up to surfaces that intersect at 
an angle greater than 90*\ such as 
where the bevel of a raised panel 
meets the tongue. The extended blude 
will cut to the intersection without the 
body of the plane gouging the tongue. 

Peter Korn 
Furniture maker and teacher 

Rockland. MB 

Got a woodworking question for the 
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Woodworker, 33 E, Minor St., 
Em ma us, PA ItfOVH, or phone your 
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£ lu*Lng date for July/August issue is 4f 1 3/94. 

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ONEIDA AIR SYSTEMS 




Cyclones 



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Dust Collection Systems 
Filter Bags 

High efficiency filter material 

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BAND SAW BLADES 



Electro Heat 

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Hardened 

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BJ'Meial - M-2'M<42 



Rex & Hard Back - PC: Series | 
AS: Series: Veneer Bands 



TIMBER WOLF BANDS 



HIGH PERFORMANCE PALLET A BAM3 MILL BLADE^I 



SJFF0U4 Of|n 9M QAHfQ 12Wi«f*Ffc«nuf h 
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AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 



31 



Sand- IRcte 

Pneumatic Drum/Brush Head Sander 


**^fL— — J ■ ^ 


- 




^^ " ^^^ 


M*0* in USA 


Gillespie Paddles 

l Just unfit to iKnm in i few quick wards- hen* rp^ntirft ibe use of trw 
Suud-Rite equipmenl. ijmi ilKalry the pneiintntit: drains. 1 txiu^ht my 
basil 1 michini'r, jtumit M\ yeaA a|Qtr, and if s still *itn me, tn usr, evtry- 
duy. Sinn.' a ranoe paddle is basically a eunluifml instrument, it's 
utauhitefy essential lo havetquJiHiirit itiai will runi kave liAnhedfi^ 
wkn sanding, whit h &rr<iur*r flit, fun! sandem will do. Thais gmt 
for boards, bul not Tor paddle. ] haw a variety of drum sue* that 1 use 
for smalirr and larger radium, as well as Uie flat of the htauin surfAee. 

Wrll, I dmi't waul lo be Uni >4»fipy hm, hit 1 hijtfiry fWOfflmend tlMfl? 
drums for ;tny ron|min b d wnrfc. h'n a IwHuna kn easier and quicker. 

Brad GiEksirie 




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R « y 'TO. 95 

FORSTNER BITS- cm™**m 

For Perfect Holes Forstner bits are designed 
to drill flat bottom or through holes cleanly in 
end grain, thin stock, veneers and regular stock. 

This fine 16-piece set comes in its own 
attractive wood box and includes the 
following sizes: 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", 5/8", 3/4", 

7/8", 1", 1 1/8", 1 1/4", 1 3/8", 1 1/2", 1 5/8", 1 3/4", 
1 7/8", 2" and 2 1/8". FREE CATALOG. 



To Ofrt*f by Mi*J«C!wptt. Yias, or [>.icew»f Qmi Tpl 
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AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



CfCLE HO » Ol mOOUCT l*Cm«T Oh FOfW 
A JUNE 1994 










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6" JOINTER A 



•1HP.U0/TW. 

*t>otoi 

REG. -S3 75.00 



$345.00 




8" HEAVY 
DUTY JOINTER 4 



•ll/JrLP^fflK 
•45" IfD LBtSTi 

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REG : $650.00 



$640,00 




2 H.P. DUST 
COLLECTOR ► 



»U5fUIL 
•EN-DC20 

BEG $285 00 
SKOAL: 

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12" PLANER 



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aKTH.DJABU SAW 

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15" PLANER ► 

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10" SUPER H.D. TILTING 
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SLIDING TABLE 
WOOD 5HAPER 

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SKOAL 






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TECH TIPS 



Make Your Own Dowels 

The next time you need a dowel pin 
in some unusual hardwood, try mak- 
ing your own. First drill a hole the 
same size as the dowel in a piece of ] , ■• 
in. steel plate, leaving the rough edges 




of the hole intact. Then, whittle a 
piece of wood to the approximate 
size and shape of the dowel pin. Place 
the plate on blocks (with the burr 
around the drilled hole facing up) and 
drive the wood through with a ham- 
mer. You can drill holes for several 
sizes of dowels in one plate, but you 11 
need to use heavier-gauge metal as the 
size of the dowel increases. 

Danny E* rum fie Id 
Lepage. MTV 

After the Fruitcake 

Don't throw that cake tin out! Cut in 
half and mounted on the wall, it 
makes an ideal holder for sanding 
discs, I color-code the tins — red and 
blue— so I know which holds the fine 
disks and which the coarse. 

Howard Moody 
Upper Jay T NY 







Cheap Source for Beeswax 

The beeswax you find in a toilet-bowl 
seal is excellent as a lubricant in the 
shop, Sold in hardware stores, toilet- 
bowl seals come in the shape of a 
large doughnut, so when I buy one I 
warm it, then re-form it in a tin can or 
small wooden box for storage. 
Beeswax is especially useful for lubri- 
cating screws, because it doesn't stain 
the wood. 

Robert Behm 
New Wilmington, PA 



BEST TIP 

Cbmk leDoitx. of ffeppner, OR. uitts 

$200 for this tabor-stiriug tip, judged 
by our editors as twst of the issue, For 
details tm bow you can win C€tsb for 
your favorite workshop tips, see the 
box on page 26. 







Wooden peg locks 
rotating planer 

taUle in place. 



Turn-Around Planer 

To make the best use of shop 
space, I mounted my portable plan- 
er under mv bench and installed 
rollers at each end of the bench so I 
could plane long boards without 
moving the machine. This worked 
well, but it still meant I needed to 
carry all the stock from the out feed 

side to the in feed when making sev- 
eral passes. One day 1 got smart and 
mounted the planer on a piece of 
plywood with a "lazy Susan'* under- 
neath. Wouden pegs keep it locked 
in position. Now all I have to do is 
pull the pins and rotate the planer 
180° for the second pass. 



Taming the Power Cords 

Do the cords of your power tools look 
like a rat's nest? Try taming them with 
twin-bead ponytailers. These are 
braided elastic hair bands with a small 
ball at each end. Just fold the cable in 




half, then in half again until you have 
the size you want. Wrap the ponytail- 
er around the cord and slip the ball 
through the loop. Ponytailers come in 
various sizes and can be found in the 
cosmetics department along with 
other hair accessories. 

Charles Dilks 

Richland, wa 

Reciprocating File 

In these days of the scroll saw revolu- 
tion, flea markets are chock full of 
old-style cast-iron jigsaws, I bought 
one recently and converted it to a 
reciprocating filing machine, I first 
cut off the upper arm, and then I 
made an adaptor which held the file 
in place and fit over the jigsaw blade 
holder, 1 also changed the pulleys and 



! \ Cut off arm ^ 1 

\ and discard. 




found that a Hn.-dia. pulley driving a 
6-in.-dia. pulley will give the right fil- 
ing speed, when driven by a 1,725- 
rpm motor. 

Ron Pavelka 

Orange, CA 



34 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 19 9 4 



KLINGSPORS SANDING CATALOGUE 



how does a major manufacturer 

Of abrasives affect The 
woodworking hobbyist? 

Of How Does A Simple Idea Grow Into A Catalog? 



Klingspor's Sanding Catalogue 
came about in earlv 1%9. 
Having manufactured the llighest 
quality abrasives since 1893. 
KHngspor Abrasives found a way to 
offer [lie woodworking hobbyist die 
same products the largest furniture 
manufacturers in the world use — truly 
industrial grade materials, 

A simple "Bargain Box n got the 
whole idea in motion. Twenty 
pounds of .sanding materials left over 
from our automated manufacturing 
systems were packed into a box and 
sold at the unbelievable price of only 
$29*00 (plus $3*50 shipping and 
handling)! Some of the more daring 
wood workers out there, not knowing 
what they were getting into, gave this 
deal a try. in no time, the word was 
getting out that no oilier sanding 
materials compared to 

the ones 



$29 Bargain Box 

Cb(*!$i l any combitsaiioti of coarse, 
medium or fine grit 

offered in the Bargain Box. One thing 
lead to another and a small catalog 
was born. Most of you have probably 
.seen, heard of or even ordered from 



Kling$por*$ Sanding Catalogue 

over the years and the good news is 
the Bargain Box is still available. You 
simply cannot get a better deal any- 
where— you choose the grits you 
want in any combination of Ooxirsc. 
M= medium or F"Fine* 





$29 Box of Belts 

3**24*. 4*x2Pmd4*x24' { 



Then to further the story, 
Klingspor's Sanding Catalogue 
developed another * Bargain" to show 
you, the woodworker, the quality of 
the materials offered and to entice 
you in order and get the value you 
deserve from your sanding products, 
What came about next rocked the 
whole woodworking industry — the 
"Box of Belts". How could a mail- 
order company possibly sell 3u sand- 
ing belts for only $29-00 f plus $3-50 
shipping and handling)? Thai's only 
S. 80 per bell — totally - unheard of! The 
most common portable belt sizes are 



offered: 2^ H x 16\ 5* s 18", 3" x 21 " t 
3' x 24'\ 4" x 21* and 4" x 24" (the 4 n 
wide belts have 30 per box) and the 
best part is you choose l lie grity Extra 
coarse, coarse, medium, medium-fine. 
Fine and extra -line grits make this a 
no-lose situation, There are six belts 
in each grit pack (five in the 4" wide 
belts); you choose six of die packs in 
any combination and you've got your 
Box of Belts, 

If you haven't tried Klingspor's 
Sanding products, order one of die 
bargains and get the value you 
deserve, Or if vou'd rather see the 
entire catalog, simply mail the 
postage-paid card below for a 
free 1 year subscription, 

ORDER TODAY! 

1-800-228-0000 




So T see for yourself; prompt deliv- 
ery, excellent service and guaranteed 
The Most Sanding Power For Your 
Money! ^^ 

n 

Klingspor's Sanding Catalogue 
Hickory, NC 286035737 






'Quality Sanding Products for the Professional 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



1 JUNE 1994 25 



TE 



ij li 



D 



s 



Instant Dowel Centers 

For a quick doweling job, I drive a 
finish nail about halfway into the 
wood wherever I want a dowel. I clip 




the head off, so only about '/» in, is 
left sticking out, and I press the mat- 
ing piece firmly against the nails. 
Then I pull the nails and drill holes 
with a brad-point hit at all the points 
marked. Unlike when using dowel 
centers, you can use this technique 
for any size of dowel. 

Martin Gross 
Marlin t WA 

Shaping Thin Stock 

Shaping thin stock, such as picture- 
frame molding, on a router table can 
be awkward. It's easy to roll or lift ihe 
work, affecting the cul, and one's fin- 
gers arc perilously close io the cutter. 
My solution is to attach an outrigger 
to the workpiecc with hot-melt glue. 1 
cut away the lower edge of the sup- 
ports as shown so they'll clear the 




bit's pilot bearing. Then I can rout 
both sides of a workpiecc with per- 
fect safety. 

Dale Fritz 
Cypress, TX 

Punching Copper 

I recently made a pie safe for my wife, 

and of course she wanted the doors 
decorated with punched copper pan- 
els in traditional fashion. Punching 
four large panels, all by hand, was 
going to take time, so I used my drill 
press. I took the handle off an ice 
pick, chucked the steel needle in the 



drill chuck and set the copper sheet, 
backed with plywood, on the table 
underneath. By setting the drill press 
depth stop I could get a consistent 
hole in the copper sheet every time. 
With the drill press running, it was 
easy to withdraw the ice pick. 

John Eiler 
Kivcrdalc, GA 

Turning; the Tables 

Here's a good way to support a panel 
or door while finishing Put one nail 
In one end of the panel and two nails 
in the other end so it can't rock. 




When you've applied finish to one 
side, turn the panel over by lifting the 
end with the two nails and pivoting 
the panel on the single nail on the 
other end. Once your finish is in 
place, leave the panel on the 
sawhorse to dry, 

Carl Dorsch 
Pittsburgh, PA 

Boring the Odd Hole 

I often need to drill odd-sized holes 
for which I don't have a standard bit. 
So, 1 make my own from spade hits. 
For example, recently I wanted a hole 
to fit i^-in. electrical conduit. Since 
the pipe was a fraction over u At in., I 
started with a K-in. spade bit and 
ground a fraction off each edge. 1 was 
careful to keep the bit symmetrical, 
cooling the steel frequently with 
water. As I got closer to the size I 
wanted, I chucked the bil and drilled 
trial holes until I had the correct 
diameter. The final step was to 
remove the burr by honing the bit flat 
on an oilstone. 

John Matthews 
Champaign, IL 



No-Hands Stop Switch 

"No-Grope Switches* 1 (Tech Tips," 
aw *53> was useful but required addi- 
tional switches and wiring, and you 
also have to take one hand off the 

Drill 1 W-ln.-dia. hole 
for access to "on" 
button* 




Tap with 
toe or 
knee to 
stopsa 



X**— STOP BtTTTQM 



u 




work to trip the switch — a potential 
safety hazard. A better solution is to 
modify the existing switch so it can 
be operated by foot. Hinge a piece of 
1x4, position a block to connect with 
the off switch and you're in business. 

George Weber 
Magalia, CA 

Model-Maker's Clamp 

This Light-doty clamp is ideal for 
model makers. All you need are some 
54n. wooden tongue depres- 
sors or popsiclc sticks, a 
rubber band, and a 
piece of dowel 
rod. You can 
vary the 




Glue dowel to 
only one stick 



pressure by changing where you 
place the rubber band and how many 
times you wrap it around the slicks. 

Jim Titc 
Fayetteville, AR 

BEST TIP WINS $200 

Know a better way of doing some- 
thing? Designed a clever jig? Send 
your woodworking tips, plus a sketch 
or a snapshot to: N Teeh Tips," 
American Woodworker 33 E. Minor St., 
Emmaus. PA 18098. We'll pay $50 
for each tip we publish and $200 for 
the best tip of the issue. 



26 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1934 



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THE BEST 16" BAM) SAW 



*v 




ONCE AGAIN, WE'VE BLOWN AWAY THE COMPETITION! 

Actually, there is none! We took on the challenge of developing the best 1 6" band saw 
on the market When you compare its many features to other machines hi this pTice 
range, you'll understand why Grizzly continues to leave its competition in the dust, 
Nobody even comes close! 



Here's why: 

* Grip- piece east Iron body 

* Bal an code a si iron wheels with rubber tires 

* Hinged wheel covers 

* Micro-adjustable blade guides 
(upper & lower) 

* Heavy-duty stand to prevent vibration 

+ 1V.H.P,. 110/220V motor prewired for 220V * Easy blade changes 
+ Wheel brush removes saw do st from wheels 



* Dust collection port fits most home 
shop vacuums 

* Fully adjustable upper wheel 

* Heavy-duty rip fence 

* Cast iron table 

* 3 blade speeds 



MODEL G1 073 ONLY 



$550 



F O.B. BELUNCHAM, WA ar 

WrLLtAJWSPOHT, PA 



CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE 1993 CATALOG! £ <J 



IMPORTS, UMC, 



if vcir ijvi-: wi:si of Tin: Mississippi 

P.O. Box 2069 Bellingham. WA 98227 
Customer Service (206) 647-0801 ORDERS; 1 -800-541 -5537 

IF Villi IJVK KASTOFTIIK UlSSlSSiri'l 

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Cuslomer Service (717) 33S-3«0fi ORDERS: 1-800-523-4777 






Cft&C NO « OjmQQLICT *JFORWTlOT FCFM 



AMERICAN WOODWOHKEH * JUNE 1994 27 




• • 



5J-XJ ' 




Curves 

In bygone days, when shipwrights 
along the coast of Maine needed 
curved timbers far their bouts, they 
purchased hackmatack roots whose grain 
would naturally follow the curves they 
needed. Today, only straight stock is 
.mailable to us commercially, so we 
woodworkers bypass mi lure and create 
curved wooden parts by cither bandsaw- 
ing h steam bending, or laminating, 

The first two techniques have draw- 
backs: Bundsawiii|( falls short when 
you're Looking for strength, because saw- 
ing a curve in straight-grained wood cre- 
ates "short grain f H which weakens the 
part, Steam bending fs better, since the 
grain of the wood follows the curve, But 
the curve can be inconsistent since the 
wood never loses its desire to "spring 

back 1 * as crushed cells from the bending 
process expand in response to humidity. 

laminate bending, while more time- 
consuming than steam bending, yields 
more reliable results. The technique 
involves gluing thin layers of wood 
together to create a thicker, curved 
piece, usually by clamping over a curved 
form. Once the glue sets, the piece 
remains curved because the glued faces 
can no longer slide by each other. 

Another advantage of laminate bending 
over steam bending is that you can create 
wide, curved panels using manufactured 
materials like thin plywood and veneer, 
whereas the width of steam-bent panels 
is limited to the width or" solid timber. 
Also, virtually any type of wood will work 
for lamination, while steam-bending 
favors certain species of wood such as 
wlute oak or ash. And while both steam- 
bent and laminate-bent pieces will spring 
back initially, a laminate bend holds its 
shape more dependably over time. 

That said, let's talk about the partial- 

Bent lamination is the best way to create 
a compound curve like the chair arm in the 
inset photo. Here, author makes one of the 
curved back less of the chair by clamping 
glued strips of wood to a one-part form 
made of medium-density floorboard. 



a 




form until the surface is at least is in. 
wider than your laminates. Cut notch- 
es or holes in the form to give your 
clamps a purchase at right angles to 
the curve. (Set* drawing.) 

For workpieees over 6 in., I make a 
wider form tike the one shown in the 
drawing. This gives mc a wide, rigid 
surface with a minimum of material 

Two-part fortius (sec drawing) arc 
often used for reverse curves* like the 
5-shape in a chair back. You construct 
them like one-part forms, except you 
make two forms I hat mate with each 
other. The laminates are placed 
between the two parts, and only a 
few clamps are needed to pull the 
forms together and distribute the 
clamping pressure evenly. 

The curvature of the two forms 
should not he identical. When laying 
out the forms, I match one form to my 




To build up the height of a form, make i 
matter piece, then screw slightly over- 
sized pieces to the master and trim 
them flush with a router. 

lars of ben i lamination, starting with 
the types of hen ding forms you'll 
need 10 create curved work. 

Bending Forms 
There are three basic types of bending 
forms, and each is suited to making 
certain kinds of 
curves. I build 
most of my forms 
from scrap -i-in. 
plywood or medi- 
um -density fiber- 
board CMDF)> (See 
lead photo.) 

Regardless of 
the type of form, 
you'll need to 
design for spring- 
bade by increasing 
the amount of cur- 
vature in your 
form. Although the 
exact amount of 

springbuck can Create compound curves using a strip of rubber inner tube to clamp the tarn i nates 
only be gauged by 







trial and error, springbuck will gener- 
ally increase as the thickness of the 
laminates increases. The lamination in 
the lead photo sprang off the form by 
about \* in. at each end. 

One- part bending forms arc gen- 
e rally used for curves that bend in 
only one direction. It's best to make 
this type of form convex , since it's 
easier to bend wood around a 
crowned surface (see lead photo) 
than to force it httti a holiow. 

To make a one-part form, handsaw 
a master piece of plywood or MI3l ; to 
the exact curve you want (allowing 
for springbuck), then screw additional 
pieces to the master and flush-trim 
them with a router. {See photo, top 
left.) Build up the thickness of the 



intended curve. Then I allow for the 
exact thickness of my laminates plus a 
masonite cover layer (I'll explain tliis 
later), by using dividers to lay out the 
curve for the outside form. It's difficult 
to create a perfectly matched two-part 
form, but you can even out clamp pres- 
sure by placing thin strips of rubber 
flashing or cork sheet material on the 
curved faces of your forms. (I scrounge 
rubber Hashing from my local roofer.) 

Free>form bending allows a more 
sculptural approach than the other 
two methods. It is used for compound 
curves like the sweep of the continu- 
ous arm of the chair shown opposite, 
Instead of being clamped to a continu- 
ous form, laminates are either partially 
or entirely bound together :ilong their 



Um pencil mark* to keep the laminates 
In sequence, so finished lamination will 
appear as a solid piece of wood. 

length with an clastic material such us 
strips of inner tube or surgical tubing. 
(See photo, below.) You'd t>e amazed 
how much pressure an elastic wrap 
can exert, though it does pull the lam- 
ination together more forcefully at the 
edges than in the center, making the 
technique better suited to narrow 

laminations. 

Preparing 
Laminates 

While any species 
of wood will work 
for lamination, 
there are some 
important points to 
consider when 
choosing stock. 

Laminates can 
he as thin as 
veneer, but thick- 
nesses up to l A in. 
are not uncommon 
for gradually 

curved furniture 
components, such 
as the crest rail on a chair. One rule of 
thumb is to use the greatest thickness 
that can be bent by hand to the 
intended curve without breaking. 
That rule is often tempered by the 
advice that you should use thinner 
Laminates when minimal springbuck is 
critical to your design. 

The inner layers and the surface lay- 
ers of a bent lamination can vary in 
thickness and composition. For exam- 
ple, you can create a ^-in .-thick curved 
door panel hy sandwiching two Livers 
of 'n-tn. plywood between two layers 
of '/ki-in. veneer. 

To minimize breakage in solid 
wood, select stock that's knot-free and 
fairly straight grained. However, even 
wild-grained stock can be coaxed into 



3 






AMERICAN WQOPWORKFR 



JUNE 1994 



CLAMPING FORMS 



ONE-PART FOAMS 
FOR NARROW WORK 



Mark centerlines on 
laminates to align 
with form, 




Clamp center 
first, then 
continue to ends, 



_. Cut notches 
for clamps. 

LAM IN A FES 



Make cover layer from 
VWn, or VWu. masonrte. 



Wax form and cover layer to 
keep laminates from sticking. 



Make form at 
itvist Vfe in. 
higher than 
width Of 
Laminates. 



FOR WIDE WORK 

MASONrTE COVER LAYER 

LAMINATES 



Glue and nail 
V4-m. masonite 
over ribs. 



Crown center of cauls to 
distribute cltmp pressure evenly. 




VZAH. PLYWOOD 

Bandsaw rib to desired curve 
minus thickness of V4-in, masonite. 



Clamp center first 
Cut holes in ribs for clamps. 
Notch ribs for wooden supports. 



TWO-PART FORM 
FOR REVERSE CURVES 



Ciimp center first 



LAMINATES ^£/ ( \ 




MASONITE COVEH LAYER 
RUBBER FLASHING 



"OUTER" 

FORM 



RUBBER 
FLASHING 

fea INMER H 

FORM 



Allow for thickness of 

laminates and caver 
Layer when Laying out 
curvature of outer form 



i curve without breaking, as long as 
it's thin enough. 

I use the handsaw to resaw my lam- 
inates t» any thickness down to ! ir. in. 
(See sidebar, page 31-) You can also 
use a tablcsaw. hut handsaw ing is 
safer, wastes less wood, and produces 
a closer grain match between adjacent 
laminates. For very thin laminates, you 
can buy veneer and cut it into strips 
of the necessarv width. 

■ 

When sizing a blank for resawing. 
make it about 6 in. longer and ' > in. 
wider than the finished lamination. 
This helps when dimensioning the 
thin stock, and also helps later when 
clamping and cutting the laminated 
pan to final size. 

Glue joints will have fewer gaps if 
the faces of the laminates are flat and 
clear of saw* marks, JVIy resaw tech- 
nique produces one clean face and 
one sawn face. (Sec sidebar,) To 
remove the saw marks, 1 resaw the 
laminates a little thick, and then plane 
them to exact dimension by taking 
light cuts with my thickness planer. 

Thiekncssing thin stock works bet- 
ter on small, high-speed planers than 
on big monsters, hut even so, your 
planer may chew up a few pieces, so 
It's a good idea to make some extra 
laminates. After thieknessing, trim 
any planer snipes from the ends of 
the laminates. 

To give the appearance of a solid 
board in the finished lamination, glue 
the laminates together in the same 
order as they came off the saw— the 
way salami drops off a meat slicer at 
the deli. (See photo, previous page.) 
Ill is helps hide glue lines and gives a 
more natural look to the work, If 
you're buying veneer for laminating, 
ask for "JUtdrcur veneer. 

Clamping the Laminates 
There are several approaches and 
techniques for clamping the laminates 
to the forms 

Prior to clamping, mark the center 
of the stack ot laminates so you can 
align them with the centerline of the 
form when you begin clamping, (See 
drawing,) 

On one- and two-part forms, use a 
cover layer of Vi-in. masonite ( 1 /h in. 
thick if the curve is severe) over the 
outermost laminate to help distribute 
the clamping pressure and to protect 



a 



£ 






3 



AMERICAN WOODWOHKER A JUNE 1994 



Che work. On a one-part form, use 
cauls 10 further distribute clamping 
pressure, spacing them no more than 
3 in. apart. (Sec lead photo,) For lami- 
nations over 5 in, wide, use clamps in 
pairs to hold the cauls, and crown the 
cauls a wee bit with a hand plane or 
jointer so they exert pressure at the 
center as the clamps pull the ends of 
the cauls tight. (Sec drawing.) 

To prevent glue from sticking the 
wrong parts together, wax the faces 
of the forms and any cover layers A 
coat of shellac also works, or you can 
insert sheets of waxed paper. 

Clamping can take perseverance. 
With two pun forms, the amount of 
movement needed to pull the lami- 
nates to the form may exceed the 
range of the clamp screws. In this 
case, draw the laminates partway 
down with one set of clamps and the 
rest of the way with another set along- 
side the first, 

An alternative method of clamping 
is to use a vacuum press. This is best 
for gentle curves, and is excellent for 
wide workplaces such as cabinet 
sides or door panels, because the 
clamping pressure is very uniform. In 
a vacuum press (see Sources, next 
page), the laminates and a cover layer 
are temporarily taped to the form 
(duct tape works well) and the assem- 
bly is placed in a sealed plastic bag. 
Air is sucked cmt of the bag via a vacu- 
um pump, and atmospheric pressure 
presses the Laminates to the form. 
(See photos, next page.) 

Your choice of glue lor hent lami- 
nation depends on the length of time 
you'll need for open and closed 
assembly, as well us any requirements 
for water resistance. 

So far. yellow polyvinyl acetate 
(PVA) glue has worked well for me 
through a variety of situations, and 1 
like its nontoxieity and case of 
cleanup. I use a slow -set PVA (see 
Sources) to give me ample time to get 

all the parts together before the glue 
sets. However, many woodworkers 1 
know prefer epoxy or plastic resin 
( urea-forinaldeliyde) glue (see 
Sources), 1hh1i of which have a longer 
working time Lhan regular P\ T As. Also. 
PVA glues have been known to creep 
slightly at the glue line over time, 
making the edge of the work feel 
rough to the touch. 




Resawing on the Bandsaw 

Resawing boards into thinner strips on the bandsaw wastes very little wood* 
which makes it a good method to use when you need to saw laminates for 
bent lamination, (See main article.) With a shop-made straight fence and a 
sharp blade, you can easily resaw stock as thin as Vie in., if you follow a 
few simple techniques. 

I generally use a x h- 
in. four-tooth hook 
blade for most of my 
resawing, although 
some woodworkers 
use skip-tooth blades 
with good results. 
(See "Choosing 

Bandsaw Blades," 
page 45 ,) Regardless 
of the type of blade Author saws along a straight line to determine the 
you use. make Sure "drift" of the blade, and then records the angle with a 
it's Sharp* bevel gauge. 

I use a simple right angled fence screwed together from scrapwood and 
plywood (see photo, below) that \ clamp to my bandsaw table. When build* 
ing the fence, make su^n the face l - perfectly square to the bottom so ttinfc 
once clamped, the fence is square to the saw blade. Positioning the fence 
for resawing can be tricky because most band saws rarely cut parallel with 
the edge of the saw table. Instead, the blade persistently wanders in its 
own direction, a phenomenon called drift. To compensate for this, the fence 
must be angled in the direction that the blade wants to cut, 

To "set the drift,* 
mark a line along the 
top of a straight 
board, parallel to the 
edge. Saw along the 
line, rotating the work- 
piece until you find 
the "angle of 
approach™ (where the 
blade follows the line 
exactly), then stop, 
hold the wood in posi- 
tion, and record its 
angie to the bandsaw 
table with a bevel 
gauge. (See photo, 
above, j Use the bevel 

gauge to align the fence at the same angle, and ctamp the fence at the 

desired distance from the blade. 

To resaw. mill your stock four-square {all four sides square to each other J 
and make sure your blade Is square to the table. Make a test cut on some 
scrap, then resaw the first piece, holding the work firmly against the fence. 
Push the board through the saw at a steady rate that doesn't slow the blade 
or tax the motor. Then resurface the sawn face of the stock on the jointer, 
and resaw again. For safety, use the thickness planer to clean up the sawn 
side when the stock becomes thinner than l /? in. or so. —P.K* 




Resawing is more accurate when you use a sharp blade 
and a simple shop*made fence* 









AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



3 1 




tteforc gluing the laminates, it s 
best to dry-clamp them to make sure 
you have every tiling in order. Then 
spread a thin, even coat of glue on 
both sides of each glue joint. I find 
the best tool for spreading glue is a 3- 
in. paint roller with a low nap. 

Once you've spread the glue, clamp 
the work to the form as quickly as 
possible. Witt) the laminations slip- 
ping around and the resistance of the 
wood to bending, you'll probably 
want an extra pair of hands around. 
Keep the lamination stack aligned 
edgc-to-edge as best you can, but rest 
assured, you'll never keep ii perfect. 

Dimensioning the Lamination 

The layered edges of a new lamina- 
tion are uneven and usually covered 
with dried crusts of glue. The first 




thing to do is remove as much of the 
surface glue as possible with a paint 
scraper so U won't dull your tools. 

To dimension your laminated part, 
you'll need to create a straight edge 
on the pan. The best method I have 
found is to sweep the work over a 
jointer. (See photo, below left.) Once 
you have a straight, square edge, you 
can rip the opposite edge parallel on 
the tablesaw. (See photo, below,) An 
alternative is to use the handsaw: 
Mark the width with a flexible 
straightedge or a marking gauge, then 
handsaw to the line, pivoting the 
work piece on its curve to keep It in 
contact with the table at the blade. 
Clean up any machine marks with a 
hand plane. 

Dene lamination is a simple tech- 
nique that opens up a wide range of 




To square the edge of a Curved lamina- 
tion, first use a jointer (left), taking light 
cult and keeping the outside face 
against the fence near the cutterhsad. 
Then rip it to width on a tablesaw with 
an auxiliary fence. Use a feather board 
to steady the workptece, and a push 
a tick at the end of the cut to keep your 
hands clear of the blade- The tablesaw's 
splitter helps prevent kickback. 




BaaaaaaaawHMB 
Author uses a vacuum press to clamp 
laminates onto a one-part form . The 
work fa placed Inside the bag (left) 
and the vacuum pump on the floor 
sucks the air from the bag. Atmospheric 
pressure holds the laminates (above) 
ttghtty to the form. 

design options, It combines the natu- 
ral beauty of wood 
with modern adhe- 
sive* to enhance the 
grace iind sircit^th of 
your work. A 

PETER HORN 

teaches workshops in Ruck hunt, 
Maine. He is the author of W&Ekiim. 
with Wood: 77jt» Basics of 
Cr aftsmanship (1993. Taimtrm Press, 
ftox355> Newtown, C7*(Hi470X 




Glues for laminating are available 
from the following sources; 

Garrett Wade 

161 Ave. of the Americas 

New York, NY 10013 

(800) 221-2942 

Circle #657 

Gougeon Brother* Inc. 

Box 90S, Bay City, Ml 4S707 
(S17) 684-7286 

ClrcJe #658 

OMe Mill Cabinet Shoppe 

1660 Camp Betty Washington Rd, 

York, PA 17402 

(717) 755-8884 

Circle #659 

Vacuum proBsctft are available 
from the following sources; 

Mercury Vacuum Presses 

Box 2232, Fort Bragg, CA 95437 
(600) 995-4S06 

Clrete #660 

Vacuum Pressing Systems Inc. 

553 River Rd. 

Brunswick, ME 04011 

{207) 725-0935 

Circle #661 



32 AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE I £ 9 4 



Helps You Plane Perfect 






To plane a perfect miter* fir si clamp your work piece lightly in the miter jack* 
£ Ihenmse the fixture's massive 45 jaws to guide your plane. 




'ben a craftsman needed to cut 
precision miters 1*50 years Ago, 
hc'tl pull out a shop- mack- miter 
jack and :i hand plane and shave a 
dead- perfect tS angle m seconds. A 
century and a half later, the miter jack 
is Mill a great tool for precision work. 
The one shown here lets you miter 
any length of stock, and you can miter 
work pieces like box sides, up to 7 in. 
wide. You can also shave miters that 
aren't exactly 45% such as you need 
when you 1 re installing trim around a 
sagging doorway. 



In addition to miter cuts, von can 
use the hack side of the jack to accu- 
rately shave a workpiece to a 90° 
angle, Plus", the quiet process of plan* 
ing a glassy-smooth miter is a satisfy- 
ing experience — and a safc alternative 
to power tools. 

tills miter jack isn't complicated to 
make. (See drawing J It's basically just 
a vise with ramped faces— the vise 
jaws hold the workpiece in position 
and the ramps provide a wide surface 
for your plane. However, there are 
some points you should keep tn mind: 




Author uses pliers to turn wood-thread' 
ing tap into block clamped in vise. 
External threads on wooden screw were 
cut with die In background. 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 33 



Construction Notes 

•Make the ramps from a close-grained 
hardwood so they can withstand 
abuse from a metal-bodied plane. My 
ramps are mahogany, but you could 
use any fairly dense hardwood. If you 
can't find a single chunk of wood 
thick enough far the ramps, you can 
make them by laminating thinner 
stock together. 

• Use a quartcrsawn hardwood for the 
frame. This will reduce the chance of 



warping, which could cause the guide 
block to bind. (Sec drawing,) 
■Cut the angled ramps by marking a 
45* angle on both sides of your stock 
and ban drawing just shy of the line. 
After all the other parts are made, 
assemble the miter jack, tighten the 
ramp blocks together, and use a jack 
plane to clean up the surface to the 
layout lines. Make sure the surface is 
flat by holding a straightedge on the 
ramps, then check the 45° angle with 



a draftsman's triangle or a combina- 
tion square. After this, plane two trial 
miters and assemble them, If they 
create a perfect 90° miter, your 
ramps are accurate, (See photo, 
opposite page,) 

You may need to replane the 
ramps periodically because of wood 
movement. 

• Make the wooden screw from a 
turned blank rather than from ready- 
made dowel stock. You need a per* 



MITER JACK 



RAMP BLOCKS 
34A X 3 Vfi * 10 L 



RETAINING SCREW 

*12xlVz 



ANCHOR BLOCK 
I Vl * 3^4 i 8 




GUIDE BLOCK 
*tv4^x7 



Ribtet 



\ 

Assemble frame, 
then rip 45° angle 
on front edge. 



r 



FH0HTV1EW 



Drill Vlfr-in.-deep 
x 14n.*dti. holt 
in screw pad., 




22V* 



ANCHOR 
BLOCK 





Turn and of wooden 
■crew Id to In. dia. 



SECTION A - A 



*-3 7 A 

RAMP 



BLOCK 




GUIDE BLOCK 



Rout V*x¥a reboot 
lor guide block. 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



J LINE 1994 




Clamp the work piece so the bottom edge of the stock is fiat against the frame and 
the miter edge protrudes beyond the ramps Vis In, or so. Then plane downhill 
toward the face of the molding to prevent any fibers from tearing out* 



fcctly round, straight screw for 
smooth, even action. Dowels tend to 
be oval in cross-section and warped, 
■ There are several wavs to cut the 

f 

threads in the wooden screw and 

the anchor block, ranging from spe- 
cial router or lathe attachments to 
wood -threading taps and dies. I used 
a l'/i-in. tap and die (sec Sources), 
but a Vin> or 1 in, tap and die will 
work as well. Lubricate the cutters 
with some lemon or linseed oil, and 
tap the anchor block first. Then use 
the die to cut threads on a test 
screw, checking that the threads 
engage the tapped hole smoothly, 
Once the fit is right, cut the threads 
on the actual screw. 

Alternatively, you can substitute a 




To chech that each miter cut Is an accu- 
rate 45, hold two work pieces together 
with a square butted tightly In the comer. 



metal veneer-press screw for a wood- 
en screw, (See Sources.) If you opt for 
a veneer screw, raise the miter jack by 
attaching a I -in. -f luck spacer under 
the frame so the screw's handle will 
clear your bench. 

• Aim for a snu^ fn between the guide 
block and the rabbeted frame pieces. 
After assembling the miter jack, check 
that the guide block slides smoothly, 
If it's too tight, shave some material 
from the guide block with a rabbet 
plane. Waxing the block also helps. 
•To prevent the *12 retaining screw 
from binding in the screw pad (sec 
drawing), drive the *12 screw home, 
and then back off the screw a quar- 
ter-turn. 

Using a Miter Jack 
To use the jack, you first rough-cut 
your .stock to 45°, then clamp the 
workpiece in the jack and plane diag- 
onally across the piece until the miter 
is flush with the ramp surface. (See 
photo, above.) 

The type of plane you use will 
depend on the size of the workpiece. 
For stock wider than 2 or 3 in. t a 
plane about 14 in. long (like a jack 
plane) works well. Thin, narrow 
pieces can be planed with a low-angle 
block plane. In any case, the plane 
body must be long enough to span 
the gap between the ramps. My 
favorite plane is a Lie-Nielsen tow- 
angle jack plane. (See Sources.) Its 



low-angled blade cuts end grain clean- 
ly, and its length and heft arc perfect 

for most jobs. 



Afterthoughts 

Woodworkers often ask how I keep 
from damaging the ramps when plan- 
ing, Mostly it's a case of having a feel 
for the plane I'm using, and practice. 
But beginners can protect the ramps 
by gluing heavy paper dike a grocery 
bag) onto them, A mixture of onc- 
tlitrd yellow glue to two-thirds water 
will hold the paper in place until it 
needs replacing, at which time you 
can peel it off, scrape the surfaces of 
the ramps, and apply a fresh sheet. As 

you gain experi- 
ence, you can 
forgo the paper 
.-. because you'll 

rarely cut into the 
1^. ramps. A 






\ 



MARIO RODRIGUEZ is a pro- 
fessional cabinetmaker who teaches 
uroodworkirtg in New York. 

SOURCES 

Wood-threading taps and dies 
are available from: 

CONOVER WOODCRAFT 

4425 Emery Industrie! Pkwy, 

Cleveland. OH 44128 

4800) 433-5221 

Circte MQ 

FROG TOOL 

700 W, Jackson 8lvcL Chicago, IL 60661 

4800) 648-1270 

Circte *636 

WOODCRAFT SUPPLY CO. 

210 Wood County Industrial ParK 
Box 1686, Parkersburg. WV 26102 

(800) 225-1153 
Circle #637 

Veneer-press screws are 
available from: 

CONSTANTINE'S 
2050 Eastchester Rd.< BrOnx h NY 10461 

{SOOJ 223 8087 

Circle #638 






CLAMP CO. INC. 

Rte. 611. Mount Bethel, PA 13343 

{800} 451-1852 

Circle #639 

Low-angle jack planes are 

available from: 

LIE-NIELSEN TOOLWORKS INC. 

Rte. 1. Warren, ME 04864 
(80OJ 327-2520 

Ctrcie #640 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 



aa 




A study in contrasting woods, this delicate napkin holder gives you a chance to improve your hand skills. 

Aw Elegant Project That Covers Alt the Angles 



Frustration can often be the 
source of inspiration, and that 
is the case with this napkin 
holder. I designed and built it simply 
because 1 was tired of having napkins 
all over the place. 

Most of the parts for the holder 
came from my scrap pile. The triangu- 
lar sides and the drawer fronts are 
bird's-eye maple, while the shelves 
and other drawer parts are plain hard 
maple. For contrast, 1 used thin strips 
of Brazilian rosewood for the edging 
that runs around the triangles and the 
bottom shelf. Thin strips of hard 
maple hide the end grain on the top 
shelf, on the top of the drawer front 
and on the bottom* of the triangles. 

Only two parts came ready-made; 
the ^in,-dia, beads I used for the feet, 
and the !&in.-dia. dowels I used in the 
joinery, (Beads and dowels are avail- 
able from Woodworks, 4500 
Anderson Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 
76i 17,800-7224)311.) 

This piece is not complicated, but 
making it will give you a chance to 
improve your hand skills, I found 
great pleasure in using a hand plane, 



6y Yeung Chan 

scraper and knife to fit each part. 
Here are some construction tips: 
•Joining the Parts; I used dowels 
to join the triangular .sides to the 
upper and lower shelves, and I 
joined the drawers with ^in.-decp 
rabbets. All the other parts are sim- 
ply glued edge-to-edge. 
• Drilling the Shelves: The trickiest 
pan of making the holder is accurate- 
ly drilling the dowel holes in the 3fa- 
in. -thick shelves. I did this on the 
drill press, 1 stood the shelves on 
edge and backed them with a fence 
to keep them perpendicular to the 
drill-press table. 

•Making the Edging: I ripped all the 
edging slightly oversize on the tabic- 
nw, using a zero-clearance throat 
insert and a push stick with a long 
bearing surface (sec aw #27, page 29). 
Then 1 planed each piece to final 
thickness with a block plane. 
•Fine-tuning the Drawers; Moving a 
drawer in its opening creates air pres- 
sure, and this can make it hard to close 
the drawer. To relieve the air pressure, 



I drilled a series of small holes in the 
bottom shelf. (See drawing.) 
•Holding Up the Napkins: Napkins 
set in a holder like this tend to fall 
over when the holder is less than one- 
third full. To prevent this 1 made a 
spring steel brace from 0.024-in<-dia» 
music wire (available at hobby and 
model shops). To install the brace, I 
drilled two Ut-in.-deep holes at a steep 
angle where the shelf meets the trian- 
gular side. (See drawing detail.') 
• Wood Movement: In making this 
piece 1 have joined side grain to long 
grain, and you might think that is a 
problem. However, the wood hasn't 
moved at all in the last three years. 
The parts arc all very thin, which 
helps, but I also live on the West Coast 
in a stable climate. If you arc con- 

cemed about move- 
ment, you might 
want to make the 
sides and shelves 
from veneered ply- 
wood. A 

nfflMll 
YEUNG CHAN is a furniture 

maker in northern California. 




& 

t 

3 






AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1904 



NAPKIN HOLDER 



Miter cuds of edging. 



ROSCWOOO EDGING 
ViG THICK 



Drill ¥tt \n, 
holes for dowels. 



MAPLE EDGING 
Vto THICK 



£ 




NOTES: 

•All drawer parts V* in. thick. 

• After assembly, sand drawers 
for slightly loose fit 






Angle drawer skies to 
match sides of holder. 



RABBET Vl*0 



MAPLE EDGING 

Vfc THICK 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 19 9 4 37 



Elephant 
VBS-14 





B U Y E R1S GUIDE 




Inca 340 



Laguna LT-18 




Enlon EN-BS 



• 





SAWS FOR ALL REASONS: WE TEST 21 MODELS 

by dave sellers 




Ask a group of woodworkers what's the 
most valuable machine in ihe work- 
shop, and you* re sure to get differing 
opinion*. Bui there's no doubt you'll find 
the handsaw near the top of the list, The 
handsaw is arguably the most versatile 
woodworking machine you can own< It can 
cue delicate curves in thick or thin stock, 
and it's ideal for resawing wide stock into 
thinner boards. Also, you can rip and cross- 
cut odd-shaped hoards and turning blanks 
on a handsaw. And it's certainly one of the 
safest machines to operate, 

Tlit it arc do/ens of woodworking hand- 
saws on the market, many of them first-rate . 
To give you an idea of what's available we 
picked 21 saws, from benchtops to heavy- 
duty floor models, that represent a cross- 
section of the market and set them up in 
our shop* We installed Olson Vin,, 4-tooth- 
per-in, Ctpi), skip-tooth blades on the 
machines so we could conduct cutting tests 
with consistency. (The maximum blade 
width on the Black 3*. Decker and Sears 10- 
in, saws was ' i in.) Then we evaluated fit 
and finish, the effectiveness of blade 
guides, the ease of blade changing, and 
power. The chart on page 40 shows how 
the saws fared, with tint hulltt indicating 
unacceptable performance and five hulled 
indicating excellence, 

A few saws, including ihe two incas, the 
Kity and the Delta 12-iru ran well right out 
of the box. But most required some tuning 
beforv they'd operate properly. Some need- 
ed more extensive work, and we had to 
replace defective parts on two saws, as I'll 
explain later However none of the repairs 
required special toots or skills, so we decid- 
ed to judge each saw s performance after 
tuning and reworking. A footnote indicates 
which saw s needed work 

What to Look For 

A handsaw is a simple machine— just a 
motor and a few wheels— hut it will only 
give you peak performance if all the parts 



are designed, manufactured and tuned well. 
Here are the points you should consider in 
choosing a saw: 

Fit and Finish— Check for faults in the 
castings and for parts that are poorly 
machined. Then look at how well all the 
parts fit together and how smoothly the 
moving parts operate. 

Among our test saws, the Kity, the 
General and the two Inca handsaws had the 
best fit and finish, while the Enlon and 
Elephant machines scored lowest because 
they had rough castings and poorly 
machined or ill-fitting parts. It took a few 
hours of filing, grinding and tuning to get 
these two saws running well. 

Saw Guides — A saw's guide system, 
which includes the upper and lower blade 
guides and thrust bearings (see drawing), 
directly affects how well the saw cuts. 
When you feed a workpiece into die blade, 
the thrust hearings prevent the blade from 
shifting backward and jumping off the 
wheels. And the guides reduce side-to-sidc 
twist, which can produce bowed cuts or 
allow a blade to wander off a straight line. 
To assess these parts, look at how easily 
they adjust, how rigid they are when you 
apply pressure side-to-side and fore-and-aft, 
and whether they remain parallel to the 
blade as you raise and lower the guide post. 

For ease of adjustment, the best per- 
formers in our test were the Delta 14-hv, 
General, Jet, and Grizzly, all of which fea- 
ture * micro-ad just" guides and thrust hear* 
ings that you set by turning a knob (see top 
photo, opposite page). The Kity also 
requires no tools to adjust, but it didn't have 
the micro-adjust feature. Most of the guides 
on the machines were easy to sec and 
reach, though the lower guides on the 
Grizzly are located so close to the saw table 
that it was hard to visually align the guides 
with the blade. At the other extreme, it took 
three wrenches to adjust the guides on the 
I'owcrmatic Artisan and the Stars lS-in. 

The Kity has the simplest guide system. 



a 



3S AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 19 9 4 



i 



i 



partly because, unlike most other saws, you 
track all blades that arc more than % in. 

wide hy just extending the blade teeth over 
[he from edge of the saw's flat w heels. Thai 
means blade teeth always ride in the same 
place in the saw's wooden guide blocks, so 
you only need to adjust them for wear. The 
Kity also has just one thrust bearing to 
adjust Con top). But we didn't find that the 
lack of a lower thrust bearing affected the 
Cut, even during thick rcsawing. 

Kid l-bca ring guides (see photo, right), as a 
rule, were fussier to set than solid metal, 
wood or plastic guide blocks. For most cut- 
ting, ball-bearing guides and solid guides 
perform equally well. Hut with ball-bearing 
guides there's less friction on cuts that side 
load the blade, 



after we eliminated excessive play by 
replacing the cover that held the post In 
the saw frame). But the round, keyed 
guides on the Jci and Delta 14-in, saws 
were also very solid. 

When you raise ;uul lower the guide post, 
it should remain parallel to the blade, both 
sidewavs and fore-and-aft. If it doesn't, vou'll 
have to readjust the guides when the thick- 
ness of your workpicce changes. 

hi our lest for parallelism, most saws fell 
within acceptable limits of about H*-in. devi- 
ation from the lowest Ruldc-post position to 
the highest, and saws with square steel 
posts tended to be the most precise. The 
Hnlon and Elephant saws had hexagonal 
posts with badly machined clamps that 

wouldn't keep 



TYPES OF GUIDES 




TEN30N KNOB 



SWITCH 



such as very sharp 
curves. 

The best of the 
ball-bearing 
guides were the 
European-style 
units on the 
Bridge wood- (See 
photo, bottom 
right.) These bear- 
ings run parallel 
rather than per- 
pendicular to the 
blade, as most 
ball-bearing 
guides do, and the 
European guides 
adjust more pre- 
cisely because 
they move in and 
out on a threaded 
shaft, rather than 
on an eccentric 
shaft. The Laguna 
saw comes stan- 
dard with similar 
European guides, 
but our Laguna test saw was equipped with 
optional Carter ball-hearing guides (available 
as a retrofit tor most handsaws from Carter 
Products Co. Inc., 616-451-2928). The 
Outer guides took a hit longer to adjiiM bur 
they performed as well as the European 
guides, and their more compact shape gave 
the laguna an extra inch of cutting height 
capacity. 

You want a saw with a rigid guide 
post so it will keep the blade from twisting 
and flexing in the cut. The square steel 
posts on the General. Rowermaric Artisan 
and Grizzly were surely the most rigid 
(though the Grizzly performed well only 



ANATOMY OF A BANDSAW 



Metal b I i 1 1 U *i are I nexpensi ve 
and easy to adjust, but they 
cause greater friction than ball- 
bearing guides when you're cut- 
ting curves. 



TENSION SPRING 



WHEEL 



BLADE GUARD 

UPPER GUIDE 
ASSEMBLY 



THROAT PLAT! 



i heir guide posts 
parallel. But after 
some grinding 
and filing, they 
worked properly. 
The guide posts 
*m the Inca 710, 
liridgewood. 
Laguna and Sears 
I vin. saws ran on 
rack-and-pinion 
mechanisms. This 
made adjustment 
more precise and 
kept the guide 
post from crash- 
ing t« the tabic 
when the lock 
knoh was loos- 
ened. 

Changing the 
Blade — This is a 
frequent task, so 
you want it to go 
quickly. We timed 
how long it took 
_ I to change the 
blade H then tension it and track it and .id just 
the guides, Saws that inofc less than 5 min- 
utes won an excellent rating. Those in the 
10-minutc range wc considered good, and 
those that took longer than 10 minutes 
rated fair. (Longer times were mostly due to 
more difficult guide adjustment.) None of 
the saws were unacceptable, 

Power — A saws power affects the thick- 
ness of the stock you can cut and how fast 
you can cut u We tested each saws rela- 
tive power (sec chart) hy riming how long 
it took to resaw a S' .-in. -wide, IS-in -long 
piece of hard maple. Because of height 
capacity on the Ryobi, Black & Decker and 




TmiNNIGN 

LOWER GUIDE 
ASSEMBLY 

DRIVE WHEEL 




Ball-bearing guides run cooler 
than metal blocks, but they're 
fussier to adjust. 




European- style ball-bearing 
guides are easy to adjust pre- 
cisely, but their large size can 
affect cutting height capacity. 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 



30 




Delta 

28-560 



Jot JBS-14C5 





Ski HD3G4Q 



■jST^ 



1* 

Dremel 1120 





Detta 28 ISO 



BANDSAWS RATED 





tUrmk 
Model 



fyohi HS900 
[800] 123-4415 
| Circle *M1 

Skil H03640 
5,6, Power Tool Co. 
(312) 286-7130 
Circle #642 

Dremel 1120 
(£00] 437-3615 
Cirti*#«43 



Black A 
Decker 9443 
1800} 763^672 
Girds (*64-4 

Sean 244530 
1800} 177-7414 

Circle *£45 

Detta 28*560 
18001 223-7271 
Cinclft #&*6 

ImcM no 

fimttWxff 
1800} 221 2942 

Circle »647 



uMTmt Wedo 
19001 221-2942 

Circle #647 

Sean 24832N 
18001 177-7414 
Circle #ft*5 

Mbai-lSt 

{8001 223-7271 
CTclef^e 

hif,G13 

FMTbMirtilurr 

48001 172-5439 
QKltf #6*6 



EK-BS14 

18001811*9607 
Circle *6*9 

Heftoirf VBS-J4 
SosWR MocMNtfy 
I800I926-4321 
Circle *£5Q 

JetJBS-14C5 
1800)274-0841 

Circle ȣ5: 

D*Ha2S245 
1800} 223-7271 
Circle #*40 

Powemutle 
Arbsan 043 
1800} 2484144 
Circle *£53 

Sun 24393 

1800} 377-7414 
Circle #S<5 

General 490-1 
1119} 472-1161 
Cirt**653 



Grizzly G1073 
1800] 541-S537 
Circle *6S4 



WM* Mocbbwy Co. 
f717) 1 64-5000 
Circ* #655 

Laiwu LT-18 {A) 
IBM! 234-1976 

Ore* *656 



I In.) 
9 

10 
10 



Cpy 



Muimm Cutting 

HefcWflo.l 



10 



10 



16 



20 



12 
12 
12 

14 
14 

14 
14 

14 

15 
IS 



16 



17 



17 1 /* 



3 1 /* 



Price 
1180 

S3 50 
$365 



3 T /a 

3 

a 



S1&9 



S199 



5399 



11,495 



6 1 /* 

7 3 /a 
6 
8 

6 
6 



6 

7!/3 

6 



seas 



$329 



S369 



5895 

(1995 

withstand) 

$315 



$359 



SoZii 



SS99 



5675 



1700 



S972 



7 1 /* 



9 



$550 



11.595 



12 /13(A) 



81.695 



mire 

Fftf. Hide Btedu Power 
Unlit! Guides ChingJrtj 



•*eiC! 






##*#(Cf 



•t #** L- 



m •»*;b; 1 



SPECIFICATIONS 



Wheel Runout [WU 
rrop^Botlwti] 



•mi *m#;b) 



i(A) 



.006/.011 



.O07/.0O7 



.006/005 



.015/.011 

.011/.012 
.011/.007 
.012/.005 



,Q04/.004 

JQQTfJm 
.005/.0OB 



.001/.003 






.019/014 
■016A014 

.001/005 

.014/.017 

.015 / ,010 

.009/005 
,005/,Q07 
.0OS/.Q07 

.002/.003 



.0O5/.0O4 



KEY 

{A) Equipped with aftemnarfcet Carter guides; (B) After reworking post clamp; (C) Based on re sawing 3V*ln.-in1ck maple; 
|D} For BUde Guide Type: M=MeUi, B-Bail beanng, C-Cool Blocks™. P=Graphlt<Hmpregnated plastic. W-Wocd: il\ With 
stand and moww 



40 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER * JUNE 1994 



Table S4ie(bi.;WxD}/ Trunnion Blade Guld* 
Table Tit Type Type (D) 



ll*/3 * 11 V? 
45'ft O'L 

IS 1 /? k 13 l /J 
50R ■ 5L 



13*/=* 13 7* 
45'fl 6'L 



llV= * ll 1 /! 
45R 5 - L 



BUd«S«wd|i| 
ttp«J 



Bade 

WMthllO 



HP 



Bracket 



Bracket 



Brocket 



Bracket 



M 



M 



2,650 


l /B 3 /a 


3,000 


V>Vj 


9fXl/3.000 


Vs-Va 



^ 



l /2 



Va 



Vbtts Ahdb 



115 



115 



115 



2.5 



60 



7,0 



Wafcttflbt-I 



Continents 



2,700 



l^.l 



/*V* 



l /3 



115 



2.3 



30 



65 



33 



Smallest height capacity of h*r>wheeled 
saws tested; rack and pinion guide post: 
no blade tension Kale: has »he<H brush 

Good performance, large depth 
capacity for benclttop saw; guides 
adjust wHh cob wrench; has wheel brush 

Good performance, large depth capacity 
far benchtap sjwv; second, how speed good 
(Or non-wood materials; has wheel brush 



Good power tor size: kw cost for 10-in, 
throat capacity; no blade tension scale 



llVa " llV? 
ATR 2' L 

16 k 16 
45'R > 3"L 

20V*"2Q l /4 
45'LO-ft 



12V2 * 12 l /J 

45I.0'R 



Bracket 



Bracket 



Bracket 



Bracket 



M 



rV 



D 



300-2,460 
Variable 



V»'*/4 



450/2 T 400 */■- % 



Vs 



l /* 



115 



115 



2.4 



7.4 



9S4/l,$6e/ Vl*l 1^3 115 17,2 

2,952 



3,450 



/»* V2 V* 



115 



fi,B 



24 Variable spends good for non-wood 

materials 



156 (E) Large throat capacity for one*; bottom fuide 

difficult to adjust; lacks power and 
slurdiness for cutting thick stock 

135 (E) Rach-and-pJnion guide post easy to use; Huge 

throat capacity for nwdwm weight sow; 
magnetic switch: has wheel brush; has flat 
rubber tires: 2-in, riser block available 



€0 (El Best-built small saw: magnetic switch; 

has wheel brush: has flat rubber fores 



23 % rc 1 /* 

45ft fJL 

14x14 

45H O'L 

19 l /2 * 19 l /2 
45 fi O'L 



14«14 
45'R - 10'L 

14*14 
45L 15R 



15x15 
45R - 10% 

14 s 14 
45 R 10L 

15* 15 
4£'R- l&'L 



15)15 
45'R O'L 

IS 1 /* * 15 V* 
45'R ■ 10'L 



filling Frame 



Saddle 



Bracket 



ts.v:..:r: 



Saddle 



Saddle 



Saddle 



Bracket 



Bracket 



Saddle 



M 



W 



w 



IV 



N' 



M 



3 



M 



M 



1.500/3.000 


V* ■ Va 


Va 


115 


7.9 


125 (E) 


2,700 


V«- V* 


Va 


115 


7.6 


170 [£) 


3,150 


>/•■! 


l*/a 


115 


130 


150 IE) 


2,400 


l /*-V* 


»/4 


115/ 
230 


13/ 
6 


156(E) 


3,000 


V*- 3 /* 


V* 


115/ 
230 


12/ 
6 


190(E) 


3,000 


V«- 3 /4 


1 


115/ 
230 


16/ 
8 


185(E) 


3,000 


V*' 3 /4 


V* 


115 


9.0 


201(E) 


3 t ODO 


V8 3 /4 


3 /4 


115/ 
230 


12/ 
6 


166 (EJ 


3,000/2.000 


V*6-i 


i,« 


115/ 
230 


11/ 
5.5 


260 (El 


3,000 


3 /16l 


3 /4 


115/ 
230 


10,6/ 
54 


310 it) 


1,000/2.400/ 
2,900 


tyii 


lVs 


115/ 

210 


16y 

a 


395 |E) 



Unique saw frame hits for angle cuts, but 
frame is weak and flenea under heavy load; 
large table 

Best buy for siie: work light, included; 
has two wheel brushes 

Huns very smoothly: gLuoe system easiest 
to adjust; magneto switch; has flat 
rubber tires 

Required considerable work to run well 
(see text]; &m. riser block available 

Required considerable work to run well 
(sea text] 



Micrthadpust blade guides hand adjustable: 
6-Jri, rise* block available 



Micro adjust blade gudes hand adjustable; 
also aval ladle wrth J /i- or 1-HP motor with 
enclosed stand: 64n. riser block available 

Guides difficuh to adjust, require thres 
wrenches 



Rack-and-oinion guide post easy to use; 
three tools required to adjust guides; 
00 btatfe-tensjon scale 

Square blade guide post very rigid; 
saw frame and stand solidly burtt 



\? 



17*17 
4SR ■ 10'L 



19 l /2 x 15 l /2 
45'R O'L 



Saddle 



Saddle 



v 



e 



4.174 



3 /i*'lV« 2.4 



230 13.4 



395 (E) 



Micro-adjust blade guides hand-sdjustabJe: 
no too' 5 needed to adjust guides: required 
work to run well |«* te<t)t no biaoxension 
scale 

Rimi very smoothly: rack endpmion guide 
post easy lo use: guides easy to adjust; 
toot brake; has Mat rubber tires 



23 1 19 3 /* 

45'fl fi H L 



Siiddltf 



G 



4.436 



L /*l 



1 B 



230 



7.1 



360(E) Rack and pinion guide post easy to use; 

large panic button for quick shutdown; 
toot bfake 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



41 



Powerrnatic 
Artisan 043 





: ^&LK : 



Bridgewood 
P85440B 




IncaTIO 





Ryobf B5900 



244530 





Black & Decker 
9443 



10-in, Sears bench top saws, we had to sub- 
stitute Mn^wide maple. 

The Bridge wood was the- hands-down 
winner in the power department — it 
sliced through the maple in just 14 sec- 
onds with power to spare. But our resaw 
test pushed many of the saws to the limits 
of their power, and we had to nurse the 
cut to keep from hogging down. The 
Delta l64n, three-wheeler eouldnt resaw 
Ski-in. maple without the drive belt jump- 

ing off of the pulley under heavy load. 
However, the Delta three-wheeler was 
able to resaw 3* in. thick maple successful- 
ly f If somewhat slowly. We also found thai 
saws with multiple blade speeds rcsawed 
best on the fast speed. 

At first the Jet's 1-HP motor bogged 
down badly. The company sent us a 
replacement motor and on rctcsting the 
saw did just line. 

Frames. Wheels, 
Tables and Trunnions 

We've talked about how flex in the guide 
post can affect the cut, but flex in the 
frame can allow the blade to twist, too, 
We found that saws with cast-iron frames, 
such as the General, Delta, and others, 
were the most rigid. Hut saws such as the 
10'/>in. Inea, which has a cast-aluminum 
frame, were also fairly solid. Two other 
aluminum-framed saws, the Sears 124n. 
and the Inca 710 three- wheeler, flexed 
quite a bit under heavy load. However, the 
Inca's flex resulted mainly from its huge 
204n. throat. 

Vibration, usually stemming from unbal- 
anced or out-of-round wheels, is one of the 
biggest detriments to precise cutting, Oui- 
Ofround wheels also stress blades, some- 
times leading to premature breakage. We 
measured the runout of each saw's wheels 
with the blade installed and tensiorted. (See 
chart-) The smoothest-running saws, such 
as the Klty and the Bridge wood, had the 
least wheel runout. The Grizzlv saw had a 
strong vibration that we traced tu the 
motor, A replacement motor furnished by 
the company solved the problem. 

A flat, rigid table is essential for band- 
sawing accuracy and a must if you plan to 
clamp on accessories such as shop-made 
fences and circle-culling jigs. In general, 
we found cast iron tables were the most 
solid, while aluminum tables tended to flex 
more under the weight of heavy stock. Hut 
table flex is also related to the mounting 

system, called the tritunifuis, that connect 
the table to the saw's frame. 




Generally, saddlfi-type trunnions, as on the jet 
(above), were more rugged than bracket-type 
trunnions, though the bracket* type trunnions 
on the Inca 340 (below) allowed the table to 
tilt smoothly, and the single lock lever stabi- 
lized the table securely. 




Table trunnions are protractor-shaped 
metal runners that let you tilt the table for 

angle cuts. Our test saws were equipped 
with either saddle-type trunnions or h rack- 
et-type. (See photos, above) The saddle- 
type trunnions generally tilted smoothly, 
loeked solidly and kept the table rigid, 
Most of the bracket-type trunnions, with 
the exception of the Kity vnd the two 
Incus, tended to stick when we tilted the 
table, The Powcrmatic Artisan and Delta 
1 6* in. saws had the stickiest bracket-type 
trunnions. 

The tahle on the Sears 12-im saw didn't 
tilt at all. To make angled cms. you turn a 
crank and tilt the entire saw frame. The tilt 
mechanism may be a slick engineering 
idea, but its lightweight construction 
caused the frame to flex during the resaw- 
ing test, and the clamp that held the saw 
in position offered so little pressure, you 
could change the angle of the cut by lean- 
ing on the saw. The Scars 12-tn. had the 
largest table among the saws we tested, 
but it was made of thin, cast aluminum 
and it didn't project beyond the saw's 

base, so you couldn't clamp shop-made 
fences or jigs to the table. 



42 AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUKE 1944 



Tuning a New Bandsaw 

By Fred Matlack 



Ls 



i 



I 

i 
*■■ 

3 

.•■ 

m 
a 
a 
I 



Whether the nameplate on a new bandsaw says 
"Made In America" or "Made In Taiwan." it will 
probably need a tuneup before it runs as well as it can. 
But don't let that prospect scare you. As we discovered 
in setting up the saws for our bandsaw test (see main 
article), you can T%% many of the minor problems you'll 
encounter if you have just a few basic mechanical skills 
and are willing to invest a little of your time. 

Looking for Big Problems 

The first step in fixing a bandsaw is determining whether 
it's worm the work. If your saw has a visible defect, such 
as a warped table or a cracked casting , you should send it 
back, or make a claim with the shipper if It appears the 
cause was damage during shipment. If critical parts are 
defective, request replacements, and If the dealer won't 
replace the parts, send the saw back. If your saw passes 
these tests, you can look for some specific problems: 

Excessive Vibration — To check for vibration, mount a 
blade on the saw. retract the guides and turn on the saw. 
If the saw vibrates excessively* it could be because of out* 
of-round. out-of-balanee or misaligned wheels, or a prob- 
lem with the drive train. 

There are several ways to check wheels for roundness 
and vertical alignment, (For more on these subjects, see 
"Tuning a Bandsaw." aw #25), But if the wheels appear to 
be more than about %* in. out of round, you should contact 
the manufacturer for a new wheel* If the upper and lower 
wheels aren't aligned In the same planes (co-planar), try 
shimming the wheels to bring them into line, (See aw #25.) 
If you're unable to fix the problem, return the saw. 

Locating the source of drive-train vibration Is a three- 
step process. First, check the motor by removing the drive 
belt and running the motor without the drive pulley 
attached. If the vibration persists, the motor is bad, and 
you should ask the manufacturer for a replacement. If the 
motor runs smoothty, reattach the pulley and run the 
motor again, but without the belt in place. If the pulley 
passes the test r try replacing the belt, if you still have 
vibration, check the pulley on the saw. 

Wheel "End Play"— To test for "end play" (the 
amount of in/out movement on its shaft) remove the 
saw blade* grab the wheel with both hands and push 

FIXING END PLAY IN TOP WHEEL BEARINGS 



Shim here 
with washers 

to close gap. 



WHEEL 



\ 



. Gap causes 
/ end play. 







BALL BEARING 



and pull on it. The wheel shouldn't move more than 
+ 003 or 0.004 in, on its shaft, If end pfay is greater 
than that, you can try adding a shim to take up the 
slack, (See draw- 
ing* below.) 

Wheel Balance — 
Out-of-balance 
wheels can really 
make your saw 
dance across the 
ttoor. Test for bal- 
ance by removing 
the blade and spin- 
ning each wheel by 
hand. (You have to 
remove the drive 
belt to Jet the bot- 
tom wheel spin To balance a bandsaw wheel, drill 
freely.} If the wheel shallow holes inside the rim at the 
settles in one spot heavy points on the wheel, 
consistently, it is 

out of balance. You can try to correct the imbalance by 
drilling shallow holes inside the rim on the heavy side of 
the wheel; (See photo, above.) 
Guide-Post Alignment — Some saws had upper guide 

posts that didn't remain 
parallel to the blade as 
we raised and lowered 
the guides. To check 
your guide post, lower 
the post as far as It wall 
go, lock it in piace and 
adjust the upper guides 
and thrust bearing, so 
that they're close to the 
blade. Then raise the 
post to the top of Its 
range and lock it. If the 
position of the guides 
and the thrust bearing in 
relation to the blade has 
changed, the post is not 
parallel. We were able to 
fix this problem on two 
of our test saws by filing the post clamp that holds the 
post to the saw frame. (See photo h above.) On other saws, 
you might be able to shim the post clamp for a better fit. 

Guide-Post Play — To check for play here, lower the 
post all the way, lock it and move it in all directions, If 
there's so much slop that you get a "clunk-clunk" as the 
post moves in the clamp, the play is excessive. You may 
be able to file the guide- post bracket so you get a better 
fit between the bracket and the post. Otherwise, ask the 
manufacturer for a replacement bracket. 

FRED MATLACK heads the AW design shop. 




By filing the mating surface 
of this post clamp, we improved 
the guide-post a lifin merit on one 
of our test saws. 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 43 












Grizzly G1073 





'"*H)} 



Kity 613 



@ 



1* 



General 490-1 





24S32N 



Mfa 28-245 




Other Factors 

It's worth noting two other factors about 
handsaws. First, most handsaw tables tilt 
45° to the outboard side, but not all tilt 
toward the column. If you want to jig up to 
eul dovetails on your handsaw, make sure 
the tabic will Tilt at least 8° to the left so 
you can cut the pins, (See chart.) 

Second, don't trust blade-tension gauges. 
On most of the test saws that had them, the 
gauges were inaccurate and useful only as a 
rough guide. During our evaluation of the 
larger saws, we tensioncd *^-in. blades to 
the u % in/ reading on the scales and then 
measured the tension using a Lennox blade- 
tension gauge. Blade manufacturers say a V 
in. blade should be tensioncd between 
10, GOO to 15,000 pounds per square in. 
(psi) for cutting wood, but at the "-& in." 
setting, blade tension varied from a low of 
7,000 psi on the Scars 12-in. to a high of 
19,000 psi on the BridgewoocL Most saws 
fell in a range of 8,000 to 10,000 psi. 

Special Features 

We found a few other features worth men- 
tioning. The Dridgewood and Laguna saws 
have foot brakes to stop the blade from 
freewheeling after you turn off the 
motor — a handy safety feature. A large 
"panic button" on the Laguna Lets you turn 
off the saw without groping for a switch. 
The Inca and KJty saws are equipped with 
magnetic switches that prevent their 
motors from turning on unexpectedly if 
you leave the switch in the "on" position 
after a temporary power outage. On the 
other hand, we found the manual switches 
on the General, the Enlon and the Delta 14- 
in. open stand were mounted too low for 
easy accessibility. 

Our Choices 

Because the size and capacities of these 
handsaws vary widely, we can't offer you a 
single recommendation. Instead, we've 
identified several categories of use and 
picked winners in each area. Keep in mind 
[Juu there arc many good saws worth con- 
sidering that didn't make it into our test. 

If you plan to use a handsaw only for 
light-duty cutting and scroll work T a bench- 
top saw is good enough, and we liked the 
Drcmcl hest for its height capacity and 
power. This saw is quite similar to the Skil 
and performed the same, but the Dremel's 
two speeds gave it the edge in our opinion. 

If you're buying a handsaw for all-around 
curve-cutting, ripping and some resawing, 
your best bet is a medium-size saw in the 






12-in, to 15-m range with y h to 114 HP, The 
Kity 12-in. got our vote as best small saw 
because it scored higher than any other saw 
we tested, ran smooth as silk, had plenty of 
power and was very easy to adjust. Among 
the larger saws, the 15-in. General was a 
clear winner. It has a rigid, all-cast-iron 
frame, it ran very smoothly, and it was easy 
to adjust. The Delta 144n. and the Jet also 
performed well, and cost considerably less. 

Heavy-duty resawing or continuous pro- 
duction use requires heavier-duty l64n. and 
18-in. saws: Their larger frames and motors 
can power wider blades. The Bridgewood 
was our top choice in this group due to its 
construction quality, excellent guides, 
relentless power and vib ration-free cutting. 

If you need large throat capacity for tight- 
duty work such as scroUsawing, your best 
option is a three-wheel handsaw, and the 
Inca 710 was tops in this test The fit and 
finish was very good, and the saw had a 20- 
in, throat capacity. Keep in mind, though, 
that it can be tricky to track a blade on a 
three-wheeler. Also, blade life may be short- 
er since the blade has to make sharper 
bends around smaller-diameter wheels. 

Our choices for "best buy" were the 
most difficult, because we considered price 
and performance together. One of our 
picks, the Delta 124n, machine, was a 
tighter-duty saw, It was well-made and had 
good power for Its size. The Grizzly 16-in 
saw got our vote as the best buy amonj 
heavier-duty machines, but with a caveat. 
This saw ran well only after we replaced 
the motor and the guide-post cover and 
installed a missing bushing to keep the 
upper wheel from shifting side-to-side* Still, 
you'd be hard-pressed to find a heavy-duty 
saw as good at this low price. 

Our evaluations showed that, as you'd 
expect, the more expensive saws are manu- 
factured to higher standards. You can figure 
on doing more tuning and tweaking to get 
optimum performance from a lower-priced 
saw. But if you're handy and have more 
time than money to spend, consider buying 
a cheaper saw and fixing it up yourself. 
(See sidebar, p^c 430 A 
Thanks to The Olson Saw Co., (800) 63 
4047, for supplying tbe blades, and 
American Saw and Manufacturing Co, t 

(413) 5253961, for 
supplying tbe blade-ten- 
sion gauge used in am 
testing. 










I DAVE SELLERS is 

assistant editor of A W> 



44 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1094 






. Um-4 



Choosing Bandsaw Blades 

By Jim Cummins 



The bandsaw is a versatile machine, but to help it 
reach peak performance, you need to use the correct 
blade for the job you're doing, Choosing what blade to use 
Is a matter of matching four elements to the Job at hand: 
the tooth profile, the number of teeth, the width of the 
blade and the blade's thickness. Let's look at these ele- 
ments and how they affect a cut. 

Tooth Profile and Number of Teeth 

Bandsaw blades come In the three main tooth profiles 
shown below. The N standard" profile has alternately set 
teeth (often with every third or fifth tooth ground as a 



BASIC BLADES 



For 

Tight Curves 



HOOK AMCL£ 



For 

General Cutting 



HOOK ANGLE 

5* TO 1(T 



For 

Re&awlng 



1 



V 

c 




HOOK ANGLE 




i H in. it 14 TPt 
STANDARD TOOTH 

Blades with 
more teeth 
cut smoother* 



1 4 fau * 6 TFI 
HOOK TOOTH 

Blades with hook 
teeth cut faster. 



H in. x 4 Tpl 
SKIP TOOTH 

Blades with skip 
teeth run cooler 
in thick stock. 



"raker* to clear the kerf and keep the blade running 
straight), " Standard'" blades provide the most stable cuts 
In thinner materials. The "skip" profile Is a standard with 
half as many teeth. This Increases gullet size and 
reduces clogging. The "hook" profile has a slight positive 
hook angle, It cut? more aggressively and requires less 
feed pressure. 

As with any saw blade, the number of teeth in the cut 
will affect how smoothly and quickly you can cut. The 
blades shown in the drawing reflect the general rule that 
you want a blade with more teeth if you're cutting harder 
or thinner materials, and one with larger gullets for softer 
or thicker materials. If you want a blade that will cut faster 
than the ones shown and be less likely to clog, choose a 
blade with fewer teeth, aiming, as in the old carpenter's 
adage , to keep at least three teeth in the cut for stability. 

Blade Width and Thickness 

Cutting curves is one of the bandsaw 's specialties, and 
cutting radius depends primarily on the blade width. (It's 
the back comer of the blade rubbing against the outside 
of the kerf that limits the curve,) As a general rule* a l A-ln. 
blade will cut a curved inside corner smaller than a dime, 



a Vi-in. blade will cut to the size of a quarter, while a %■ 
in. blade will follow the outline of an old silver dollar. 

Blade thickness and the diameter of the wheels on your 
saw contribute to the likelihood a blade will break from 
metal fatigue Instead of Just dulling to the point where it T s 
no longer useful. Most blades break from metal fatigue — - 
constant bending makes the steel brittle — and the smaller 
the wheels on your saw and the thicker the metal in the 
blade , the faster a blade will break- Blade thickness for 
14-ln.. small shop saws shouldn't exceed 0-025 in t 
Small, three-wheel band saws work better with more flexi- 
ble 0.0 14*1 n.*thick blades, while laTger bandsaws can han- 
dle blades up to 0.035 in. thick. 

Re sawing {cutting thick, wide stock into thinner boards) 
is another bandsaw specialty. For straight, smooth resaw- 
ing, wide blades resist cutting pressure and deflect less in 
the cut. If your blade screeches and produces dust rather 
than chips, try using a blade with fewer teeth, and slow the 
saw down. Then restart the cut from the other end of the 
work: Running a new blade down an old kerf quickly dulls It 
by overheating the sharp outside corners of the teeth. 

Blade Recommendations 

If you're wondering which blades you should buy. the three 
shown are a good starting point, but the suppliers listed 
betow carry a wide variety of blade types if you want to 
experiment. Anybody's "favorite" blade depends on exact- 
ly what you're cutting and what you want to pay. AW used 
Olson's standard carbon-steel blades in the bandsaw test 
(see main article) and found they were good, low-cost, all- 
purpose blades. In his own woodworking business. 
Executive Editor Ellis Walentlne has used the AS and PC 
Series blades from Suffolk Machinery and says they pro- 
duce "unbelievably smooth cuts." For an all-around blade, 
I'm partial to the V^in., 6-tooth bimetal blade from 
Lennox, which has a hook tooth and a thickness of 0.025 
in. This blade costs twice as much as the other brands 
mentioned, but it has alloy teeth that resist wear from the 
pieces of particle board, plywood, plastic and bark-covered 
logs that go through my saw. 

JIM CUMMINS is a contributing editor of AW. 



Bandsaw triades are available 
from the following mail-order sources: 

American Saw Mfg. Co. 

301 Chestnut St.. East Longmeadow. MA 01028 

(413) 525*3961 Circle #664 

Carries Lennox blades. 

The Olson Saw Co. 

16 Stony Hill Rd.. me. 6. Bethel. CT 06801 
(flOO) 634-4047 Circle #665 

Suffolk Machinery Corp. 

12 Waverly Ave., Suite 125. Patchogue. NY 11772 
(800) 234-7297 Circte #666 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



4 5 





PHILADELPHIA 

LOWBOY 



^ fyJdmnietetrJ ®> 




This graeeful Qu*en Anne lowboy combines cabinet ma king and carving skills. 



J£ k ne of the most enjoyable aspects 
(/^ of building lSdvccntuiy furniture 

V^ is studying the remarkable diversi- 
ty of design during this period. In each of 
the major localities, 
craftsmen produced fur- 
niture that was distinc- 
tive in line, proportion 
and form, reflecting dif- 
ferences in the tastes and 
ethnic backgrounds of 
both builder and patron. 

This lowboy, or dress- 
ing table, while not an 
exact reproduction, is 
typical of Queen Anne furniture built by 
Philadelphia craftsmen during the early- to 
mid-17Q0s. I based the design on 
Philadelphia examples because I liked the 



Authentic 

Details and Construction 

Grace This 

18th-Century Classic 



rising line of the front apron combined 
with the shallow center drawer. And the 
space outlined by the cabriole legs, knee 
blocks, and apron forms a very graceful, 

almost dancing line that 
is the essence of good 
Queen Anne furniture. 
The carved Mrifid* 
(three-lobe d) feet, the 
crotch'vcncercd drawer 
fronts and the general 
proportions arc also rep- 
resentative of many 
Philadelphia pieces I 



^— have studied. 

If the piece appears somewhat ambU 
tious to you with its carved feet, you can 
substitute turned pad feet for the carved 
ones without destroying the authentic fla- 



S 



vor of the piece. (For more informa- 
tion oil turned feel, see Queen Anne 
Furniture, by Norman Vandal (1990, 
Taunton Press, Box 5506, Ncwuwn, 
CT 06470-5506). Some old piece* 
have carved feet (hall-and-claw or tri- 
fid) on the front legs and the simpler, 
pad feet on the back. 

Making the Carcase 

When building a reproduction I tike 
to strive for authenticity, so I chose 
walnut as the primary wood (for all 
visible surfaces) and poplar for the 
secondary wood, as the original 
maker might have. I made the top of 
the lowboy from just two boards, 
while the sides and back are made 
from single wide boards. The carcase 
is joined by mortises .tud tenons, and 
the drawers bv hand-cut dovetails. All 

■ 

the surfaces are hand-planed and 
scraped, with only minimal hand -sand- 
ing. The result is a piece of furniture 
that Is faithful not only in design but 
in construction. 

The first step in constructing the 
carcase is to make the legs. Begin by 
laying out a full -sized leg pattern on 
thin plywood. (Sec drawing, pages 4H 
and 49.) Then handsaw the pattern 
and sand or spokeshave the edges 
until ihey are smooth and continuous, 
without Hat spots or irregularities. 

Next T prepare 3-in, by 3*in. walnut 
blanks for the legs* Use solid stock if 
possible; if ynu laminate the legs, 
you're Likely to see unattractive glue 
lines on the finished shapes. 

When laying out the legs, orient the 
blanks so thai similar grain will be fac- 
ing the front of the table. Trace your 
leg pattern onto the two adjacent out- 
side faces of each blank, (If ynu plan 
to turn rather than carve the feet, 
mark the centers on both ends of the 
stock prior to bandsawing, and leave 
an extra inch of wood at the top for 
the lathe's drive center,) 

Before cutting out the cabriole 
shapes, lay out and cut the Leg mortis- 
es, I drilled the mortises, then squared 
the comers with a sharp Vin. mortis- 
ing chisel. 

Once you've done the mortising, 
you can focus on cutting and shaping 
the legs. IF you have never made a 
cabriole leg, I recommend you prac- 
tice on some cheap, soft wood such 
as poplar or pine. Cabriole legs are 




To tut compound curve on « cabriole 
leg, author taw* one face, then tapes 
on the oWcuts and cuts adjacent face. 




Author holds leg In a pipe damp held In 
a vi*e so he can shape it with a rasp 
prior to filing and sanding. 

not difficult to make, but I'm sure you 
will feel more comfortable if you 
experiment on something other than 
3-in .-thick walnut. 

Cut the curved shapes of the legs 
with a ' iin. blade un the handsaw, 
sawing close to the layout lines. After 
cutting the first side of each leg, you II 
have to tape the cutoff pieces hack 
into position with masking tape so 
you'll have a square block and lines to 
follow when you make the second 
cut, (Sec top photo,) 

To refine the shape of the legs, I 
mount them in a pipe clamp, then 
mount the clamp in a vise. 1 use a rasp 



to round the corners of the legs and to 
remove saw marks and irregularities 
left by the handsaw, (Sec bottom 
photo.) Many colonial craftsmen used 
spokeshaves for this step. (See aw 
*35.) Work cautiously and try to pro- 
duce smooth, flowing curves. Don't 
work on the square, top sections 
(called "post blocks") at this point — 
you'll do that after gluing up the case, 
When you're satisfied with the general 
shape of the legs, switch to a file, then 
to scrapers and finally sandpaper, fin- 
ishing up with 220 grit. 

The next step is to carve the 
feet. This lowboy has four carved tri- 
fid feet, with carved grooves, or 
"stockings/ that extend pan way up 
the legs. My method of carving this 
foot design is shown in the photos on 
pages 50 and 5 1 . 

Once the legs and feet are complet- 
ed, you can move on to the case join- 
cry. Dimension the back and sides, 
the front rails and the front apron. 
Note that the center rail is % in. high 
and 1% in, deep to strengthen the 
case. Leave the sides and front apron 
square at this point. You'll cut the 
decorative profiles later. (Sec draw- 
ing,) Cut tenons on these pieces to fit 
the mortises in the legs. 

Note how the side and back joints 
are each divided into three separate 
mortises and tenons. This method is 
technically stronger than a single full- 
width tenon, because the wood 
remaining between the mortises helps 
to maintain the integrity of the leg. To 
allow for seasonal wood movement of 
tile sides and back, you need to make 
their tenons slightly narrower than 
the heights of the mortises. I don't 
peg these joints as many colonial cabi- 
netmakers did. Pegs inhibit wood 
movement, sometimes causing the 
boards to crack or split. 

When you've finished the leg joints, 
the next step is to make the six drawer 
guides and the drawer runners, (See 
drawing.) You'll also need to make two 
"kickers" to keep the top and center 
draw r crs from tipping as you pull them 
out. Note that the top drawer runners 
also act as kickers for the left and right 
bottom drawers. 

The drawer guides and runners can 
be made in one of two ways. The first 
is to rah bet thick stock to form the 
drawer runners. I prefer instead to 



AMERICAN WOODWORK Eft 



JUNE 1994 



47 



FRONT ELEVATION 




SIDE ELEVATION 
21 



BILL OF MATERIALS 




PART 


QfTY. 


DIMENSIONS 


T«P 


1 


3 /4 i 21 x 34 


Front Molding 


1 


1iLi32 


Side Moldings 


2 


lx 1x20 


lag« 


4 


2 l A* &k x 29 V4 


KeeeEBocas 


• 


2 1 Ax2 3 Ai2fr 


Top Rail 


1 


T * 1 l 3 * 1 2aV« 


Canter Rai 


1 


lV* x 7 A k 2**74 


Apron 


1 


7 /b x 5 *fc x 2S 1 1 


Vertical Dividers 


2 


r A x 1 x 3$* 


Mm 


2 


ft I 14Vl x 1 6' 4 


Back* 


1 


I /ixl4 1 Ax2aVi 


Center Drawer 


2 


1 x 3 J A x 17 


Glfld« a 






Side Drawer 


4 


T A x l 3 /i x 14*A 


Guhta* 






Upper Drawer 


2 


V&Vaiis 3 * 


Rumen' 






Lower Drawer 


• 


^x'AxlS 1 ^ 


Runners' 






Top Drawer Kicker* 


1 


*A 1 1 1 /! x 17 


Center Drawer 


1 


*M x lto x 16'A 


Kkl*r* 






Top Drawer 






Front 


1 


%tiitexxi 


Sides' 


2 


1 ^ 1 3 5 /is i 16 1 --7 


Back" 


1 


1 Ax2"A«x2* 7 A* 


Bottom* 


1 


x h x lflrMl 1 2S u /ie 


Center Drawer 






Front 


1 


"AsiSVsxli 1 /* 


aaaW 


2 


l hx2 u Aixl% l h 


Bade* 


1 


bi2 5 :6i-n ] ^6 


Bottom' 


1 


te x ie^* x lrf** 


Bottom Drawers 






Front 


2 


"AixSVix? 1 * 


ami 


4 


to x 4 U A* x lS'A 


Sack* 


2 


*A x 4*Ai x 6*Ai 


Bottom* 


2 


1 AKlG l A«x5 < *At 


Maoe trofti poplafi 







U.U5TW,mm \it EGG UFQIfcfTt 



■Mortis* 
back p, 



Nail and glue 
runners to dra 



Glue knee block to leg after 
carcase is assembled. 



Owe hrjtows wKh #7 

spoon-bent gouge. 



40 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1094 



TOP EDGE AND MOLDING DETAIL 



tickers into 

tel and front rails. 




er guides. 



Screw bottom to bodt 
through slotted hole. 



TRIFIO FOOTPRINT 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1094 49 



CARVING A TRIFID FOOT 






STEP 1: Cut a cardboard footprint pat* 
tern (see drawing) with the carving 
gouge you plan to use— in this case a 
^in.-wlde, its gouge. Trace the pat- 
tern on the end grain of the teg. 



STEP 2: Carve from the top edge of the 
feet toward your pattern tine. Make 
your cuts parattei to the bandsawn 
edges of the feet 



STEP 3: Lay out the hollows between 
the toes with a pencil. The hollows 
extend partway up the leg to form the 
'^stocking." 



use thinner stock and attach separate 
runners with brads and glue, so I can 
adjust them as needed. (See drawing.) 
In any case, make sure the tops of the 
drawer runners are flush with the 
openings in the carcase when every* 
thing is assembled. I fastened the side 
drawer guides to the case sides with 
screws, although on many old pieces 
these guides were nailed into place. 

The center drawer guides and kick- 
ers arc mortised into the inside of the 
back panel and front apron, (Sec 
drawing.) To locate the mortises* use 
one of the front legs as a "story pole 1 * 
to transfer the rati locations to the 
back panel, then determine the run- 
tier and kicker locations. This old 
method is faster and less error-prone 
than measuring and laying out each 
separate mortise. Some old pieces 
were through-mortised, but 1 think it 
is unattractive and unnecessary, Next, 
mortise the front ends of the center 
lockers into the top and center rails as 
shown in the drawing. 

When you've completed the case 




ally an asse[ when gluing larger, more 
complicated assemblies. 

Once the glue has dried, trim the 
rough, bandsawn faces of the post 
blocks flush with the hack and sides. 
You can do this with a razor-sharp 
low-angle block plane. Adjust the 
plane s throat for a thin shaving and 
angle the plane at 45° to the grain 
direction. This will give you a smooth 
cut and prevent tcar-out- 

The knee blocks (sometimes called 
"transition blocks") connect the legs 
visually to the apron and sides while 



When gluing the sub~astem biles, author 
uses shaped glue blocks to center 
clamping pressure on the joints. 



joinery, make a dry run of each sub- 
assembly — sides, front, and back. 
Check for flatness, squareness and 
twist, and make any necessary adjust- 
ments. Then lay out and handsaw the 
decorative profiles on the front apron 
and cabinet sides, (See drawing.) 

Next, glue up the front and back 
sub-assemblies with yellow glue and 
check everything once again. Even 
when your joinery is neat and accu- 
rate, it's possible to clamp pieces out 

of square. Use glue blocks to center "transition blocks') connect the legs 
clamping pressure on the joints, This 
should keep the Leg 
posts in the same 
plane, but you 
should check with a 

straightedge just to 

he sure. 

Now you're ready 
to glue up the 
whole case. It might 
be wise to have 
someone help you 
with the process 
because of all the 
pieces involved, 
Don't overlook a dry 
run: tt is crucial to 
foresee problems 
and locate the best 
positions for clamps. 

For this gluing 
step, you may also 

want to use white 

glue instead of yel- ^BQpp 

low glue. White 

glue is not quite as 

Strong, but its slow- Drawer fronts are joined to the sides with half-bind dovetails. 

er setup time is usu- Note that the bottom edges of the drawers an not lipped* 




so 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1904 





STEP 4; Carre the hollows and round* 
with a 1 /b4n.~wid* t #7 tpoon4/ent 
gouge, and switch to m */+4n*~wide t §7 
spoon-bent gouge mm the hollows narrow 
at the ankle. 



FINISHED FOOT: After Banding and fin- 
ishing, the stocking and the tops of the 
toes are crisply defined, as these two 
views show. 



adding some rigidity to the structure 
You make the knee blocks like you 
make the legs, culling them to approx- 
imate shape on the bandsaw, then tap- 
ing the scraps from your first cuts in 
place before sawing the other profile. 

I joined the knee blocks to the tegs 
using an old-fashioned technique 
called a "rubbed 1 ' glue joint, mostly 
so I wouldn't have to clamp these 
oddly shaped pieces. I first applied 
glue tO the side of each knee block, 
then rubbed the glued surface 
against the mating leg surface until 
the glue "tacked/ Sometimes on old 
pieces, a single nail was used to rein- 
force this pint. 

After you've glued the knee blocks 
into place, shape them with your 
rasps and carving tools so they blend 
seamlessly into the leg profiles. 

Making the Drawers 
Now, turn your attention to making 

the drawers. Mine are typical for the 
period, with half-blind dovetails in the 
front and through dovetails in the 
back. (For more on cutting half-blind 
dovetails, see aw *29.) Make the draw- 
ers about Ha in, narrower and shorter 
than the openings, so they won't bind 
in humid weather. 

The drawer bottoms are solid 
poplar with the grain running side -to- 
side to allow the inevitable expansion 
and contraction to occur at the backs 
of the drawers. Fasten the bottoms to 
the drawer backs with screws 
through slotted holes, (See photo, 
above right.) 

The dower fronts arc an ideal loca- 



tion to display figured wood. You can 
make solid fronts, or you can resaw 
your fancy walnut into thick veneer 
and glue it to ordinary walnut, as I did 
here with some choice crotch walnut 
I'd been saving. 

When re sawing, I started with a 
thicknessed board. Then 1 alternated 
between resawing and jointing so I'd 
always have a smooth surface to ride 
against the fence and for gluing to my 
drawer fronts. This wa>\ each piece 
had one planed face and one band- 
sawn face. I glued the planed faces of 




Author attaches drawer bottom to back 
with a screw. Slotted hole permit* bot- 
tom to move . 

the veneers to -^Hn.-thick walnut, then 
scraped and sanded the fronts to !t<, 
in. to remove the bandsaw marks. 
(Sec drawing.) 

There arc no hard-and-fast rules for 
composing the grain of the drawer 
fronts. Whether you use matched or 
unmatched wood, solid stock or 
veneer, arrange your drawer fronts in 
the way that is most pleasing to you. 

My drawer fronts are lipped on the 



top and two sides and have a decora- 
tive thumbnail edge on the front, (See 
drawing.) The lip on the bottom edge 
was probably omitted for conve- 
nience when cutting grooves for the 
drawer bottoms — one plow plane 
setup could be used for both the 
fronts and sides of the drawers, saving 
time and decreasing the chances for 
error. The same holds true today, 
even though you're more likely to cut 
the grooves with a tablesaw than with 
a wooden plow plane 

Making the Top 

I made the top List, mainly because I 
was concerned that it would warp if I 
left it lying around the shop for too 
long. After gluing up the two-hoard 
top and scraping it flat with a cabinet 
scraper, I cut the profile on die front 
and side edges (see drawing) with 
shaper knives that I ground myself 
(sec aw *35), but you can approxi- 
mate this shape with standard shaper 
or router cutters. 

The molding under the top can also 
be made with either of the above 
methods or with wooden molding 
planes. Attach the moldings with 
screws from inside the case. Then 



-±£- 






SUttWS IIUJI1 I11MUL tilt L.13C, I JILJI 

attach the top to the case with 
screws mounted in pocket holes on 
the inside of the case. Make the clear- 
ance holes a bit sloppy so the top will 
be able to expand and contract with 
the seasons, 

Finishing Up 

After assembling the case, 1 test-mount- 
ed the drawer pulls and escutcheons 
(available from BaU and Ball, 463 W. 
Lincoln Highway, Exton, PA 19341* 
215*363-7330; Hem *C 1 9-057), and 
then 1 removed them for finishing. 

My finish consisted of one coat of 
tung oil to bring out the rich color of 
the air-dried walnut, followed by sever- 
al thin coats of orange shellac, I rubbed 
the final coat to a satin sheen with min- 
eral oil and pumice 
before completing 
the job with a thin 
coat of brown shoe 
polish. A 

\ LONNIE BIRD 

makes reproduction furniture and 
teaches wood working at the 
University of Rio Grande in Ohio, 




AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1 904 



91 



Designing Beyond 




By Albert LeCoff 



,*t 



"And Tom arrow Weeps In a Blind Cage' 

To achieve the cage like effect in this turning, John Wooller, 
a native of Victoria, Australia, turned a piece of jarrah burl 
from both sides, relocating its axis between turnings. 

WtO tO Vt Q4Y1D sru£r 



Webster's dictionary defines a turner as "a person 
who shapes objects on the lathe.* But as the 
pieces pictured here show, today's turners are 
using the lathe as \mx one part of the whole process of mak- 
ing. This work t from the latest International Lathe-Turned 
Objects exhibit, "Challenge V," demonstrates how turners 
are combining design, manipulation of the materials and 
machine, and finishing with traditional turning techniques 
io create unique objects. 

The original ""Challenge'" show in 1987 encouraged rurnets 
to make objects irrespective of their marketability The results 
were mostly decorative versions of traditional objects. Since 
then, the artists have responded in subsequent ChaUenges by 
stretching our understanding of what's possible on the lathe 
with increasingly sophisticated planning and execution. 

This exhibit was organised by the Wood Turning Center 
of Philadelphia and opened at the Herman Museum in 
Coltegeviile, Pennsylvania, in January, lc will be on display at 
the Fine Arts Museum of the SouLh in Mobile, Alabama, 
through June 12, and will continue to tour the U.S. until 
February 1997. (Watch "Calendar* for show dates and 
places.) A 

ALBERT LECOFF is Executive Director of the Wouti 
Turning Center in Pbiladetphia. 

"Evolving Eggi III" 

Stephen Hughes of Aspen dale 

Gardens, Australia, turned 

and carved this 2-ft,-tafl egg 

from Huon pine, then embellished 

it with dog hair and linen thread. 

PHOTO SY «N HAnftS 



"Matrix 1" 

To prevent splintering, Richard 

Hooper of Liverpool, England, glued 

together the crisscrossed ramin-wood 

sticks in this piece, then froze the 

blank and turned it while it was still an 

iced block. 

FHOTO AT" JOHN CAIUAMO 








32 AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 19^4 




-L//\ 1 JTTlrli of Turned \A 



the Limits 
Work 




"Suspended Sphere Variation" 

Todd Hoyer of Bisbee, Arizona, 

turned this shape between centers 

from a single cedar log. First, he 

mounted the Jog horizontally to 

texture the exterior Then he shaped 

the hall by mounting the log 

on two vertical axes and wasting 

the area between the "legs." 



"Earth Offering" 

Ron Ffeming of Tulsa, Oklahoma, first 
turned off center to rough out most of 
the bowl shape on this piece of 
buckeye burl. Then he hand-carved 
the feaf work. Thin walls on the bowJ 
prevent the piece from tipping over. 



PHOTO ftV RON FLIMNC 



"Passion Fire" 

Frank Cummings lit of Long Beach, 
California, turned this piece of pink 
ivory wood, then sliced off the top 
section and carved the lacework. 
He used gold posts adorned with 
garnets and pearls to reattach the 
top to the vessel. 

photo err hunk cummincj 






"White Pine 
Mosaic BowJ" 

Phil Moulthrop of 
Marietta, Georgia, 
created this 21 Vi- 
irt.-dia. turning by 
epoxying sections 
of pine onto the 
outside of a turned 
bowl He then 
turned the interior 
to waste the initial 
bowl, leaving an 
epoxy-fnlaid vessel 

KIOTO FV PHIl M0UL1 HftO* 










"Broken Wave Pattern" 

After turning this birch dish, Alan Stirt 
of Enosburg, Vermont, ebonized the 
rim and then carved through to reveal 
the wood's natural color. 



PHOTO Bt'AJJUM JTWT 



"Mix Master 

Johannes Michelsen of Manchester 
Center, Vermont, made this functional 
spalted- maple hat by turning it green 
and bending it to shape over a form. 
Tangential shrinkage helped create 
the hat's oval, head-fitting shape. 

niOTO BY JOHANNES MICIKLSEM 




AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 



93 





Fill HE 



These Professional Techniques Give four Work Warmth, 
Depth and Character That Stain Alone Can't Match 




Hie technique! of ground staining, pore filling, dry brushing (shown here) and wet 
glazing can add character to your finishes. 



I y MIchiBl D r • i d ■ e r 

"Can you mutch this finish?" asked the 
overdressed matron as she handed my 
partner, Gary, a drawer from a buffet, 
She wanted ihe same finish on her 
dining table, which was, at that 
moment, sitting in the center of our 
finishing shop. 

"Surer he answered brightly, 
"Well call you when its done," The 
drawer had one of those multi-layered 
commercial finishes you often see in 
furniture stores 

"Do you know how to match this 
finish?" J asked Gary, somewhat 
incredulous. "No," he answered calm- 
ly, "but I'm sure we can figure it out. 
After all how tough can it be?" 

Gary and I were young and eager at 
that time, aod wc needed all the 
work we could get. In the end, the 
job turned out to be tougher than 
expected, as fit explain later. But it 
w.is well worth it, because it intro- 
duced us to the world of what I call 
"multi-step finishes," 

Multi-step finishes are wood treat- 
ments that go beyond merely staining 
and sealing. They are a bit more diffi- 
cult than standard finishes, but they 
also yield more distinctive and gratify- 
ing results. 

What sets them apart is a group of 
techniques that allow you to "layer 
on" the color. You use color very 
selectively, putting it between coats 
of finish, or only in the wood pores, 
or perhaps only in certain art:is to add 
more depth and character to the 
wood. It's similar to the way a four* 
color printing press would print a pic- 
ture of a walnut board, The press 
would lay down a pattern of yellow, 
then a pattern of cyan , then magenta, 
then black. The end result would he a 
picture of brown wuod. even though 
no brown ink w T as used. Similarly, a 
layered wood finish might be brown, 
but it will look very different from 
one with just a simple brown stain. 
(See photos, opposite.) 

In this article I'll introduce you to 
ground staining, pore filling, dry 
brushing, and wet glazing — four tech- 
niques that you can use in various 
combinations to create a surprising 
array of multi-layer finishes. Then I'll 
share three of my favorite multi-layer 
finishes with you, 



-3 



I 



S4 AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



— k 



face in addition to filling the pores 
wiih color. 

Bui you may warn to color only 
the pores, especially if you've just 
gone to the effort of ground staining 
the wood. To do this, seal the wood 
after the ground stain dries with a 
thin wash coat of a scaler that's com- 
patible with your intended top coat. 
I usually use shellac, Si nee it dries 
quickly, it "seals in" most dyes (alco- 
hol dyes may bleed), and It's compat- 
ible with most finishes. Start with a 
very thin (1 -pound -cut) shellac mix* 
lure, and either spray or wipe it on. 
To wipe it. I dip a cotton rag into the 
mixture, wet the surface of the 



GROUND 
STAIN 



GROUND STAIN 
& GLAZE 



ORDINARY 
PIGMENT STAIN 



Ground Staining 
A "ground stain " is any stain you apply 
to add background color prior to other 
coloring steps. Often, this ground stain 
will bear little resemblance to the 
intended final color but instead will 
add highlights, depth or contrast 
under later "glaze" (stain) coats. 

For example, I use bright yellow 
stain on mahogany to kill the natural 
pinkish cast of the wood. (See sidebar, 
"Cordovan Mahogany Finish/ page 
57.) Later, when I glaze the mahogany 
with reddish-brown stain, the yellow 
will work with the glaze to make the 
wood look deeper and mure translu- 
cent. Similarly, a reddish -orange 
ground stain will eliminate 
the gray cast that is com- 
mon to black walnut. (See 
sidebar, "Classic Walnut 
Finish/ page 56.) 

A ground stain can also 
make a piece of furniture 
appear more uniform by 
blending the colors of dis- 
similar boards. 1 frequently 
use an amber ground stain 
on oak, birch, poplar and 
cherry pieces to blend and 
brighten the wood below 
the glaze coat, 

I prefer dye stains to pig- 
mented oil stains for 
ground staining, because 
thev tint the wood without 
hiding or muddying it. And 
although any dye stain will 
work as a ground stain, I 
prefer water-soluble dyes. 
They rarely fade, ihey pen- 
etrate deeply, and they 
give me ample working 
time. I find that oil-soluble 
dves fade too fast, and alco- 

hoi -soluble dyes dry too A ground stain (left) folk* wed by a glaze (center J produces a 
quickly. (For more on dye richer looking finish than ordinary pigment stain (right) on wood, 
stains, see "Just Finishing," 



piece of coarse burlap, and allow it to 
dry completely. 

In two or three days, when the 
pore filler is completely dry, scuff the 
surface lightly with 320-ftrit paper to 
remove any filler residue from atop 
the sealer. If you cut through your 
ground stain, touch it up before you 
go on. Water-soluble dye stains arc 
especially easy to repair. Since they 
don't stain through shellac, you can 
simply wipe die original ground stain 
over the spot and w r ipc off the excess 
immediately. The dye will stain the 
abraded area without affecting the 
surrounding, sealed wood. 



CHERRY 




aw #25.) 

Pore Riling 
Pore filler, usually known as * paste 
wood filler, 1 ' is a thick, semi-paste 
material used for filling the large 
pores of woods such as mahogany 
and walnut, (See "Just Finishing," aw 
#27.) Normally, pore fillers contain 
colored pigments. On raw wood, 
these pigments act likt- a weak, pig- 
mented stain, tinting the wood's sur- 



wood. then immediately wipe <jff the 

excess. The small amount of shellac 
that soaks in will prevent the pig- 
ment from adding too much color to 
the wood. 

After the shellac has dried for at 
least an hour or two, thin the filler to 
the consistency of heavy cream and 
brush a coat onto the sealed wood. 
Wait until the solvent flashes off and 
the filler Loses its wet look. Then wipe 
off the filler across the grain with a 



Dry Brushing 

Dry brushing is a technique 
used by finishers to selec- 
tively add "dirT to a piece of 
furniture, to simulate age or 
simply enhance the charac- 
ter of a piece. The dry brush 
can highlight carvings, flutes 
or raised panels by leaving 
dark lines on the sharp edges 
of such details. I also use dry 
brushing to create shadowy 
"cathedral" patterns (like the 
growth rings of flatsawn 
wood) (see lead photo) on 
wood that nature has left just 
a little too plain. I can even 
coax a bland piece of lauan 
to masquerade as rich 
mahogany. 

The basic technique in 
dry brushing is to lightly 
load a brush with almost-dry 
pigmented stain, then drag 
it across a less-than-smooth 
surface such as raw wood 
or a heavily pigmented under 
coater such as flat paint. As 
the bristles catch on edges, 
high spots or pore open- 
ings, a random pattern of 

pigment, is deposited. 

Your choice of color depends on 
the effect you want. E : or natural -look- 
ing cathedra] patterns, for example, 
use a color you'd expect to find 
there — usually a darker shade of the 
overall wood color, For special 
effects, use whatever color suits you. I 
prefer to use Japan colors (see 
Sources) for dry brushing because 
they are much more concentrated 
than regular pigmented stains. 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



CLASSIC WALNUT FINISH 

Every now and then you come across a piece of walnut 
that just sings with co(oi\ The highlights glow with an under- 
tone of warm reddish browns, and each sweeping cathedra! 
pattern defines itself with a slight change in hue. Of course, 
the rest of the time you are forced to make do with black 
wainut that is gray and monochromatic. When that hap- 
pens, try evening the odds with this finishing technique. 

The trick is to tint the "cathedrals" of your walnut to 
simulate the varied hues of air-dried wood. For this you'll 
need to mix two alcohol-soluble dyes, one reddish brown 
and the other with a greenish-brown tint (Note: If you've 
sealed with shellac, mix the dye powder in a minimum of 
alcohol, and after you've dissolved and strained the dye 
mix. add an equal part of water to prevent the alcohol 
from completely red is solving the shellac sealer.) 

STB* 1: Ground stain the gray walnut with a weak 
orange dye. 




HI if* 2- Seal the wood with a coat of shellac, lacquer 
or varnish. 



3: Dip a Q-tip or 
a small cotton cloth pad 
into the reddish dye. 
Carefully color several 
of the "cathedrals," 
Skipping some in 
between. The dye will 
dry almost immediately. 




STEPS 3 &4 



STEP 4: Color some of 
the undyed cathedrals 
with the greenish dye. Don't do every other one — it will 
look too contrived. You can also try coloring some with 
both red and green, if you put on too much color, lighten 
It by gently rubbing It with steel wool. Make sure you 
blow off nil the steel wool fibers before yog put on the 
next coat of finish. 



5: Apply one or two top coats of the same finish 
you used for sealing. The finished result is shown 
below, — M.D. 





When dry brushing, 
author first "loads" 
his brush by scrubbing 
the bristles through 
th« stain (loft). Then 
ho lightly brushes the 
desired patterns onto 
the surface of the work' 
piece (below). 




Mixing the stain fur dry hrushing is simple. Just thin the 
Japan color with naphtha until it is the consistency of 
heavy cream. Then, put a dollop of color onto a scrap 
board with a small brush. 

For the dry brush itself. I prefer a 2 -in. double-thick 
China bristle. The hog s hair in a China-bristle brush offers 
just the right amount of spring for dry brushing. To load 
your brush 1 scrub the tips of the bristles through the stain 
in a circular motion until the surface of the blob looks dry, 
(See top photo,) Now the brush is "loaded " 

To apply the color, pass the brush in a gentle sweeping 
motion over the areas you want to darken. (See above 
photo.) Work the flat areas first, saving the sharp edges for 
when the brush is almost ready 10 reload, Tf you get harsh 
streaks, your brush is too wet. Scrub off the offending 
streaks with steel wool, then go back to the scrap hoard 
and scrub the bristles a bit more, until the stain is dryer, 
before trying again. 

Wet Glazing 

Wet glazing is the process of wiping a dark stain onto 
sealed wood and ihen selectively wiping off some of the 
color. The stain (called "glaze"' when used this way) cannot 
penetrate through the sealer. Instead, it sits on top, where 
it can be manipulated into whatever patterns you desire. 
You can also "float" the color between layers of lacquer or 
varnish. This lets each glaze layer act as a transparent color 
"filter, 7 " producing a deeper, livelier appearance than a sin- 
gle*color stain coat; (See photo t page SS.) 



56 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1394 



While dry brushing darkens raised or sharp edges on fur- 
niture, wet glazing liighlighls by adding color to the rcccs* 
es + YouVe probably seen the classic "antique white" finish, 
produced by wiping a raw umber ghizc over white paint. 
Wlien the glaze is wiped off, the low areas and inside cor- 
ners are left darkened. The same technique works with 
wood'tonc finishes; in this case, a dark glaze is applied 
over a lighter wood or stain. You can also add a uniform 
film of color over an entire surface by wiping on an even 
coat of glaze. 

Almost any type of pigmented or dye stain may he used 
for glazing, but certain materials work better than others. In 
general, a glaze should have a moderately long "open" 
(working) lime, so you can work it before it dries, and its 
color should be fairly intense so that it will color well t even 
in a very thin layer. Ir also helps if it is thin enough to flow, 
but not so thin that it runs when you want it to stay put, 
Here are the formulas for some of my favorite glazes: 
•Japan or oil glaze: Use Japan pigments or artists* oil col- 
ors h and start with any color or combination of colors. Mix 
with an equal amount of boiled (not raw) linseed oil. and 
reduce the mixture with mineral spirits until it is the con- 
sistency of light cream- 

Depending on how larjie or complicated a piece you are 
glazing, you might want to change the drying time of the 
glaze. To slow it down, use more oil and less mineral spir- 
its, To speed it up, use naphtha instead of mineral spirits 
and reduce the amount of linseed oil, For a really fast glaze, 
omit the oil entirely. Remember, the lunger the open time, 
the more drying time it will need before you can apply a 
tcip coat over it, 

• Asphaltum: By far my favorite glaze, asphaltum is made 
of either gilsonite, petroleum "bottoms/ or both. Gllsonlte 
is a dark brown mineral that comes from one mine in Utah. 
Petroleum bottoms arc the remains from the petroleum dis- 
tillation process. Since both these substances are hard to 
find, your best bet is to buy some fiber-free roofing tar (it's 
the same as asphaltum) at your local hardware store or 
building supply center. Asphaltum makes a rich brown, 
semi transparent glaze with overtones of both green and 
red. It always reminds me of the rainbows that show up on 
oily puddles after a hard rain. 

Asphaltum glaze is made and modified just like Japan 
glaze, but I usually start with two parts asphaltum to one 
part linseed oil. 




CORDOVAN MAHOGANY 



For an elegant Old-World look on mahogany, this high- 
gloss, filled-pore finish is just the ticket. 'Cordovan 
Mahogany" involves a stain, a pore fiUer H dry brushing 
and one or two glaze coats. The secret Is the yellow 
ground stain that makes an otherwise dark and forebod- 
ing finish glow with inner highlights, even on rather unex- 
citing wood, 

STEP 1 : Ground stain your wood with a light yellow dye 
stain. 





STB* 2: Dry brush some character into the wood with 
some VanDyke brown, adding "cathedrals," "ribbons" 
(the appearance of interlocking grain} or highlights. (See 
photo, opposite page.) 

STEP S: Seal the wood with a coat of lacquer or 2- 
pound-cut shellac, and allow it to dry. 

STEP 4: Fill the pores with a dark purplish-brown filler. 





STEP4 




■ 



STEP 6: Seal the wood again. 

STEP 0: Glaze with two thin coats of burnt umber 
Japan glaze (If you're using sneiiac) or asphaltum glaze 
(If you're using lacquer). 




Author adds a wood grain effect by lightly wiping fine steel 
wool through a thin coat of wot glaze 



7: Build on several coats of finish until the pores 
are filled level, then buff to a high gloss. — M.D. 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A- JUNE 1994 57 



GOLDBU OAK FINISH 

'Golden Oak" Is a low-luster, open-pore finish I pro- 
duce with one stain and one glaze. This finish brings 
out the best qualities of oak by reproducing the time- 
less look of rich, aged shellac, I learned about Golden 
Oak when I first started finishing down in South Florida, 
At the time, it was wildly popular among the many trans- 
planted Northerners who had grown weary of the dark, 
"sophisticated" woodwork of their sunless New York 
City digs. 

You can use either lacquer or varnish for your sealer 
and top coat. Ironically, shellac does not work well as a 
sealer here, because it's incompatible with the asphal- 
tum glaze. 



wick 1; Ground stain the wood with a water- or alcohol- 
soluble dye in a sunny golden color. I use Clearwater's 
"Golden Oak,' 



RAW WOOD 




STFP 1 




2: When the ground stain is dry, seal the wood 
with a sprayed coat of lacquer or a brushed coat of var- 
nish and let it dry completely. 



a: Apply a thin, even coat of asphaltum glaze. 
Allow it to dry overnight. 




4: Topcoat with the same finish you used in Step 2. 



G: Rub the finish to a satin luster. (See "Just 
Finishing," page 76.) — M.D. 



SOURCES 

Dye stains, bru*he* r pore fillers, Japan colors, Clearwater 
Color stains and other finishing supplies are available from: 



GARRETT WADE 

161 Avenue of the Americas 
Now York, MY 10013 

(600) 221-2942 



WOODWORKER'S SUPPLY 
OF HEW MEXICO 

5604 Alameda Place NE 

Albuquerque, NM 87113 

(000) 645-9292 

ftrcfc #634 



■ Dye glazes: To make a dye glaze, dissolve oil-soluble dye 
powder in mineral spirits, then add it to boiled linseed oil. 
My favorite dye glaze, though, is Clearwater Color Co. 
water-based stain, straight out of the container. 

The easiest way to apply a glaze is to simply wipe it 
on and wipe it off. Trie small amount of dye or pigment 
that remains will add a thin layer of color. For more of a 
wood-grain effect, try' running a piece of steel wool or 
nylon abrasive pad lightly through the glaze while it is still 
wet. (See photo, page 57.) This works well on flat surfaces, 
but carved legs, fluted columns and raised panels will end 
up with more color in the low areas. If you want to make 
the color even, use a brush to move the glaze out of the 
recesses and distribute it on the lighter areas. I like to work 
with a clean, 2-in, China-bristle brush (the same type I use 
for dry brushing). Brush from the darker areas to the 
Lighter, and the bristles will lift off glaze and move it 
around. When the brush gets so loaded with color that it 
adds glaze instead of removing it, wipe off the bristles into 
a dry cotton rag. 

You can continue to "work" the glaze until it ta even — or 
uneven — enough to suit you. If the glaze starts to dry while 
you're working it, simply re-wet the surface with more 
glaze. The beauty of glazing is that you can redo it as many 
times as you like, and if you're not satisfied with the result, 
you can wipe it all off and start over. 

It's important to keep each coat of glaze color thin. 
Leaving too thick a layer of glaze can cause subsequent fin- 
ishes to peel or delaminatc. When in doubt, apply your 
glaze in two or more layers, with a thin coat of your cho- 
sen finish after each one. 

Be sure to allow plenty of drying time for your glaze, I 
always allow the oil-based glazes to dry overnight before I 
topcoat. The water-based Clearwater gels dry in about an 
hour. After topcoat ing, scuff the surface very lightly with 
320-grit self-lubricating (siearated) sandpaper before apply- 
ing the final coat of finish, This wiil remove any dust nibs 
that ma) have settled into the glaze. 

Incidentally, this wet glaze method is how Gary and 
I solved the pmhlcm of the dining-room table 1 mentioned 
at the beginning of the article, It wasn't tough to do, but to 
tell the truth, we never did figure it out ourselves, The 
next morning, another local finisher— one with many more 

years of experience— stopped by and 
showed us how to glaze that table. In fin- 
ishing, good brushes and good materials 
are important, but they don't hold a can- 
dle to good friends, A 

MICHAEL DRESDNER is a 

finishing consultant and a contributing editor of A W. 







58 AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 




I 

6 



In Rob Tar tile's shop, the bench 
hold^down reigns supreme, 
Whether he's chopping mortises 
on one of his 17th-century repro- 
ductions, planing wavy boards or 
even cutting dovetails! Tarule relies 
on the power of a crook-necked iron 
hold-down to clamp the wood tightly 
to the bench. Nn vise needed here 

"For the type of work I do, the 
hold-down is fast/ he explains. "And 
for chopping rough mortises as the 
17th-century joiners did, no question, 
holding a workpicce to the bench top 
with a hold-down gives me more sup- 
port than a vise would." 

While you might not be tempted to 
abandon your modern vise for the 
simplicity of Rob's ancient wood- 
working system , there are still plenty 
of good reasons to mount a hold- 
down on your workbench, A hold- 
down can grip a workpiece at the 
center of the bench where it's hard 
to apply force with a standard vise or 
bar clamp. It can hold a wide board 
so you can run molding on the out- 
side edge. It can grasp an odd shaped 
carving blank or cabriole leg so you 
can work it from several locations cm 
the bench. And many hold-downs are 



quicker to adjust than 

a clamp or a bench vise, 



An Ancient Tool 

Hold-downs have been around since 
the time of the Romans, and they pre- 
date vises. The traditional hold-down 
was just an iron bar formed in the 
shape of a shepherd's crook. {See 
photo > page 62) To use it, you 
dropped the shank in a hole in your 
bench and put the workpiece under 
the crooked end. Rapping the crook 
with a mallet caused the shank to jam 
In the hole and clamp the workpiece. 
Piece of cake. 

In fact* the design worked so well 
that many of today s dozen-plus bench 
hold-downs are simply variations of 
this old device. But there have been 
some ingenious improvements, too. 
To see how the old and new hold- 
downs compare, I tested a group in 
our workshop. I checked how easy 
each is to mount to a 2-in .-thick bench- 
top, how well each grips stock of vary- 
ing thickness and shape, and how 
quickly each clamps and disengages. 
Tli en, to see how well each resisted 
shock, lateral pressure and rotational 
pressure, I planed, carved and 



chopped dovetails, Including 
working parallel to the bench to chop 
out the end grain. Specific comments 
appear on pages 60 to 62, but first let 
me offer a few overall observations; 
•In general I found hold-downs that 
apply clamping pressure directly over 
the workpiece, such as the Jorgcnscn 

(see page 60), provide more force 
than those with long lever arms, like 
the Record on page 61 . 
•A hold-down's profile will affect how 
easy it is to use. You can't use hold- 
downs with long shafts if you have 
shallow drawers directly below your 
benchtop, while models that extend 
far above the bench may get in the 
way when you're planing or caning. 
• If you plan to use the holdnlown in 
several locations, you'll want to con- 
sider how badlv vou'll scar your 
benchtop when you mount it. Some, 

like the Record, 
require you to coun- 
terbore large holes 
and install perma- 
nent sleeves. Now 
let's look at the field: 

KEVIN IRELAND is managing 
editor of AW, 




AMERICAN WOODWOHKfR 



JUNE 1094 



59 



LEVERCLAMP 



HOLD-DOWN 



QUICK-GRIP 
HOLD-DOWN 




Jofgensen Clamp Co. 
(3X2) 666-0640 

Circle *601 

Max. Reach: IV4 In. 

Max. Height: 3 In. 

Mounts In 3 A4n. 
count ertwred hole In bonchtop. 

List Price: $13.85 
Extra Bolts: $1.45 



As you'd expect from a company 
that makes high-quality clamps, this 
cast-iron hold-down (Model 1623) is a 
solid performer. It grips tightly, and 
the base is slotted so you can easily 
slide it off the head of a mounting bolt 
and remove the hold-down from the 
bench when it's not in use. (The bolt 
head then falls into a coumerbored 
hole in the benchtop so it's out of the 
way.) Jorgcnscn also makes an indus- 
trial version of this hold-down (Model 
1834) that sells for $81,11 and has a 
maximum reach of 2% in. and a maxi- 
mum height of 4 l A in. 

Bottom Line 

This hold-down is a good choice for 
small work pieces, although its long 
screw takes longer to adjust to differ- 
ent thicknesses than other clamps I 
tested. It resists shock and lateral and 
rotational pressure, but its reach and 
height limit its use for large or wide 
work. It is also useful for drill-press 
applications. 




MapleTek Engineering 
(800) 425-2677 

Max. Reach: 3V* In. 
Max. Height: 4 In. 

Mounts In 3 /Wn, hole III benchtop, 

or In T-channel screwed Into slot 

routed Into benchtop. May also 

be screwed to surface. 

list Price: $39.95 
Optional lB-ln. T-channel: $10 

A new addition to the market, this 
hold-down is easy to operate, instantly 
adjusts to grip workpieces up to 4 in. 
thick, and clamps with a simple snap 
of the lever handle. 

The Leverclamp is made of heavy 
stamped steel and comes with a 
replaceable wooden jaw that won't 
mar workpieces. You can mount it to 
your bench with a bolt and wing nut, 
or rout a slot in your workbench, 
install the optional T-channel and use 
the hold-down anywhere along the 
length of the channel. A thumbscrew 
on the jaw allows you to repeat 
clamping settings for production 
work. Plus, you can regulate the 
clamping pressure with a single 
adjustment screw. 

Bottom Line 
With its instant adjustability, this 
hold-down is particularly useful if 
you're clamping a series of work- 
pieces that vary in thickness or 
height, It resists shock and lateral 
pressure, but it tends to give under 
heavy rotational pressure. The 
Leverclamp would also work well as a 
quick clamp on the radial arm saw, 
on the drill press t and on jigs, 




American Tool Co. 

(800} 787-6297 

Circle #603 

Max. Roach: 2 3 A in. 
Max, Height: 4 In, 

Mounts In 3 /Wn. hole In bonchtop, 

wttti support bracket screwed 

to underside of bonchtop* 

UBt Price: S30 

Additional Mounting 

B racket & : $8 for 2 

steel and plastic hold-down is 
built around the popular Quick-Grip 
mini-bar clamp and shares both the 
virtues and failings of that clamp. It's 
lightweight and easy to adjust; howev- 
er, it doesn't produce enough clamp- 
ing pressure for heavy work* 

The hold-down fits through a H-in.- 
dia. hole and into a support bracket 
screwed to the underside of your 
work surface. This means you'd need 
to buy additional brackets, or move 
the one that comes with the hold- 
down t to use it in more than one loca- 
tion on your bench, A soft plastic pad 
keeps the metal jaw from marring the 
w T orkpieec, but in my tests the pad 
frequently came loose. 

Bottom Line 

The Quick-Grip hold-down is built for 
light-duty work, particularly where 
you need the flexibility to quickly 
clamp workpieces of varying thick- 
ness. It doesn't withstand shock, nor 
docs it hold well under lateral or rota- 
tional pressure. It lacks the reach 
needed for large or heavy work. 






eo 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



J UNt 1334 



RECORD BENCH 
HOLDFAST 



5JOBERG5 SWIVELING 
HOLD-DOWN 



r CLAMP 




Record Tools 

(305) 420-1077 

Circle *604 

Max, Reach: 5^6 In. 
Max. Height: 6 a A In. 

Mounts In ^4n. hole In benchtop 

with 2feJn. stepped counterboie 

for cast4ron sleeve. 

LI st Price: $44,70 
Additional Collars: $9.95 



Record has updated the traditional 
hold-down design by adding an 
adjustable lever arm and a pivoting 
(aw. The result is a hold-down with 
more clamping finesse than a tradi- 
tional hold-down, but less raw damp- 
ing pressure. 

[f you want to move this hold-down 
(Model Ml 45) around your bench, 
you'll have to drill several 2&-in.-dia. 
stepped holes and install more than 
one cast-iron collar — something 
woodworkers who own fine benches 
may be reluctant to do. 

The hold-down comes with a 
swivcling jaw that has a rough, waffle- 
like pad. The jaw tended to swivel 
and release when I carved an odd 
shaped piece, and the pad grips well 
but mars the workpicec. Record also 
makes a larger version of this ho id- 
down (Model Ml 46), which has a 6^- 
in, reach and a maximum height of 8/^ 
in, It sells for $58.30. 

Bottom Lin* 

The Record hold-down is easy to 
adjust and a good choice for small and 
large workpieces, provided they're 
flat or square. It resists shock ;is well 
as lateral pressure, but it gives way 
under heavy rotational pressure. 
Woodworkers who treasure their 
benches may have a hard time boring 
the large stepped hole required to 
mount this hold-down. 




Distributed by Garrett Wade Co. 
(800) 221-2943 

Circle #605 

Max. Reach: 4 In. 
Max. Height: 6 In. 

Mounts In i^tln. hole 
In benchtop. 

List Price: $59.95 
Additional Sleeve; $2.95 



This cast-Iron and steel hokkiown 
combines the simplicity of a bar 
clamp with the ease of use of a tradi- 
tional hold-down. For rough height 
adjustments, you just move the bar up 
and down in a steel sleeve that's coun- 
ter bored into the bench. Once the 
hold-down is In place, you crank a 
screw to apply pressure. 

The hold-down comes with a 2%- 
in. -wide nylon ball-and-socket jaw that 
will swivel to grip objects of any 
shape— and grip them tightly. The 
only downside is mounting and relo- 
cating the hold-down, You need to 
drill a l!4-in.-dia< hole in your bench- 
top wherever you use it. 

Bottom Lino 
This hold-down was my favorite. It 

adjusts easily and resists shock as well 
as rotational and lateral pressure. The 
wide, swiveling nylon pad makes it 
especially useful for carving. 
However, the large mounting hole 
may discourage some people from 
installing it in a fine workbench. 




Distributed by Grizzly Imports 
(800) 523-4777 

Circto #606 

Max. Reach: 3 In* 
Max. Height: 3 In. 

Mounts In 3 /Wn, hole In benchtop, 

or In T -channel screwed Into slot 

routed Into benchtop. 

List Price: $12,95 

Optional 244n. Aluminum 

T-c hannel: $19.95 

The greatest attribute of this 
anodized aluminum hold-down is 
size. It mounts in a %-in. hole, and the 
body and bolt only protrude 4 in. 
above the tabic. 

You can mount the T Clamp in a 
dog hole, so it's easy to relocate if your 
bench is set up that way; Or, as with 
the Lcvcrclamp, you can rout a slot in 
your benchtop, install an optional T 
channel and use the T Clamp any- 
where alon^ the length of the channel. 
You spin a wing nut to adjust it verti- 
cally, which makes it slower than 
some of the other hold-downs. 

Bottom Line 
This inexpensive hold-down would 
work well for small and thin work, 
but it doesn't have the capacity to 
handle thick workpieces, It resists 
shock t but die jaw's small bearing sur- 
face allows workpieces to sliift under 
heavy lateral and rotational pressure. 
The T-Clamp would also work well on 
the radial arm saw and on jigs. 






AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



«1 



TRADITIONAL 
HOLD-DOWN 



VERITAS DELUXE BENCH 
HOLD-DOWN 



VISE-GRIP 
HOLD-DOWN 




Distributed by Garrett Wode Co. 
(800) 221-2942 

Circte #607 

Max. Roach: &*A In. 
Max. Height: 12 In. 

Mounts Jn l^o-fai. hole 
In benchtop. 

LJat Price: $35.95 




Vorrtaa Tools Inc. 
(800) 607-2986 

Circle #608 

Max. Reach: 7^4 In. 

Max. Height: 9 In. 

Mounts In %ln. note 
fn bonchtop. 

Ust Price: $49.95 




American Tool Co. 
(BOO) 767-0297 

Circle #603 

Max. Reach: 2*M In. 
Max. Height: 4 In. 

Mount* In %-Jn. hole 
In bene ht op. 

Ust Price: $27 



Tills forged steel hold-down's design 
was old when George Washington 
was woodworking on a cherry tree, 
but it still proves remarkably useful. 
With the tap of a mallet you can quick- 
ly adjust it to handle thick or thin 
workpieces. And varying clamping 
pressure is simply a matter of varying 
how hard you rap it with your mallet. 

On the downside, the long bar 
means you can only use it on a bench 
with a good deal of clearance under 
the work surface, Also, setting and 
removing die hold-down can damage 
the holes in the bench t op, particularly 
if your bench top is less than a couple 
of inches thick. 

Bottom Lino 

This hold-down shows it's not always 
easy to improve on the old ways. It 
can handle workpieces of widely vary- 
ing thickness. It also resists shock and 
rotational and lateral pressure. 



Whetl Veritas Tools designs a prod- 
uct it likes to improve on what's 
already on the market, and its huld 
down is no exception. This steel and 
aluminum alloy hold-down works 
much like the Record version does — it 
has a traditional hold-down body with 
an adjustable lever arm. But unlike the 
Record, you can mount the Veritas in 
a simple Vvin.-dia. dog hole, so it's 
easy to move around the bench. 

This hold-down is easy to adjust, 
but I found it difficult to apply heavy 
clamping pressure because the sharp- 
edged brass knob was hard to grip. 

Bottom Line 

The Veritas hold-down Is a good 
choice for flat or square workpieces of 
any size. It resists shock as well as lat- 
cral pressure, but it gives way under 
heavy rotational pressure. It requires 
less clearance below the benchtop 
than the other hold-downs that are 
based on the traditional design. 



Anyone familiar with a pair of Vise- 
Grip pliers will understand how this 
hold-down works. Made by the same 
company that makes the pliers, this 
stamped steel hold-down is held to 
the bench with a wing nut, so it's easy 
to relocate if you have dog holes on 
your bench. And the jaw is covered 
with a nylon pad, so it won't mar the 
workpicce. On the downside, this 
hold-down is slower to adjust than 
some of the other models, and it only 
has a 2-ln*-iong mounting shaft, which 
means you can't fasten it to a thick 
benchtop. 

Bottom Lino 
The Vise-Grip hold-down is good for 
small workpieces. It resists shock and 
lateral pressure but tends to give w T ay 
under heavy rotational pressure, It 
would work well as a clamp on the 
radial arm saw, on a drill-press table 
and on jigs, A 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 



SEATING 




SIMPLE 



A Comfortable Combination of Wood and Canvas 



fay Simon Watti 

Carolyn and John Grew-Slieridan are 
furniture makers who live and 
work in San Francisco's Mission 
district. They've made a large number 
of chairs over the years, bin this 
design remains one of (heir favorites. 
"We like it/ says Carolyn, "because 
it's straightforward and can be made 
with simple tcmb and materials, *" 

It's one of my favorite chairs, too, I 
find the canvas scat and back very 
comfortable, and it gives my lower 



back plenty of support. And since the 
canvas 'gives" when you lean against 
it, you're less likely to tip the chair 
back on two legs, which might strain 
the joints. 

The rectilinear design (every piece 
except the back supports meets at a 
right angle) has two advantages: It 
greatly simplifies the joinery, and 
allows you to easily change the 
dimensions. "You shouldn't have any 
qualms about modifying this chair to 
fit your own special needs/ says 
Carolyn. Tor example, you can make 
it wider or raise the 
height of the arm rests,* 
What you should not do, 
the Grcw-Shcridans 
emphasize* is reduce the 
cross-sections of the 
components* 
which 



»l 




^ 



This chair's rectilinear design keeps the joinery 
simple and lets you change the dimensions 
to suit your needs- 



might weaken the structure. 

Whether or not you modify the 
dimensions, the Grew-Sheridans rec- 
ommend that you make an extra 
piece for each element— for example, 
three side rails instead of two. Then 
you can make all the trial cuts on the 
spares and keep them as patterns in 
case you want to build more chairs. 

Making the Chair 
Since the joinery is basic, I won't 
describe every step. Instead, I'll offer 
some tips the Grew-Sheridans suggest 
for the trick)' pans of construction. 

The chair in the photo is made of 
red birch, but you could use walnut, 
cherry or any strong, stable wood. 
The seat and back are made from two 
layers of 10-oz. cotton canvas (avail- 
able from local tent or awning supply 
stores) stitched together around the 
perimeter. (See Fig. 2.) To stiffen the 
scat, a piece of '/i-in. high-density 
foam is stitched between the layers. 
Both seat and back are locked in place 
with wooden dowels as shown In the 
detail photos and Fig, ! . 

Start by making up the two side 
frames as sub-assemblies. Each of 
these consists of a front and back leg, 
an arm rest and a side rail (Sec Fig. 
!.) To cut the bridle joints, you can 
use a handsaw or work on the table- 
saw with a sharp carbide blade. For 
safety, be sure to use some kind of 
tenoning jig on the tablesaw. Cut the 
mortises first, then make trial cuts on 
-scrap until you can create a tenon 
that fits snugly. 

You'll need a plunge router and 
uAv\ r straight bit to rout the through 
slots in the side rails. One way to 
guide the slanted cut is to make a £ 
tapered wedge and temporarily hot- 5 
glue it to the edge of the rail. Then 
use die wedge to guide your plunge 
router's fence., After routing, smooth * 



AMERICAN. WOOD WO 



QflfW 



Eft 



JUNE 19 94 



ea 



■ 



FIG. 1: CONSTRUCTING THE FRAME 



Root riot and onlafge 
canter with rotary rasp 
to receive dowel and 

canvas. 



BILL OF MATERIALS 

QTY. DIMENSIONS 



SUaRuh 

Front and Back Raits 

Aim Rests 

Back Supports 
DoinJs (back rest) 

Dowttefstat] 

* Length Eludes tenons 



i 

£ 




iV* 1 3V4 v ir 

1 Vs x ZU x 21* 
iVl 1 %% x uft * 

Va da. 1 16 



Rout Vifrin. slot 
through side rail. 



BACK SUPPORT 



Cut Inside notch alter assenwfy 
for back support 



k Leave stock square where rails join tegs, 
and where back supports join tails. All other 
edges are routed with a Win. round-over bit 




BACK SUPPORT AND 
SEAT SLOT DETAIL 

ARMREST 



Place back support on side 
frame assembly as shown 
to mark notch locations* 




¥4 



REAR LEG 



FIG. 2: CANVAS SEAT & BACK 



Sew In Wn.-lhfck 
high-density foam. 




DOWEL 



BRAIDED HXIOH LACING 




Vfc-IN-GRGMMET 



Form back and seat 
from two layer* of 
10-oz. cotton canvas. 



BOTTOM VIEW OF INSTALLED SCAT 



Leave open at bottom 
comers for dowel. 




(Finished 

dimensions 

$hown) 



the edges of the grooves so they 
won't cut into the canvas. 

Next, cut mortises in the legs for the 
side, front and back rails, (For tips on 
mortising by machine, see aw ^26.) 

Now dry clamp the side frames and 
ease the edges with a *irin. round-over 
bit r leaving the stock square where ihe 
front and back rails will join the legs, 
and where the back supports meet che 
arm rests and side rails. The outer 
edges of the side rails arenl flush with 
the legs, so you 11 have to remove the 
rails to finish rounding diem. If you'd 
rather work by hand, you can round 
all the edges with a block plane and 
sandpaper affixed to a cork block. 

After gluing up each side frame 
you can make the two back supports. 
You will have to cut a key hole^h aped 
stopped groove (see above right photo 
and Fig. I) in each back support to 
accept the dowcJ that holds the can* 
vas back in place. The CJrcw-Shcridans 
do this in two steps: They first rout 
slots with a %An, straight bit; then 
the)' use a "i^in.-dia. ball-shaped rotary 



rasp (available from S&W Tool, 1014 
Liberty St., Allcntown, PA 18102, 215- 
■134*5457} in the router to enlarge the 
slots to the correct profile. Use a dou- 
ble fence and a stop so that you can 
withdraw the hit safely. 

You could also make each back su]> 
port in two halves, rout a semicircular 
channel in the pieces with a l j *in.-dia. 
core-box bit. then glue the two halves 
together, If you choose to do this, be 
sure to clean any glue squeeze-out 
from the inside of the groove. 

Next, you'll need to notch the arm 
rests to receive the back supports and 
notch the lower end of the hack sup- 
ports to fit around the side rails. (Sec 
Fig, I <) The easiest way to do this is 
to hold the back support in the posi- 
tion Indicated in the detail in Fig. I, 
then scribe marks to indicate the 
notch locations. You can cut the 
notches by making multiple saw kerfs 
and removing the waste with a chisel. 
or you can set up a template and 
waste the notches with a straight bit 
in a router. Glue and screw the side 




The ends of the seat fit through slots in 
the side rails, A dowel slips into a pock- 
et at each end to hold the seat En place* 




Dowels slip into pockets sewn in the 
ends of the seat back, then the can vas 
and dowel slide into a slot in each back 
support. 

supports in place, then plug the 
scrcw T holes with Vin. plugs. 

To finish up, glue the front and back 
rails into the side frame assemblies. 

The chair shown here is finished 
with a mixture of linseed oil and var- 
nish thinned with turpentine. Tung 
oil varnish or Watco oil finish would 
do equally well. 

Fig 1 shows how the canvas for the 
seat and back are cut and sewn togeth- 
er, but unless you have an industrial 
sewing machine and know how to 
sew. it's best to find a sail maker or 
tent and awning business to do this 
work and install the grommets. Id sug- 
gest you provide 
them with full-size 
patterns of the chair 
back and seat, along 
with a completed 
chair frame. A 

SIMON WATTS tsAWs West 
Coast editor. He teaches uwsdeti 

boatbuilding at the San Francisco 
Mar Him e Maseu m. 



fF 




AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 








Easy to Work With Simple Tools, 
This Soft Stone Holds a Surprise at Every Turn 










hen people first sec small ves- 
sels like these that Ivc turned 
from dendritic talc, they assume the 
beautiful fernlike patterns must he 
painted on, Not so: The patterns are 
actually pan of the soft stone Itself— 
flower jewels created by nature at 
her finest. 

Dendritic talc is much like the 
common white talc from which we 



By William E. Sargent 

through as grayish "clouds," adding a 
mysterious effect to a finished piece. 

Properties of Talc 

Talc has a hardness of 1 on M oils' 
scale (diamond is 10), so it saws and 
turns quickly. It is friable, meaning it's 
likely to crumble* but if you employ a 




Figured talc vessels like these can be turned on the lathe with scrapers. 

Because large blocks of this soft stone are rare and extremely dense, tfs most often 

used tor small turnings. These vessels are shown at three-quarters actual size. 



get talcum powder. In fact, it is 
mined from pockets within larger 
deposits of regular white tale. Hut 
this figured talc has an added ele- 
ment, manganese dioxide, which 
forms the fernlike patterns that are 
called dendrites. (See photo, above,) 
The patterns run throughout the talc, 
so new dendrites appear with each 
sliee of your turning tool. Also, den- 
dritic talc is translucent enough that 
the patterns below the surface show 



gentle touch when turning it, you can 
master the substance. My success rate 
initially was 45 percent, but now my 
yield is better than 98 percent, 

I do most of my turning with small 
detail scrapers (set available from 
Woodcraft, Box 1686 T Parkersbur^ 
WV 26102, 8Q0-22S-1153), but I some- 
times use a I '/.j-in. round-nose scraper 
for the initial shaping of a large Nock. 

Dendritic talc comes in irregular 
shapes and sizes (available from Craft 



66 AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 



&K 



Supplies USA, 1287 E. 1120 S. p Provo p 
UT 84606, 801-373*0917, and Blue 
Gem Agate Shop t 7315 10th Ave, SW t 
Alexandria, MN 56308, 612-762- 
1973). It is sold by the pound, and 
since it is mined by blasting, pieces 
weighing over 10 pounds arc rarely 
available. Pieces large enough to turn 
bowls 10 to 12 in. in dia, arc extreme- 
ly rare. Besides, the material is so 
dense (with a specific gravity of 2.6 
to 2.9) that a cubic ft. weighs 
between 162 and 180 pounds — a 
mite heavy for an averagc*stac lathe. I 
prefer to start with rough pieces 
between 4 and 10 pounds — enough 
to produce small turnings, A 4-pound 
block may yield a bowl about 4 in, in 
dia. by 2 in, deep. 

Talc is subject to fractures, both 
natural and resulting from the mining 
process. You can try sealing clean 
cracks with cyanoacrylate glue (avail- 
able from Craft Supplies USA, 801- 
373-0917), but I don" i recommend it. 
If there Is any talc dust in the crack 
you won't get a good bond, and even 
if the glue holds, it will show as a 
brown line when the turning is fin- 
ished. Since fractures are usually visi- 
ble on the surface. 1 eliminate these 
areas when 1 lay out and saw my 
blanks from the rough stone. 

Black line fractures, like the one 
shown at the top of the opposite 
page, pose the greatest problem. 
These occur when the manganese 
dioxide forms in a Laver* The talc is 

■ 

sure to come apart at this line, so 
you're best off breaking apart the 
block before that happens and making 
smaller bowls. 

1 recommend wearing a dust mask 
during turning, because the talcum 
powder which comes off the to ruing 
has a drying effect on the nose tis- 
sues and skin. Also be aware that talc 
has an annoying trait of producing a 
high static electrical charge when 
passing through a shop vacuum or 
du^t collector. 



- : 



r 
1 



c 



*d» 



* 





1 






-A 






Working With Talc 

I prepare the material for turning by 
sawing out the bJank on a handsaw 
equipped with a skip-tooth blade. 

ale dust will find its way into every 
nook and cranny In your shop, so it's 
best to saw outside.) Then I square 
hoth ends of a blank with the saw, 
and sand one end flat with a belt 
sander and SOgrit emery paper, again 
outside the shop 

To mount the blank on the lathe, I 
glue the talc to an auxiliary wooden 
faceplate with Devcon 5-Mmute 
Epoxy* Talc has a slippery fed, and no 
adhesive will bond to it if any dust 
remains on the surface. So, before 
applying epoxy I wipe the surface of 
the talc with a slightly dampened 
paper towel. (Don't try to substitute 
another adhesive for the epoxy, Tve 
found that two-sided tape won't bond 
to tale, and cy anoacryiate glue doesn't 
have sufficient holding power.) 

After the epoxy hardens I mount 
the faceplate to my special 
chuck/faceplate combination, (See 
middle photo at right,) This consists 
of a 2-in.-long piece of steel with male 
threads on one end that mate with the 
female threads in my faceplate. 1 
mount the other end of the round 
stt>ek in a four-jaw chuck. This allows 
me to move the faceplate in any direc- 
tion so I can precisely center a blank 
after it's mounted, reducing waste. 

Turning Talc 

1 turn the outside of the bow! first 
and support ihc talc block with the 
tailstock while roughing out. 
{Caution: If you use a center that has 
a sharp point, insert a small piece of 
wood between Its point and your 
blank. Otherwise, the pressure 
focused at the point will consistently 
break the blank.) 

I turn at the slowest possible 
speed — 450 rpm on my lathe— 
because this gives me greater control 
when using my scrapers, It's also much 



safer to turn at this speed, since high 
speed can cause a blank to come apart 
To turn the inside, I part off the 
bowl, cut an !frin. recess in the wood- 
en faceplate and glue the bowl in the 
recess. (See bottom photo.) I use hot- 
melt glue here because it doesn't 
make a permanent bond to the talc 
and won't damage the finished sur- 
face. To get a good bond, I apply sev- 
eral layers of glue to build up a fillet. 
Note that it's important to keep the 
glue out of the recess; otherwise it will 
be impossible to remove the bowl. 

After remounting the bowl blank, I 
hollow die interior. Don't be tempted 
to drill the interior, its likely to crack. 
Also, don't lever against the bowl 
when removing it from the faceplate, 
as this, too, is likely to crack it. 
Instead, catch the edge of the glue 
bead with a knife blade and pull it 
away from the perimeter of the bowl. 
1 sand and polish the surfaces as I 
turn. 1 go over the exterior lightly 
with a well-worn piece of 220-grit 
stearated sandpaper— new paper will 
cut too deeply in the soft stone. Then 
I wet-sand the surface with 600-grit 
wct-or-dry paper and water to pro- 
duce a satin finish. For a high shine I 
use Novus II liquid polish (available 
from Craft Supplies, 801-373-0917), 
No additional surface treatment is nec- 
essary, although I may apply a coating 
of carnauba wax tor a higher luster 

Once you've tried turning dendritic 
talc, I think you'll sec why I'm so 
enthralled with it. It's versatile, easy 
to work and absolutely beautiful, Best 

of all, it challenges 
you as a turner to 
make artwork 
■ that's so beautiful, 

W no one can resist 

admiring it. A 

WILLIAM E. SARGENT is a 

retired research and development 
engineer who turns' talc and wood 
in Arizona. 





When a turning blank has a Mack line 
fracture like this one. It Is sure to break. 
Author splits blanks like these into 
smaller chunks to turn miniature pats. 




IF 
ft 



Author screws faceplate to a 2-bi. piece 
of steel end then mounts this in a 
four-jaw chuck whose jaws move Inde- 
pendently. This allows him to precisely 
center a blank after ft Is mounted. 




After the outside ts turned r the bowl 
is reversed and then glued to m recess 
cut in a wooden faceplate* 
To set a good bond, author builds 
up layers of hot-melt glue* 






AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



67 




I 



Until recently, 1 only considered 
three factors when buying wood; 
How does it work? How does it 
look and how much does it cost? 
Lately, I've added two more factors to 
the equation: Where docs the wood 
come from, and how well managed is 
the forest in which it is grown? 

Ecological aspects of wood use arc 
much more difficult to assess than 
functional or aesthetic qualities. They 
plunge us into the unfamiliar waters of 
forest management and environmental 
politics. For those of us who turned to 
woodworking as an escape from such 
frustrations, their intrusion on our pre- 
cious refuge is unwelcome indeed. 

Still, the threats to forests all over 
the world are real. In Siberia, the 
Amazon, Indonesia and our own 

Pacific Northwest, old-growth forests 
are rapidly being destroyed. 
Commercial supplies of prized species 
such as Brazilian rosewood 
iDttlhergitt nigra} and Cuban 



mahogany {Swie tenia mabagonO 
have simply been exhausted. 

What does this mean to woodwork- 
ers? Higher prices, declining quality 
and shortages of species such as rose- 
wood and ebony. But it's not just 
exotic imports that are affected. 
Recent increases in the price of 
domestic wood products — from fram- 
ing studs to cherry lumber— are 
directly related to forest management 
problems at home and abroad. 

Less tangible, "quality-of-lifc* 
issues associated with forest destruc- 
tion, including global warming. 
species extinction and the loss of 
wilderness or animal habitat arc of 
concern as well, but their relation- 
ship to woodworkers is less immedi- 
ate and less clear. 

My interest in sustainable forestry 
was kindled in 1989, when 1 joined 
John Curtis of The Luthier's 
Mercantile — a California firm that sells 
instrument-making supplies — on a 



scouting trip to Peru. Curtis was 
about to oversee the company's first 
importation of tropical hardwoods 
from the Yanesha Cooperative, a 
group of native Peruvians which was 
pioneering methods of natural forest 
management- (See sidebar, page 70 .) 
Exotic-sounding species like aimen* 
dro, chontiuittim amartllo and iuru- 
pay were intriguing, but so was 
Curt is' s suggestion that buying these 
unfamiliar woods might actually help 
save the rain forest. 

If that sounds illogical, consider 
this: Roughly half of the world's wood 
is burned for fuel. In the tropics , the 
vast majority of forested land is con- 
vened to cattle pasture or farmland 
that is capable of supporting marginal 
agriculture for only a few years. 
Valuable furniture- wood species such 
as rosewood and mahogany act as cat- 
alysts in a chain reaction, The roads 
that are built for their extraction pro- 
vide access to scL tiers who have no 



g a 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



MINI- 109 4 



! 



reason to preserve ihe forest 
once the relatively few mar- 
ketable trees have been 
removed. 

Curtis was betting that if 
markets could be developed 
for a wider ran^c of tree 
specie^ rain-forest dwellers 
and tropical governments 
would have an economic 
incentive 10 manage forests 
for the kmji haul instead of 
cutting them down for quick, 
short-term profit. 

In other words, even though 
North American woodworkers— anil 
small shops, in particular — consume 
very* lit Lie of the world's tropical lim- 
ber, woodworkers might be able to 
play a central rcile in the rain forest's 
preservation by creating a market for 
more types of trees. 

When I returned from Peru I reaJ- 
ized how confused North American 
woodworkers ;uid wood retailers were 
about the state of the forests and the 
best course of action to take. 
Polarizing tactics, such as tropical- 
wood boycotts and tree spiking in the 
Pacific North west „ were promoted by 
the more radical environmental organi- 
zations. Many in the timber industry 
were clinging to business as usual. 
Some woodworkers had stopped using 
tropical wood, while others were 
hoarding it. Most recognized a prob- 
lem, but few understood the complex 
relationship between wood use, eco- 
nomics, and forest destruction. Fewer 
still had a constructive plan of action. 



Rain-forest destruction. Once mar- 
ketable trees have been harvester], the 
remaining growth is felled and burned to 
clear land for farming or cattle grazing. 
Once cleared, rain-forest soil can sup- 
port agriculture for only a few years 
before the soil is exhausted and another 
patch of forest must be cleared. 




Certification: 
Know Your Source 
On i of this confusion 
emerged a iiuiiiIkt of organi- 
zations supporting response 
hie forest management. 
Several sponsor wood-cert ifi- 
cation programs that make it possible 
for woodworkers to identify 1 and pur- 
chase wood from "well-managed'* 
forestry operations. 

The Rainforest Alliance launched its 
"Smart "Wood" program in 1990 by 
certifying two sources of tropical 
woods in Java and Honduras, Today, 
the Smart Wood program certifies five 
different "good wood" sources in Ave 
tropical countries, and 20 or more 
retail companies that carry wood 
products from these sources. 

Scientific Certification Systems 
(SCS) of Oakland* California, was the 
first to certify North American pro- 
duction forests in Wisconsin and 
northeastern California. 

The SCS "life-cycle" analysis traces 
wood products through their entire 



chain of harvest, manufacture, distri- 
bution and disposal. SCS evaluates for- 
est producers according to their per 
formancc in three categories: susta in- 
ability of timber resources, mainte- 
nance of the forest ecosystem, and 
socioeconomic benefits to the sur- 
rounding community, The best com- 
mercial forests- — such as the Collins- 
Almanor Forest in California — are des- 
ignated "state-of-the-art." 

Beginning in the fall of 1993, the 
Home Depot home-center chain start- 
ed marketing SC^S-ce reified Collins- 
Pine wood in its Phoenix, Arizona, 
stores. Other wood dealers such as 
Sea Star Trading of Newport, Oregon, 
and 1-coTimher International of San 
Francisco, are importing wood and 
veneer from well-managed sources in 



ag 



Conserving Wood: What You Can Do Right Now 

♦ Choose youf wood carefully. Ask your supplier for "certified* wood products from tropical and domestic sources that 
practice sustainable forest management. Responsible resource management Isn't Just a tropical problem. Experiment 
with lesser-known tropical woods and lesser-used domestic species. Look for alternatives to seriously depleted species. 

♦ Use recycled or salvaged woods, You can find good wood In packing crates and pallets as well as in old buildings 
slated for demolition. Also consider the exciting prospects in your own backyard. Large quantities of "junk" wood are 
trimmed from parks and city streets alt over the country. A small bandsaw or chain-saw mill can convert a gnarly old 
front-yard maple into perfectly good lumber; knotty crotch wood can make wild-looking bowls, 

♦ Get the most from the woods you use. Veneers, resawn solid woods and engineered wood products such as plywood 
and particieboard can greatly extend the application of precious species. Save wood in the kerf by using thinner saw 
blades. Use a bandsaw for re sawing instead of a tables aw (it's also less dangerous) and minimize planing waste by 
sawing your stock as close to finished dimensions as possible (which also saves wear and tear on your equipment). 

♦ Think beyond your workshop. Eighty percent of at I domestic softwood lumber is used in construction, and the 
average American house has increased In size by nearly 30 percent in the last 20 years. Consider smaller, more effi- 
cient approaches to house construction and renovation, using recycled or reconstituted materials wherever possible. 

♦ You get what you pay for. Responsible forest management, like quality furniture, costs more. Expect to pay more 
for wood from "well managed" forests, You can't expect producers to shoulder the burden alone. 

♦ Quality Jasts. Finely crafted wood products add the greatest value to a precious resource. — S*L. 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



6 9 






Natural regeneration r» one form of u» tamable forestry* The photo at left *how» where a rain-fore*! tree w» harvested. The 
forest around the tree remains intact to naturally reseed the area damaged by the falling tree (center). The photo at right shows 
the site where a tree was harvested two years ago. You can see the amount of regrowth that has occurred naturally. 



3 



s 



t 



Mexico, Belize, Papua New Guinea 
and the Solomon Islands. These 
woods arc distributed through a 
small but growing network of retail 
suppliers across the country. (See 

sidebar, page 71.) 

Many of these certifiers, wood 



dealers and manufacturers were repre- 
sented at the founding conference of 

the Woodworkers Alliance for 
Rainforest Protection (WARP) t which 
was held in 1990.. Since its founding, 
WARP has played a prominent role in 
educating wood users about forest 



Trail Blazers 

Two hardwood producers have gained a reputation for responsible forest 
management. A continent apart, with radically different terrain and tree 
species, the Menominee Reservation in central Wisconsin and the Yanesha 
Cooperative in the Amazon rain forest of Peru provide two different models 
of "sustainable* forestry, 

Tne Menominee forest produces roughly 30 million bd. ft. of hardwood 
and softwood timber per year — more than 2 biltton bd. ft. since cutting 
began in 1865, What's more, this carefully managed operation produces a 
higher volume and better quality of timber now than when the land was first 
surveyed in the last century. 

Menominee is no wilderness. Roads everywhere lead to skidder tracks 
and stumps. Tree harvesting is managed intensively through regular invento- 
ries and data collected on hundreds of test plots. Only about 25 percent of 
the reservation is managed in small clearcuts or in plantations. The rest is 
"natural" forest, allowed to regenerate on its own. The secret, as 
Menominee forester Steve Arnold told me, is simple: * Instead of cutting the 
best, we cut the worst." 

The Menominee forest was the first in North America to be certified as 
"well managed"" by Scientific Certification Systems, a not-for-profit environ- 
mental assessment company based in Oakland, California. 

The Yanesha Cooperative in Peru follows a "strip-shelterbelt" system of 
harvesting in which narrow strips, roughly 50 meters wide, are ctearcut in 
the forest. The strips simulate what occurs naturally when a giant tree top- 
ples in the rain forest, clearing a path as it falls. The area adjacent to the 
clearcuts is left untouched to maintain the forest habitat and promote natu- 
ral regeneration within each strip. 

Tne Yanesha make use of all wood harvested. Limbs and tops are con- 
verted to charcoal, small trees are sold for utility poles and construction 
posts, and the best sawlogs are milled for lumber. Although it is still experi- 
mental in nature — and much smaller in scale than the Menominee opera- 
tion — the Yanesha cooperative has exported several containers of lesser- 
known tropical hardwoods to the U.S. and England. — S.L. 






management issues, 

WARP's membership includes 
woodworkers, wood and tool dealers, 
architects, biologists, environmental- 
ists and consumers. Knitting together 
these diverse interests, WARP pro- 
motes sustainable forestry using the 
"carrots 7 ' of positive market incentives 
instead of the punitive * sticks" of boy- 
cotts or tariffs, 

But you cant promote "sustainable 
forestry" 1 until you can define it. 
There's a lot more to sustainability 
than simply growing more trees than 
you cut. It involves a complex balance 
of environmental, social and econom- 
ic considerations. 

The Forest Stewardship Council 
(FSC) recently established nine princi- 
ples tlmt lay the groundwork for defin- 
ing sustainable forest management. 
Addressing a range of issues— from 
legal land tenure to forest management 
plans— these FSC principles are 
designed to help certifiers evaluate 
lumber producers' management prac- 
tices and their impact on the local envi- 
ronment and community. The FSC 
aims to set a universal standard for con- 
sistent, sustainable forest management. 

Supply and Demand: Lies, 
Damned Lies and Statistics 

As promising as these ventures arc, 
certification alone won't put an end to 
the world forest crisis. The issue is not 
only where we buy the wood, but 
how much we use and how well we 
replace it, If wc don't reduce the over- 
all volume of the wood we consume— 
at home and abroad— no amount of 
certification or well-intentioned "green 



70 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1994 



marketing* will prevent the world's 
forests from being depleted, 

According to the United N ill ion * 
Food and Agriculture Organization, 

the world is losing its tropical forests 
at the rate of almost 42 million acres 
per year — up 50 percent from a 
decade ago. The greatest deforesta- 
tion occurs in Latin America (20.5 mil- 
lion acres per year) with Africa (12,4 
million acres per year) and Asia <H.9 
million acres per year) close behind. 

The outlook seems brighter in 
North America. According to die U.S. 
Industrial Outlook 1993. domestic 
timber inventories in the United States 
are growing at a faster rate than 
they're being cut. 

But as good as that sounds for the 
count ry as a whole, on closer inspec- 
tion the picture is not so rosy. This is 
especially true in parts of the country 
that rely heavily on softwood produc- 
tion, such as the Pacific Northwest, 
where more than 100 milks have 
closed since 1991. 

Statistics can also be misleading. 
When a timber company boasts of 
planting iwo or three trees for every 
one they cut. you don't need a calcu- 
lator to figure out that it will take an 
army of seedlings (and many decades) 
to replace the volume of wood — not 
to mention the quality of lumber — 
contained in one old giant. 

According to the Center for 
Resourceful Building Technology in 
Billings, Montana, the extensive tim- 
ber inventories often cited by industry 
representatives won't reach maturity 
for another 10 to 20 years in the 
South and 30 to SO years in the West. 
What's more, industrial forestry prac- 
tices too often replace diverse and 
dynamic forest systems with single- 
species tree plantations. 

Plantations have their purpose — 
especially where they replace land 
that has been severely degraded — but 
the) are much more vulnerable to dis- 
ease than natural forests, and they 
severely limit the range of available 
biological resources. A cure for can- 
cer or AIDS is more likely to be dis- 
covered among the vast diversity of 
plants and insects in the tropical rain 
forest than on the lushest tree farm. 

Domestic hardwood inventories arc 
much stronger than softwood, mainly 
because we've been exporting more 



softwood than hardwood and supple- 
menting our own hardwood require- 
ments with tropical timber. But we've 
depleted many stands of the best 
hardwcK>d specimens. Ijcss than S per- 
cent of the original old-growth forest 
remains in the lower 48 states. 

On the consumption side, a lot of 
wood is just wasted. The pallet ind us- 
ury t for example, accounts for roughly 
half of all hardwood timber cut down 
in the U.S. each year. Fully half of 
these pallets, skids and packing crates 
are used once and discarded, account- 
ing for an estimated 40 percent of the 
country's total wood waste, 

Hope for the Future 

A lot has happened in the few short 
years since WARP s founding confer- 
ence in 1990- The task that remains 
is daunting, But of all the causes for 
hope, the greatest may be found in 
the new collaborations between 
wood users and conservationists. Old 
harriers between industry, environ- 
mentalists and producers are break- 
ing down, The very notion of "sus- 
tainable" forest management has 
begun to take root in popular cul- 
ture. If we woodworkers hope to 

preserve our 

craft— as well as 
our forests— for 
our children, we 
must nurture these 
roots. A 

SCOTT LANDIS is a writer and 
photographer ftt Maine, lie is the 
director of the Woodworkers 
Alliance for Rainforest PratecUmi. 

For More Information 

For more information about 

wood certification and 

sustainable sources, contact: 

Forest Stewardship Council 

P.O. Bo* 849, Richmond. VT 05477 

1002)434-3101 

Rain For** t Alliance 

65 Bteecfcai St. New YorX NY 100122420 

(212)1 677-1900 

Scientific Certification Systems 

On© Kaiser Plgja. Suite 901 

Oakland, CA 94612 

(S10I 832- 14 15 

Woodworkers Alliance 

for Rainforest Protection WARP 

One Cottage St.. Easihamptorv MA 01027 

(413> 586-81 56 




Tropical 

"Good Wood" 

Suppliers 

The following dealers sell tropical wood 

from certified "well-man aged" sources. 

Many also carry wood from uncertified 

sources; be sure to ask. 



AIM Wood Specialty 

Cambridge. Ontario. Canada 

Aknqutit Lumber 
Blue Lake, CA 

Appalachian Interiors 
MaryvillQ f TN 

Berea Hardwoods 
Brook Path, OH 

Buchner Design Studies 
Sari Francisco. CA 

Crosscut Hardwoods 
Portland, OR 

Cut ft Dried Hardwood* 
I Solans Beach. CA 

Etc Timber International 

San Francisco, CA 

Edensaw Wood* 
Port Tcwisend, WA 

EnvfRetourc* 

Bainbridfie Island, WA 

rlartdtoggsrs Hard wo od 

Larkspur, CA 

Larson Wood Products 
Eugene, OR 

Northern Hardwood Lumber 

Santa Clare. CA 

Piltirufu Lumber 
Pittsfoid. MY 

Rio Rlvuma 

Boston, MA 

Sei Star Trading 

Newport, OR 

Trot Product* Hardwood* 
Eugene, OR 

WW Woods Co, 
Areata. CA 

Wlbon Woodwork! 
Starloffl, CT 

Wise Wood 

McHenry. IL 



{519) 653-9322 

Circle #610 

{707} 668-5652 
Circle #611 

(615) 984-4989 

Circle #612 

(2161 234-7949 

Circle #613 

(415) 822*7300 
Circle #614 

(503) 224*9663 

Circle #615 

1619) 481-0442 
Circle #616 

1415) 864-4900 
Cirtl* #617 

(800) 745-3336 

CincCe #618 

1206) 842-9785 
Circle #619 

(415)481*1180 

Drdea620 

I503J 343-5229 
Circle PS21 

1408) 727*2211 

Circle #622 

(716) 586-1877 

Circle #623 

(617)451-2549 

Circle #624 

(503) 265-9616 
Circle #625 

(503) 689-8515 
Circle #626 

1707) 822-9541 

CJrcte #627 

(203)664-0112 
Circle #628 

(815) 344-4943 

C :rc!e #629 



WoodcanUa Forest Product! (503) 926-5488 



Corvaiiis. OR 

Wooden Workbench 
Fort Collins. CO 

Woodworker* Source 

PhaenUt, AZ 



Circle #630 

P03) 484*2423 

Circle #631 

(800) 423-2480 
Circle #632 



This list was compiled by tne Woodworkers 
Alliance for Rainforest Protection (WARP). 
wriich does not guarantee any sources or 
endorse any specific suppliers. 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



T1 



WOODWORKERS! ENTER THE 



craftsmanship 

American ______ 

woodworker competition 



AND YOU COULD WIN nOOO. 00 IN CASH. 




It's time to enter jour best work in the ] 994 AMERICAN WOODWORKER Excellence 
in Craftsmanship Awards Competition. 

Send us photos of a project you've built, and you could win one of nine awards - including a 
cash prize of up to $1 000. All types of woodworking projects arc eligible: rurniiure, turnings, 
carving, sculpture, musical instruments, toys, etc. You may enter up to three pieces. Entries 
will he judged for craftsmanship and design, but designs need not be original to win. 

Amateurs, professionals, and students* will be judged separately, 

*Fff qualify at a ttadttft rntr MMS Ac tnt&fM ins itv&thrvr'ktNg .<fioof &r fumifa ft tfrsigm uhwrf in 1994. 



TO ENTER: 

Fill ant the form on this page (or 
a photocopy) and mill it with: 

] I A color photograph (s) or 
dide(s) of the piecc(s) you want 

io enter (up to three pieces). 
Label photos and slides with your 
name and address. 

2\ A description of each piece 
including dimensions and materi- 
als (100 words nr less). 

3 1 Include a self- ad dressed, 
stamped envelope for return of 
slides. (Sorry, prints cannot be 
returned J 

Deadline for entries: 
September Ui, 1994. 
Finalist* will be contacted mr fur- 
ther information and winners will 
be announced in rhe February 

1995 issue of American 
Woodworker, 



Conditions: 

The deadline for entries is 

September lit, 1994, American 
WOODWORKER is nor responsible 
for entries Lost, delayed or dam- 
aged in the mail or elsewhere. 
Incomplete entries will be dis- 
qualified. Decision of the judge* 
shall be final. 



PRIZES: 

Amateur Category 
I ft Prize; 
•SI ,000 cash 
•Commemorative award 
•Featured in AMERICAN 
Woodworker 
2nd Prize: 
•S300 cash 
•Award certificate 
3rd Prize: 
•S200 cash 
•Award certificate 



Professional Category 
Ut Prize: 
•SI, 000 cash 
•Commemorative award 
•Featured in American 
Woodworker 
2nd Prize: 
•$300 cash 
•Award certificate 
3rd Prize: 
•S200 cash 
•Award certificate 

Student Category 

1st Prize: 
•SI, 000 cash 
•Commemorative award 
•Featured in AMERICAN 

Woodworker 

2nd Pttie: 
•S300 cash 
•Award certificate 
3rd prize: 
•S20G cash 
•Award cert Miotic 



1994 

iVIIItK \\ 
\V(H»imoKkKK 



EXCELLENCE IN 

CRAFTSMANSHIP 

AWARDS 

COMPETITION 



^Number of pieces hcin^ entered 



Name. 



Address 
Gity_ 



(up ta (up co three) 

On a separate sheet of paper, describe each piece in 

100 words or lcss> 

Mail entry to: Excellence in Craftsmanship Awards, 

American Woodworker 

13 E, Minor Street, Emmaus, PA 18098. 



State 



.Zip. 



Phone 

Award Category (cheek one only) 

Q Professional 3 Amateur Q Student 



I agree to abide by 
decision a* final- 

Signature 



and accept the judges 1 



Deadline for entries is September 1st, 1994, 



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AMERICAN WOODWORKER A. JUNE i 9 9 4 73 



IOD FACTS 



Species 

Tectona grandis (Southeast Asia, 
including India, Thailand. Burma, 
Java, and Indonesia) 

Trade Names 

Commonly traded throughout the 
Western world as teak, this hardwood 
is known in local growing regions by 
such names as sagun, kyun, tcgina, 
rn.ii sak. djati. gia thi. jati sak r tekku, 
pahi t and tadi. True teak should nor 
he confused with the many unrelated 
look-alikes, such as afrormosla, iroko 
and ovangkol (shedua or amazakoue), 
which arc often marketed as varieties 
of "African teak/ 

Appearance 

When freshly cut, teak has a paic yet* 
low color that darkens with exposure 
to air and light. In Burmese and Thai 
varieties, the heart wood develops an 
even golden-brown color with hints 
of olive green Other varieties, includ- 
ing plantation growth, may he deeper 
brown in color with chocolate-brown 
markings. Grain lines are straight to 
wavy with occasional mottled figure. 
Freshly planed leak is oily or waxy to 
the touch, and has a pleasant musky 
odor similar to leather. The texture is 
dull and luster less, and the surface is 
rough and coarse. 

Workability 
Because teak is hard, it's best to drill 
pilot holes for screws or dowels. 
Though die wood will machine with 
only moderate resistance, it has a 
severe blunting effect on cutters, mak- 
ing carbide-tipped cutters a necessity. 
In spite of its high oil content, teak 
can be glued effectively, but this 
should be done immediately after 
planing. Oil-based finishes produce 
the best results. In outdoor applica- 
tions, the sun will bleach the wood 
surface white. However, teak's color 



TEAK 

By Dick Boak 

can be rejuvenated by reoiling, and 
there are a number of special teak 
cleaners and finishes available. 

Technical Properties 
With an average specific gravity of 
Oh 65 (4(> pounds per cubic ft,), teak is 
a medium-density wood, but it is quite 
hard. Live trees are so heavy, they will 
sink in water. Because of this, the 
bark and sap wood are generally ''gir- 
dled" or stripped three years prior to 
felling, E>eprived of nourishment, the 
standing tree dies and the leaves uti- 
lize all the sap stored in the trunk, 



As an inhabitant of die monsoon rain 
forest, the teak tree can attain sizes up 
to 40 ft. in circumference and 150 ft. 
in height. Teak is typically .sold in 
sizes 6 in, or wider and 6 ft, or longer, 
in thicknesses of 4/4 through 8/4, 
with (occasional 10/4 and 12/4 sizes 
sold at premium prices. 

Susta inability 
Initial harvesting of Burmese teak in 
the late 1800s served as a forestry 

model for half a century. Today, while 
plantation*grown teak is helping prc- 




Common teak, at left, has straight to wavy grain marking*, but some pieces will 
have a mottled figure, or dark lines like the piece at right. 



This yields a trunk light enough to be 
hauled (often by elephant) to the 
river's edge, where it can be floated 
to port. When correctly dried, teak is 
stable and moves little in service. 

Uses 
Because of its durability and resis- 
tance to decay, teak is extremely suit- 
able for outdoor use. It is utilized 
extensively in the marine industry for 
docks, boat hulls, decks, hatches, rails 
and trim. It is used widely for high- 
priced deck or garden furniture^ cabi- 
netry, flooring, interior and exterior 
joinery, woodturning, decorative 
veneers and c ah i net-grade plywood, 
So-called * Danish" furniture is often 
made from solid teak and teak 
veneers. Since it is not harmed by 
acids or alkalis, teak is used for chemi- 
cal vats and laboratory benches. 



serve the species, virgin timber is 
being illegally cut and smuggled, 
which could jeopardize the future sus- 
tainability and availability' of teak. 

Availability 
Though the market for teak is 
extremely large, the wood is primarily 
available through large specialty wood 
dealers, teak brokers or larger lumber 
yards only, 

Cost 

The wholesale cost for * First 
European Quality "-grade teak (the 
usual grade of good lumber) in 500- 
bd. ft, quantities is around $6 per bd 
ft. Tins translates to a retail price of $9 
to 510 per bd. ft. Discounts are 
offered for shorts and narrows, and 
premiums are charged for wide or 
fixed widths or long lengths. A 






74 AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1904 




■THE BEST BLADES IN THE BUSINESS 

Guaranteed Or Your Money Back! 



Since 1946. Forrest has been a leader in 
manufacturing high quality saw blades. 
The secret to our success is attention la 
detail. We incorporate handwork into each blade 
and consistently hold blade runout Id between 
0.001 and 002 ia We also use micro-grain, 
corrosion rasistant C 4 carbide tips, and hone 
them to a razor- sharp, mirror finish with 600-gril 
diamond wheels. A3 1 this guarantees you excep- 
tionally smooth cuts and extends hlado lite up 
to 300% longer than other carbide blades. 
Over 100. DM owners already know that saw 
blades don't get any belief than Forrest. 



WOODWORKER II 

THE BEST BLADE FOR YOUR TABLE SAW 



No general purpose Wade produced belief 
results than the Forrest Woodworker II 

» Wood magazine. Sepi S3 issw 
This all-purpose blade: 

« Ends boiiom splintering 

< Ends scratc+iy saw cuts 

* Ends blade changing— 
nps 8 crosscuts 
You get a ready-to-gloe joint right off the saw 
Specs; 15 C ATB. *20 J face hook 
Dia. Teeth Kerf Bore Litf SALE 




12* 40.. 1/r „r 

l£ iiiuiii w\l 4li,iiiii IrO iiliHH 1 



10*,-,,., 

1U flPIHF 

ar 

8 1/4\„ 
8". 

r 

6 m 




40 
30 
40 
30 
40 
40 
30 
30 
40 



.. 3^2"* ... 

.„3tt2"-.. 
...3/32".... 
... 3/32" .... 



5,fl" 

579" 
5(8" 

5.8" 

5/e* 

5/8* 



. 3/32- ... 5. S" . 



..$183.. 

i ■ L 1 IOC ■ I 

... 1S6-. 
.... 135.. 
.... 146.. 
..., 125... 

I in 1 -JO ■■ 

.... 136 ... 

115.. 

112.. 

139.. 



$129 
. 119 
. 119 
99 
. 109 
... 99 
... 99 
... 99 

... eg 

69 

... tw 



"1/8* Kerf available 



WOO i WORKER I 

THE BEST flLAOE FOR YOUR RADIAL ARM SAW 



Woodworker l gives you: 
- Mirror- smooth cuts 
* No bottom and top splinter 
in push/pull mode on radial 
arm saw 
Specs: 30" ATB. +5 L face hook 

Dia Teelh Keii Bore 




''WW 

List SALE 



12V....... 60 1/8".,.., 

10 ,.„..,. 60 i 4 .,.,. 3.' 32 ..,. 

W + .. 60 + ™ 3^2"^ 

61/4-.... 60 „...,. 3/32*.... 

tjt L.J ■■■ ■ •■■ ■ fc \f\f I m LI ■ IB 4JA*lj#ki ■ k I ■ 



5mV,$198.,. *139 
StB' t „.< 162.,. 129 

5/B" 156. 119 

5/8" M .„ 150 109 

5.'B' 150 109 



DURALfNE HI-AT 

THE BEST BLADE FQfl PLYWOOD 
& LAMINATES 



•The ultimate tor splinter-tree cuts 
Specs : 40 J ATB. +5 r face hook 

Dia. Teeth Kerf Bore List 



SALE 



12' ,..,,„ 100 ,-.... 1/8" H.m*.* I 1 " . ... S253 — J215 



f £ 4IH4^lh VV H1 + thllh llV 4HI-4I + I4 ' IMIM 4£ " t P ' H i 



10* 60 3*32" „„5»" 207...... 1S9 

9* ,8Q 3/32" ....&BV.... 207 179 

B* 80 3/32" ,.,,5/S" 202 1§9 

7W..,.W,. tM H3«r- SB* 149 1S9 

"1/9" Ken available 

Bonng up to r J>4" MxfaDm an aJ) Fotrmt btadrs. $7.50 tMtr* 



181 



CHOPMASTER 

THE BEST BLADE FOR YOUR SU04KG COMPOUND 0A CHOP MITEfi SAW 



Our negative 5'- face hook and extremely flat blade gtve you tight, smooth, spdnter -tree mlier jams. 
Guaranteed! 

AwailabtB lor Ihe&o saws: Dia. Teeth Bore List SALE 

S89 



Delia Sidekick 6 1/2" , 6 1/2" 

Sears 8 i/4 4 & Delta,, B W 

Hitachi 6 VT. DeWall fi flyobi 8 1/2" 

Ryobi, Makita & all others 10* .. 

Hitachi, BAD. EteWalt 12* .. 

Ryobi, Makita , ,.., 14",, 

Hitachi .. 15" .. 



DADO KING DELUXE 



. 40 Stt" 

. 60 Sffl" 

.80 5/8' 

.80 5/8" 

.80 r 

100 r 



THE BEST DADO SET! 



Oui -performed 32 other dado sets. 
'No learoLrl on all five woods tested," 

Fprip Woodworking, Jury/August Si 
Superior to 29 other dado sets. "Best value I" 

Wood iflAQ&rtwt. October Si 

• Cuts i/8" to 2&'32" flat bottom grooves 

• Cuts wiih or across grain in all woods and 
laminates with no learout 

• No splintering due to negative face hook on 
4-tooth choppers & 24-tooth outside biades 

• New 3/32" chipper &. shims included 
- Clean cuts all your groves 

****** 

List SALE 

8" dia, set, 5'B - bore S321 .... S289 

10" dia. set S78" or V bOfe. + „ 389 ., 349 

(BorfoQtip tO i i.-4 m :S2Sp&&tt 



BLADE DAMPENERS/ST1FFENERS 

HELPS ALL YOUR BLADES CUT BETTER & QUtETER 



• Reduces r4oise 50%-7S% 

- Stops vtbf atk>n & flutter 

■ Reduces blade ring 

■ Produces a smoother cut 

- Only need one dampener — does not 
offset blade! 

4"— $21 5"— $24 6 M — $S5 





FACT: Duratine Hi- AT 
with dampener hi iffener is the 
quietest blade on the market! 

You've probably read the recent ankles on 
the new "quiet" blades, But the fact of the 
matter Is a Forrest 80 tooth Dur aline HI- AT 
with blade stiff ener cuts 50% quieter than 

those so -cd lied "quiet" blades. 



So ordtr your mw blade and stiff erwr today and find 

Oul why SerlQu s Wogchvorkers prefer Fcrrest Blades. 

Satisfaction guaranteed or full cash refund. 



.$149 

,., 170 99 

...179..... 109 
...204..,.. 119 
...207 129 

.266 179 



,H«"I, 



* 00 I .,..,. 277 1 89 




Look What Our Customers Say: 

You are the best I Your blades are the 
host 1 Your service is the best 1 

■Herbert Needttnan, Gteentawn. NY 

I recently ordered your Woodworker I & It 
saw blades lor my radial and table saws. 1 
find your blades to be the highest quality, 
T hoy produce a. velvet cut with a polished 
finish- The quality 15 not JUSt good— it rS 

exceptional 

■David Hares, St. Louis, MO 

(Your) Woodworker II Wade is by far the 
finest saw blade that I have ever used. I 
also have the Forrest dado set which is 
without a doubt the king of alt dado sets. I 
work exclusively with red oak and oak 
veneer plywood, and the dado set per- 
forms splinter -Iree cuts as advertised. 

-P&nnis $chute r Ot*atanna t MN 



451 Fiver Road 
Clifton. NJ 07014 

Made & Serviced In America Since 1945 

ORDER TOLL FREE 
800-733-7111 

(IN NJ: 201-473-5236) - FAX: 201-471-3333 

(Must mention Ammican Woodworks* 

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and extra bonus!) 

4£ S SB 



SHIPPING CHARGES 

Dado sets: , , , $5.50 

SWieners: ,.... ..-.. $2-50 



SPECIAL OFFER! SHARPENING DISCOUNT! 

Order today. And get S30 of sharpening discount coupons FREE. 

Order your Forrest saw blade today and you II get SIX $5.00 sharpening discouni 
coupons. Coupons are good on any make ot carbide blade and dado set! (But 
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Our factory sharpening will make any blade cut better! Give us a try, 2-4 day turn- 
around. 10" x 40T— $15,00: 10' x 60T— £17 75. Return postage: $4 50 blade. 



CHGLC NO 74 ON WCOUCT WOftkWTON row 



IT FINISHING 



RUBBING OUT A SATIN FINISH 

A Final Treatment That Leaves Your Finish Feeling as Good as ft Looks 

By Michael Dresdner 




It's all well and 
good for a finish to 

look great, but if you 
want a finish that 
w'tli feel as good as it 
looks, you ' 11 need to 
rub it out. 
Rubbing out a fin* 
ish means working it with a mik! ahni 
sivc such as pumice or steel wool. 
The abrasive produces extremely fine, 
uniform "scratches" that go in the 
direction of the wood grain, helping 
to hide both brush marks and the 
"orange peer texture common to 
sprayed finishes. And + while the result 
will not appear much different from 
satin lacquer or varnish, it will make 
the finish feel satin- smooth. 

Rubbing to satin is easier than rub- 
bing to gloss. A rubbed satin finish 
hides a multitude of sins, while a 
rubbed gloss finish shows every 
minute flaw. Although you use some 
sort of abrasive in both cases, the 
materials and methods for a gloss rob 
are very different. Rather than "gloss 
over" this important area of finishing, 
I'll deal with it in a future column. 

Virtually any film-forming finish can 
be rubbed, as long as the dried film is 
thick enough to prevent cutting 
through to the wood, A good rule of 
thumb is that the film should be at 
least 4 mils (0,004 in.) thick for even a 
light rub. That's roughly equivalent to 
four coats of sprayed lacc|ucr r or two 
coats of brushed varnish , shellac or 
polyurethanc. Wipe-on finishes, such 
as drying oils, Danish oil, and French 
polish, dcin"t need to he rubhed, since 
they usually go on very smoothly. 
Waxes and nondrying oils do not form 
films, so they don't get rubbed either. 
For rubbing out, it doesn't matter 
whether you start with a satin or a 
gloss finish. But you will get a clearer 
satin-rubbed finish if you use gloss lac- 



quer or varnish. This is because satin 
lacquers and varnishes contain "flat- 
ting agents" — ullrafine particles of 
sand or wax that diffract light. If you 
build up several layers of finish con- 
taining these particles, the clear film 
will start to look cloudy, A gloss finish 
rubbed to satin will retain more of its 
original clarity. 

Abrasives and Lubricants 

There are two common methods used 
to nib a finish. The more traditional 
way is to mix FFFF pumice {sec 
Sources) with water to make an abra- 




To rub out a satin finish, you work the 
surface writh a mid abrasive such as 
pumice or steel wool, using soap, oil or 
wax as a lubricant, 

sivc slurry. You rub tht: slunrv across 
the surface with a fell block, replen- 
ishing it with more slurry when it 
stops working, or with water if it gets 
too dry and crusty. For a higher 
sheen, you can follow up with anoth- 
er slurry of mineral oil or 
paraffin oil mixed with rot- 
tens tone, an even finer abra- 
sive powder. 

I prefer the more modern 
method, using 0000 steel 
wool or utirafine nylon abra- 
sivc pads along with a rub- 
bing lubricant, such as soapy 
water or liquid wax. Finish 
supply catalogs sell jelled 
soap-type lubricants with 
names like Wool-Lube (see 



Sources), which arc meant to be 
mixed with water. But any pure soap, 
such as Murphy's Oil Soap, works just 
as well. Personally t I like to use paste 
wax thinned with mineral spirits, 
Although soapy water cuts a bit faster 
and leaves your hands sparkling clean, 
wax adds a layer of protection and 
leaves the finish feeling slicker. 

Rubbing Out 

Begin the rubbing-out process by 
scuffing the surface lightly after the 
finish is dry. Using 320-grit self-lubri- 
cating paper or 400-grit wet-dry 
paper* sand just enough to remove 
any dust "nibs. 1 " 

When the surface feels smooth you 
are ready to rub. Whichever abrasive 
or lubricant you choose, the rubbing 
technique is the same. For a flat sur- 
face, such as a tableiop, hit the edges 
first witli short back-and-iorth strokes. 
Then rub in long, even strokes, the 
length of the entire top if possible, 
gradually working from one edge to 
the other, Keep your hand flat as you 

When rubbing, keep your fingers flat 
on the surface and work with your 
hand perpendicular to the grain of the 
wood. This will give you a more even 
surface and reduce the chances you 
wifl cut through the finish, especially 
at the edges. 




t 

£ 
8 



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AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 199 4 



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c;r»CLL '-:.- *9 O r naa, ct f.-iWi.'^, ronM 



lm agine using a power tool 
to sand all those areas where be- 
fore, you had to fold up a piece of 
paper and "finger sand." With 
the Fein Triangle" Sander 
you can sand right up to, 
into, and along edges 8c cor- 
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or altering the profile. 

Unlike ordinary sanders, 
the PKIN Triangle"Sander doesn't 
rotate, rather it "oscillates" (a side 
to side movement) at a blurring 
20,000 times a minute. This 
unique action combined with the 
distinct triangular sanding pad, 
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away from, or bouncing off of the 
edge line. 

The sanding pad can be 
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The Fein "Triangle 11 Sander 
takes the drudgery out of hand 
sanding and frees up hours of 
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It's easy to get more infor- 
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Fax (412)331-3599 

© Fein Power Tools, Inc, 1992 

OfKXL NO *S ON PqOOUtT HF DHIAfcT Eh FDRM 




3E 






go over ihe ends of the board to avoid 
rubbing through the sharp edges, (Sec 
bottom photo, page 76, > Your rub- 
bing pattern should cover the entire 
top evenly. 1 Like to repeat this pattern 
at least six times to make sure that 
every square inch is uniformly abrad- 
ed, Don't be afraid to put some pres- 
sure on the pad; rubbing out should 
be a good aerobic workout. 

On frame -and -panel pieces, start 
with the raised panel, then move out 
to the frame. To avoid cross-grain 
scratches where the frame members 
meet, lay a piece of masking tape along 
the joint line when you rub the rails, 
then reverse it when you rub the stiles, 

When you think you've rubbed 
enough, squeegee an area with your 
thumb and then feel the surface. If it is 
as smooth as you want it, wipe off the 
lubricant or slurry with a soft rag. 

If you used wax as your lubricant, 
you may find that wiping does not 
remove all the excess wax. Simply 



sprinkle the surface with cold water 
and rub the surface again with a clean 
piece of steel wool. Press gently this 
time, and wipe once up the surface 
and once hack. When you're done, 
the pad should be covered with the 
excess wax. 

An Unusual Alternative 

The rubbing method I've described 

calls for rubbing with the grain, so 
that the small scratches you create 
blend in. Hut I would he remiss if J 
didn't tell you about the method my 
best friend uses to rub out brushed 
varnish. After sanding the last coat of 
dried varnish, he applies a thin coat of 
paste wax but does not wipe it off, lie 
then goes over the entire surface with 
a piece of ultrafine Scotch-Brit e 
attached to the pad of a finishing 
sandcr. Rather than worry about the 
direction of the scratches, he lets the 
high speed of the palm sander 
(10,000 to 15,000 rpm) hide them. 



Tile ultrafine Scotcli-Brite produces 
a matte finish. For semi-gloss, he sub- 
stitutes #8440 "Doodlebug" white 
cleaning pads (available from janitori- 
al supply houses). When he is fiij> 
Lshed, he simply buffs off the excess 
wax with a clean, dry cloth. He says 
it's less work than rubbing by hand, 
and to tell the truth, he gets darn 
good results. A 

SOURCE BOX 

Pumice, rottenstone, paraffin oil and 

Woo I- Lube are available from: 

Garrett Wade 

161 Ave. of the Americas 

New Vork t NY 10013 

(SOOl 221-2942 

Circle #662 

Woodworker's Supply 

5604 Alameda Place NE 

AEhuquerque, NM S7113 

(BOO) 645*9292 

Cirde #6&3 



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TOOLWORKS 

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7 AMERICAN WOODWORKER A 



TAKE A CLOSER LOOK 



PEBFORMAX 

16-32 




Yotil enjoy taking a doser look at your 
finished project when its been sanded by a 
PERFORMAX 16-32, Tills space-saving 
benchtop drum sander will surface, drmension 
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non-adhesive abrasive strips range irom 36 to 
220 griL Sand slock as wide as 3£" in two passes, 
as short as 2 1/4". and as thick as 3". Scroll saw 
cutouts can be sanded In seconds. 

A PERFORMAX 16-32 WTO Exceed Your 
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Industrial Panel 
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SAVE YOUR COPIES 
OF AMERICAN 
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Slufdy QQlrJ'iJilad maraon 
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Oscillator reduces blade, bit, and burn marks 




to dust which your vac neatly pulls through the 



built-in dust port. All of which makes The Oscillator a perfect companion for your scroll, jig, or band saw. 
And a shortcut to the silky, shapely curves you've always dreamed about. If curves attract you now, 
just wait 'til you Oscillate them. 






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onae na b on wcouct hforuatch hprm 




"You tell me what kind of wood you're working with and the kind 
of results you want — and I'll show you how to make it happen. 

—BOB FLEXNER, Finishing Expert 



♦ NO RUNS! 

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UNPE 



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WOOD 



No matter what kind ot wood you re 
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Finishing expert Bob Flexner will give 
you the brand-name advice aiul tie}*-hy-$\tp 
fcsimtfiom you need io achieve lint rate 
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project 

You'll find hisexpen lips .unl tech- 
niques in UNDERSTANDING WOOD \ 
FINISHING — yours frtr fn» 2: iiv* when 
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You II learn how specific hrmhes work 
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♦ Why you should always keep varnish coats 
tk k PACE 1 39. 

♦ Why you should NHVHR use a lack cluth wiih water- 
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♦ How to lighten — or even change — the color of a stain 
after you've applied it to the wood. PACE 77. 

♦ One of the quickest and most effective ways to repair 
nicks and scratches. Easy and on PAGE 252 

♦ Using polyurelhaner Be careful — it docs NOT bond 
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Step-by-stcp instructions, thorough explanations, plus 
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flow fP * 



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,j 



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^ririf 



Route 



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1 
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1 
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□ Mr. OMrs. 
D Ms. 3 Miss 



FREE 21-DAY 
SHOP TEST! 



YliS! Pltaw ru%h mc my t^py of 
UM>|yttSTASl)INt . w i K >l>riMSI I 

INti hi cjcatiiittr fkl-t- h>r 3 I days tf | 
decide to keep ii.lll pay for 11 1 n four easy 
inunlhlv imullmL-nU nl S*99 ($7.99 
CDN fund* pint GST) each, pint po^ta^c 
and handing 1 There h iil. minc-ii m ftmnoe 
lImtjkh ( )th<!rw*<< I'll rriufn ihs ttoot with- 
in 2 1 day* and owe nuihint 

FREE IK >NUv Ai«t %cnd me 1 frcr copy of 
I'tujriu&uil Kutitrr iuf% ami TtikntifMn U\ mine tu 
keep even it I return UNIifRSTANDINC 
WOOD FINISHING 

M SAVE C ASHi Send ymir $27 05 ($1 j 95 
Ct)N hinds n lit v GST' paytnrnt ni*ta\ and wr'H 
pay the poita^e and handling char^rt Same 
retum ptfrvilcnev i\ jl>>vti <PA, GA, NY. IL and 
CA residents, please add vtatc sale* lax. ] 

14**46 



Name 



(Fust) 



<Lasi) 



Address 



Apt. if 



City Slate Zip 

Send no money now. Jus! clip and mall this coupon today to: 
RODALE BOOKS, Dept. Q. Emmaus, PA 16099. 

Printed In USA 
| DSW1574? 



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AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 





Classified rates - $5.50 per word, 15 word minimum, 

For more information write or caJI: American Wcxhwokkea, Diutic WuJlbillich, 

33 East Minor Street, Emmaus, PA 18098, (610) 96"^8123. 



WtKRl 



FREE SCRAP LUMBER— For a complete list 
of sources in your urea, send SASE + SI. 95 
Ck/MO to: K. Cobb. 122 l>eSanders, Laming. 
Ml 4H9(»6- 

20BF IH-'IK PACKS of selected lumber: 
Chcny 52 2H h(; Kcd elm S 1 65 hi; 'V Red 
oalc $2.15 SL\.tt, Atldi I ion j I specie*. FREli cata- 
log. Visa/MaitrrCard. lijd^fr Hardwoods of 
Wisconsin Lid., North 1517 llwy. 14, Suite 
AWt5 r Walwonh, Wl 5 r UH4 (BOO* 252-2573- 

QLttLTED. CURLY, Hurl, galled— maple- 
boards, blocks, flooring. 25 bf SHORTS 
SPHCIAL, shipping included— Figured $110; 
Plain SHtJ. Handle Woods, P.O. JioX 96 T 
Handle, WA. (HtHi) H45.ttH2. 

GABON EBONY BlIJiTTS, lumber & squares 
from Sl.50/lb. (61*)) 434-3030. 

CALIFORNIA'S FINEST QUALITY Hurls; 
Redwood lace, maples, buckeye, walnut, 
madrone. rnan/juiia. mynlewood, etc. 
Direct, All uses. Burl Tree, (800) 7«5M T RL 
(2875). 

RED OAK! Sel/Fas, 6'-8' lengths— S 2, 2Wbf; 
I no bf— S2J9/bf; 10'"+ — S2.79/fof; 
Quartersawn— S3.2^/hf. Visa/MC. Eiasl woods 
Co., 429 Mullen, HornelU NY 14843, (HoO) 
6964010, 

BEST BUTTERNUT ANYWHERE? 4/4*16/4; 
4 uV-16 in. wide. Uihcx qualily hardwoods 
clear white pine up to 24 in, wide. OiU for 
free price list. Tuckaway Timber Co., Lyme, 
NH 03"6a. (603) 79VI534. 






* 



■jW 



Iw 



jW**^ JJ J^S • [M*** 



j&<**! 







hU^U 



♦New Uupmcm of Smart Wood 
from Fiji £i reasonable prices. 

+N on- offering the hint Edition of IsTLKSAriUVAL 
Sam^LI-V S1J1 ci. In ecu of 6 dtiihir 11, 00 ei. 

+Hviuu&il miwn trodc Itf 4*" <£ HP 
neck up u» B" wkldu, in ti^ht tpttiu. 

No minimum * UriKhiw?* Sample* + MC'/VIm 

1VO, Box (.10, tljrbcrnlk, CA 95542 

1*00) 256-3479 



"GOOD WOOD" Pennsylvania hardwood*. 
Many species & sizes. FRLE catalog, 
Crofrwood Mills. RD *J, Uox J4C Driftwood, 
PA 11832, 

FANTASTIC INVENTORY— Logs, lumber, 
turning blanks, instrument woods. Catalog 
$2.<X*. Gilmer Wood Co., 221 1 NVV St. Helens 
Koad, Portland, OR 97210. <5o*) 274-1271. 

GOOD HOPE HARDWOODS— Curly cher- 
ry, walnut, figured mahogany and lijtcf 
maple. Highly figured Cliiro walnut in 
matched sets for fine furniture and in flitches 
up to 54 in. wide by 13 ft. lone.. Norman 
Hughes, 1627 New London Rd., Landcnbcrg, 
PA 19310. (610) 274-8842, 




HANDL0GGERS 

Exotic Hardwoods 

Smcr 1978* 50 Sfrt its 

aWlESTlCLVOTlLJAM* SUSTAINABLE 

YlELLHLMflllH * KARF. ► KILN PRIED 

; - • Sir rn ix i* Wile Wd, Lrbfv. CA ' 

Fm. MdOnkr CitA* 8CO-4*l-1-WW 




Sawmill 
Kiln 

Hardwoods 
Exotics 

WILLARD BROTHERS VVCO DC UTTERS 

300 BjiS(fi Road, Trillion . N J 06619 

Call (GQ9) 690 1 990 



HEW" 1995/1994 90-FAGC 
WOODWORKING TOOL « 
SUPPLIES CATALOG 

&f t*d S3 r Kefn ifd> M* on four 
firat Order. llnOrdtf »10, 



"*71 



WwclEflTtijHOWbWOOOf 



kJL 



COMPANY 



330 AAitby Ave. 
EterHefey, CA 94710 
O10>B4>4390 



JjJ 



Unicorn 
Universal 
WOODS, 



-70 lumber jLfittt:itt& 

-wmcmUmnt selection 
*Mfi+Ct*llY VrtHHf* 
■ittnifrty rttiflwQtk 
m pif woods vanmari 
*¥vtrofmimtr *t*tMil *m*tf Qfdlf *ftP9 C4t#fQg 
ph. 4i a aii j 3d a t»i *rt a&i ansa 

4l#0 STEELE a *V W wQOQflfiltiaE , OrtT., CJLti. L4l iS$ 




■QtoLnrH.aDw»DS 



Cherry, maple— curly 

birds-ev^ walnut, oak, 

poplar and much more. 

Solid Hardwood 

Turning Squares 

Qunrier&nwn 

Whlt^Oak 

800-758-0950 



ORIiGON" WAUNUTj Highest quality, wide 
matched set*. Vertical ^rjiti ami rigured. Kiln 
Dried Nurthwesi Timber, P,C, lk)X 1010. 
jeiTersort, OR 97^52- (^3) 327-KM)O r 

CRAFTU'OOD NORTlltRN White eedar T 
botternul, clierr) 1 and cuber ?iptxtes ,j k, U, **i T 
W„ vi inch tluckness. Pinned 2 sides, ripped 2 
edges. 1U0% guaranteed. Send for catalog. 
Phone (207) 425-291 1 Hartford Woodworks, 
Box il-B, Blaine, ME 0*734. 

TURNING BLOCKS; Squarcs/burls/slabs & 
veneers 60> Species. Imported & domestic 
hardwoods, Woodply Lumber— A^, 100 
Bennington Avenue, Frecporc NY 11520. 
<800> 554-9002. 

WIDE QUARTERSAWN Wliite & red oik, 
lumber & flooring, Plus figured lumber, 
Talarko Hardwoods, RD*3, Box 3266, 
Mohnton. PA 19540. (610)7754)400. 

SAWMILL DIRECT— 100% Legal cocoboio/ 
bocotc from managed fonrst Urgcst invento- 
rj r in the LIS, Large list of squares, lumber, 
logs, turning stock. MSO: Fbon> ■, tulip wood, 
7-irieotc, lignum virae, pink ivory-, snakcwixnl 
and iTtorc . Used woodiuming lathes. S.A.S.E: 
Tropical Exotic Hardwoods, Box 1806. 
Curlsbad. CA 92016. (619) 454-3030. 
Visa/MC. 



QUALITY NORTHERN APPALACHIAN 
HARDWOOD 



FREE delivery. Bundled, surfaced, stwink- wrapped 
Saisbcron Guaranteed. 

NIAGARA LUMBER & WOOD PRODUCTS, INC. 

47 Elm Street East Aurora, NY 14052, 

(800) 274-0397. 



HARDWOODS CUT TO 

• 120 ipecm in nock * ¥90440 * Bortiey finis*w^ 

• Hardware * Books * Hottiwood moiidrtQi 

i wood Trom V/ lo A" Unc*. 

* Butt & blocks io« luoon * 

COLONIAL HARDWOODS INC. 

7?53 Corfwon ftrewn Ct. ■ Spmoli&ldL W 22^53 



f I NEST CALIFORNIA WOODS 

YY4lnm ^Ijplr. MyHJr. MjEj^ute. REJi**jod. Sequentially 

cut Mw edge k»g,v large s^bs our ^pcclatty: 

Up to 43* taklt 20' tonq, 5' tnlck. B«uliful ■rnkirrcl imd 

nqiUfCd fcOOidi SfTOAL' FTC cut llf* English At Clara 

WUflut *fc mvflM?>*i-Kwl tctjntj ttotal Uj/iKJi: J'-» L.SO; 

V-f2;cT-»+;a'-»7r HT-J11; ir-»15r U"-«l; 

16'-*27. MinEmum ord» i50 

Peter Lang Co* »" 707979 3 mi 

ii 1 5 Ftrfia crceh RchjKi. s*m* Rniui, tA 'J.MU4 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1 994 



8 1 



Wood Parts/Supplies 



SPRAY-ON SUEDE. « . Free brochure A sam- 
ple. Donjcr Products, llene Court, Hull ding 
8A, Bellcmcad, NJ 0*K02 <H*XJ) 53&6^~. 

WOODWORKER'S 1994 CATALOG contain- 
ing wooden toy parts,, whirligigs, clucks and 
pans, chair cane, lamp parts, tools, finishing 
material*, hardware, plans, etc. Send SI. 00. 
Barap Specialties, AW0594, 835 Bellows, 
Frankfort, MJ 4%35. 



VELVIT PRODUCTS 

Vthrt OM: an rtnvr urooc htttTi ^al scan 'lit i:a«tt A 
ptocioi wood n crv jippfcaticn M[im»n»nc» hM No Wl 
10 vwnifh CaWl i Dm* F1wh: Ptonor tfwo hnnii that « 
*ep pervtuarg frmUa o< e*s. f«nt tungodes £ *at« 
pracfing cottpcunds Chamgird Wood Trutmanti: arfr 
moU I rrtkfew tmnmmt dail lur b$* man wcnl t» Mrttd tor 
mcrfihi af1a» rwy rn mile 3. 
VELVIT PRODUCTS COMPANY, RO. Sen 1741, 
Depl. AW. Apple Ion, W I 5-491 3. (414) 722-6355 



CLOCK MAKERS 
QUARTZ MOVEMENTS 



Reg. Mini, Pendulum, Electronic 

Chime, and All Accessories. 

FREE CATALOG 

VILLAGE ORIGINALS 

1-800-899-1314 



))m\ D^e * 



RESTORERS 



WE DHffl * ffhDLESm HUlCG FQFl AAllSAhS WlTh rlfHS TDL 
CMifcO: FIND FHDH WT CTHER 3KUI 5GLR*E. NCLUOkNC OIL 
1JUUP5 JJ0 PARTS. LAIGEST SCLECTD! 1HA55 H*HQ« JUtE Ih J & 
ft'DPO tNfthlNG CJUphQ. MSKITBV lUTIHi^S Cifl^UGS 
MDLtaK. HiAOiWD lUUKHi, tfENfERS, ADLLTDF 315* FAflT£ 
CUrniOCHHA CAEUttt GLASS, i I C CAT AlOG UHlM JU»T OThER' 

CATALOG; §1. 00 
VANDYKE SDf pi I J. PC ■*> Itl «MHHCin SO *T]IS 



eRneffiooD 1 ™ colored iaMin&Te 

1 the ultimate pen and bowl blwih I 

Multi-tone d diagonally-striped pen blank 

plus unloue woodturnino catalog - $1.00 

12 a»ort»d pen blanks & catalog * $10.00 

Pull Circle \> ooJiuriiftre Markotp! u «• 

60<7 ftth Strwt SrooA/y/i, NYH21B (5CQ4&2-9701) 




LIBERON ™ /star ™ Sipp/us 

ft P. a Jtoi eV, Af mbm* CA S*4&> 
CWif D*s* Onfyr 300-245-56U 
For Information 707-9^7-0375 

Carnauba & Beeswaxes 

BLACK BISON Cabinet Makers Wax 

Aniline Dyes, UBERON Stael Woct 

Stains, HOT STUFF Instant Glues 

Star™ Touch-Up & Repair Supplies 






Cotiutim 



Sinct 




1916 



AUTHENTIC RIPRODLOTO^S! 

Quility mr«jcr«(ad Eurqptan 
hudum Puitct tor r*tlo*a- 

i ji ■_«• ecritiicn el line 
a&rrtjy . fc*r*iftut*, ooor*. and 

a ■■. — ■ *■■ Mr -, r.i n Id 
incline, bras*, wood, and 
pofc*4a»n aide wortde 
pKWes Baautilul nJLutog 
Wiring e«4 I*,* 41 Over 
1000 ■««* pictured it 
actual pze 200 ppqk 
With frriil ruHory ef 
European Hvtytn 
5»V£H«ID 
#w**# #tff HAJ0MK 00, 



CANING AND BASKFTWT,A\TNG Supplies, 
Large variety including Shaker tape, books, 
h an tiles > tools, brown, ash, other naturals. 
Retail. Wholesale. Catalog SI. 50. Royal wood 
Ltd., 51-AW, Woodville Hd., Mansfield, OH 
44907,M19)526-1630\ 

Tt>ols/Kq u I pmc n t 

SAVE BIG TIME! Etand&iws, jiiirner*. planers. 
itaws, drill prus-st 1 *, muvtrs, duM colltrciors, 
Mid-Atlanlie region only. CDi^vlOfn, 

FINEST QtrAJJTY Hand-forged caning loots. 
Small scorns, drawknives p bent knives. 1-RtiJ- 
catalog, North Bay Fon?e> Box A3. Waldron, 
WA 9829"^. 

SHARP JAPANESE TOOLS SINCE 1888. 

Professional results FREE catalog, 'I a* hint's, 
2030 .ith Ave. South, Seattle, WA 98134, 
Telephone (206) 62 Nil 99. Fax (2i>6) 621- 
01 S7. 

ANTIQUE TOOLS and primitives. Rill 
Phillips, 1555 Goldenkey Road, New Tripoli, 
PA 18066 {610>2B5^2W. 



OSCILLATING SWINDLE fANDIHS 

on yo/ dm. pntt m 1 Inctkyi d ?w oofl 
otiOedcMaJBftier. 

Htmt dwgesvar, hao loofai req^rad. 

Eidem tfaxuni dun Fe-rHva" -7^ t 

30 Oty Kith Fff Trill. 
FrMlrto. S«TdfiOSASE DrCiH203-47J-otSa 

GPOESIGNSJMC,, dep: a 

24 Wll Ipfd RiMd. Sh*«on r CT O&tM 




Ml lOODrUHEl'! CilMOGI 

WOOD 

Turning* 

TOOLS * SUPPLIES 



s*:id *l Ld: Packard Wood works 

Dcpt AW3* FOBoi 719. Tt>™. KC J»TH2 



INTIRNATIONAL TOOL AUCTION 

Announcing the uk of ovef TOGO lott 0< qv#lii)f 
VHiDdwOfking tool* iftcludirq Uff *i unuiuil cjbinel 
meherv r tools, Mundtrds of chlied, gouo^i, rneui 
pUnei fii bfjc« from StwtfpHd. Ceiving tootv chrtti. 
mpMinq iMi'it": rLi!rr% Si lyrLtnuTtahurning looK- 

SALE DATE: |uly 2V, 1994 

for*t"jH <O*0r talaJoq, icid a check lor 11 5. CO 

mad* peyabk (q Peraf r Aiu>cisi«i Aucilont. 

7fl High SlreeL, N«dh»m M^Ari 

Suffolk. If 6 BAW Lnq jrd 

T>h 01t 44 449 712991 * F*»: 01 1 +4 449 ?2J6SJ 




^.JJ, -- 



w- ■- - 



THE BEALL DOWEL MAKER 

a MjLo mkK^hr JCiiuriH dcwelj in un" specks- 
• Can be emily aJjuiicd to nuVc wcnl dowel 

sixi and sirull nu Jdinp. 
a Is JmaNe 4nd FWy Kt u*e^ W itielf nr a* j 
router tabic insen. 

Call or write for information: 

1-800-331-4718 



l * Dept. AW. S41 Swam Rd . NE ^ 
/ Newark, OH 45055 



TOOLS— ANTIQUE ft USED— Stanley. 

Quality selection of scaiee hand tools for col- 
lectors and woodworkers— planes t scrapers, 
spokeshaves. saws, chisels, levels, rules + 
unusual items, etc. COMPLETE, working 
tools. Hundreds of ready to use prc-L9o<) 
tools. Sati-sfaLtion Ciuarantccd. Prompt, post- 
paid service \"ISA/MC^. Current illustrated 
lL%t_53.00. SubsLTiptiort— ■SHMKI/yr, 5 Lists. 
B*ib Kaune. IJept AWVJi 51 I Vt est 1 tth. 
Port Angeles, WA 9H362, (206) -J52-2292, 

Tool Accessories 

ACCU SHARP GRINDING JIG. Now you can 

accurately, safely and quickly sharpen chisels 
and plane irons on your Delta/Reliant or simi- 
lar universal wet/dry grinder. Write for il lus- 
tra led literature: Park wood Products Co., 
Depl. AVt\ Hox *T< Monivale, NJ 07645. 

SWITCH YOtJR IHJST COLLECTOR from 
any location in your shop with a pocket littrt*- 
mJiter. <Jll Femhrook (^04) 524-6125. 

REPIJ^CI: TABLFJiAW GUIDE Fence cheap- 
Super accurate. Easy to mount. 5 year warran- 
ty. (800) 424-9422. 

ROLTER BITS,, S ha per cutters, huge brand 
name selection. FREE next-day delivery. Call 
24 nrs. <«00> CLfT-TRUE. 



DDST COLLECTION for small shops Send 
5.A.S. envelope fs>r description and catalog. F. 
Weiss. Box 5195, Ashland, OR *F520. 



Us* your ow\ tatteww to cut preatiori 

ao^es — bfl f wiy P Kmrate - for bowl C^ 



turning, framing, cuflom prajeas. «c. with M HER SINE 
• FBt-e*nr*te t^*i4frrDrsKijpi wBm hvtitfeapfi'Dtfi tean^e 
lining ■ Ea^-aBcfJ Jht dBrri a^ie finder yd at • hicj^s-vi 
h^fin srowHa' iOt^tt ft -mm yrcfq *mteng tfeftan^ pecs 

Send for free brochure. 
DYNAMIC £NaNE£RlN , G - P.O. 80*14772 • Twion, AI B5732 



Musical Instruments 



GUITAR, BA\|0, MANDOLIN and violin 
building mat trials. Repair tools, replacement 
pans, tone woods and finishing supplies. 
Free 10+pajie catalog. Stewart MacDonald's 
thui;u shop Supply, Box QUOWV. Athens. OH 
4^701.(800)848-2275. 



Help W :t n led 



CARPENTERS — With tools. iransportation H 
references. We have B to 2(i week assign- 
ments in Miami area, Housing plus *9- 
S12/hour. Five years n experience required. 
(800) H4 ^6053, 



Instruction 



lL\ND£-ON WORKSHOPS, Basic and inter 
mediate courses in beautiful Maine. Contact: 
Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, Peter 
Korn, Director, 125 W. Meadow Road, 
Rockland, ME 0184 1 . (207) W4-96 1 1 . 



as 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



SEMINARS/WORKSHOPS. Nationally recog- 
nized instructor*. SASE: Oldc Mill. 1&60 
Camp Kelly, York, PA ]74»2, CTl^TS^-HH^ 

SFU-FLIBUSH HOW-TO Hookleis Put your 
idea:* to work and money in your nidi I dux? 
Free information. Hookhuiisc Publication*. 
P.O. flux 12GA. Mineral Wells, WV 26150, 

UNLOCK THE SECRETS of the Router! With 
Bub and Rick R<»end;i]il s seminars, held 
throughout l lie year. To register call Oak 
Park Enterprise*. <H00) 66V0252, l-jit. -1. 

INCOME FROM YOIJR HOBBY? Profit M*> 
hourly Evcrnhing pre-sM Incredible" $2,011 
for information to Manow, P.O, Box 345, Dcpt. 
A, Ct. St Luc, Montreal, Canada II 4V 2Y& 

Plans/Kite 

TRAIN BED. Build child pleasing locomotive 
bed. Plxrto S3. 00; Complete plans $14.95. GMA 
Designs. 239-E Main St., Ptcasanton, CA 94566. 

ADVANCED SCROLL SAW PATTERNS— 

$1 00 for 11 roc hurt B7 Nelson Designs. P.O. 
IJox 422. lJublin. NH 03444. 



: 



x 



x 



Furniture Plans 

Five Easy To Build Shaker Si vie Pieces 

Sailed Uriurrtfv. Mjitnal Li*l & IrMniilnnn 
*r\tt\nr*D r> w * Build "n»* f«ncnil Adjpurioni 

IVVCKLabmct bt w f i)fd fw «hc 5iuti shup 
Wriiine Desk bjml- T<mi> i Materias 

Blanket Chest ^^ * w 

C"flfee Table , TN Add „ . LVl Tjl( 



Arrowood Design Co. -De pi. AW 

I'D. Hm ftflNM Krankhn. TN _1?WiMN6lt 



: 



iUCKBOARD BENCH KIT 

l Real Springs) 

KJE includes: 

authentically 
designed Meel 

springs that give 
> lit it, sted arm* 

& backrat Is, com- 
plete hardware f# 

detailed I win** 

Hon. $49.00 

iVt»,MCMcef«edl WW*** 

Price includes shipping 4 UPS). We also dfer 
pre^cut 6 drilled oak fw an additional $40 00. 

THE ROUDEBUSH CO, 
Box J 48W. Star Ci t y. I N 4o9S5 

1-800-847-4947 




7^ Y HE ASl EfllCAN QjASTER ^ 



P*n 



7TM Lifcr fl«d Aipt A W* fttonfrH* Ml 4KJr 

■ 5 »"MM111 INK.* IPtl 1 B " 2*; 

■ Mzray tack }jjutii 
* A! E*G»S TCliAM S4H 

Jl 2 95-1 




IWDGkflSpHV^HlKt 

Wm*w# Farm Wiqvi 

S Uwvta •■en ill NIO 3 

529 95 \» 



**■ 



*- 



«, 




I - D J Vela Wwi Uf-BM 
SMrflWlHtl S3iK 



*J -cm. cat bt osnt m a 

BRCKHLRE IT 00 



THE ROCKING WHALE. Unique design, fun 
for kids. Full scale plans SI 2.95. Mar Y 
Mundo Woodworks, 143CJ Willamette *tiU3, 
Eugene. OR 9^-iOI - 

GIFT PLANS — Minimum time, materials. 
Maximum enjoyment „ compliments, s 
Flans— 5^ SO + SJ .50 S&H. Check/ MO. 
Geppctto's. 112 Audrey St. H RR1J. Thunder 
Bay, Ontario, Canada P"B ^E4, 

ALL NEW SCROLL SAW Patterns. Sports, 
animal*, etc. Lixamples: $2.0(1. Scrullaaw 
Graphic*. 1*0. box L5 l >«, Dept. AW*03, 
Kennesaw, GA 30144, 

SUPER WOODCRAFT PATTERNS, 

Windmills, wells, vanes, birdhouscs, 
whirli^i^. jij^awirif!, dozens itmrc. Caulog 
SI.OCL Woodcnifter'N Delight. P.O. \Un 56H, 
Carson Cit), MUHHU. 



Turned Wood Kits 



P| ' GccJe'i . Sle ni i. Vore " 

I / Turrwd of WBicC\ krowDodi 

Wiplr C4u3« fTMdirHfci. Kt 3 Bfti 17, N«**lk. Wl Sl*4» 
fff frocftse Col 1 -I0&4&1 -Wf, Fc» (fiCi} »4^M 



Reconstruct Aiittrica^ Past 

N**,N*ttt fit/err ftibhfaii t**iMH**}a**4* 

Flam ForFjsrivAirtfritait 
Country tanaluiw. 

^ kra>Mn*Ja-Mi|ii=hD*ln.H-ul!h: 

trd^LK crs3n>L 

4202 KmtmtHmStA m .Suaw6. tk J AmmM t MD2l229 





li'i. Ejtsn Jt'i Humfota s Jt*l Satrijutki*. 
Yotl C«a M*kt t[ Or Your Mone> Back . 

The all Hew fbK m**hi<h CU* *kh sJwJf 
fpr hook* and nufuinrv 111,95 A. ii Sdtll 
nyii^wMfj: ^Hii fJ»fii on wh«Ji plai 
« Sittxkm. Pl*a Cuw P.0.8. 290 
lb OakJial Mfene 0i%l 
^^ Maifi«rt«iitaiitaddei4-4SIJD 



Full 

Size 
Plan 



l-N»>4/2-Q4til9 Vt juWC/A>i£i OTtfjWvf 




WOODWORKING PLAMSg 
PATTERNS J BOOKS 



190 EAST WOOD PROJECTS 

• 102 BIRD HOUSES 1 FEEDER PLANS 

• 110 FULL SIZE PLYWOOD PATTERNS 
$. K EACH * &,S0 PAH / 9D B£S AX 5» TAX 
CATALM 13.00 * FREE W/OftoEfi USA/MC/CrECK 

GREAT! VECR AFT PLANS 1-B0O-753-3W5 

«54 CEDAR COVE LANE iSOIAMAPaiS. IN 4(250 




MAKE WOODEN TOYS' 

1» V ? . i p I ! ,j s ia -_ " T\ h ,p TTjfjvi 1 ILiilLk 1 

IXilllvHisiM.'' DOECM i«f fun W*wJi*ri 
! projiKt •> J'lOTi our 9 as jr in unr putt, p" an* 
irJ K:1h AIL aiktU leteb. CAMlogfl.GQ- 

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NOW YOU CAN BUY OR SOI 

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begin finding the best 

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(Turn to page 21 for mote details,} 



r 



4MERICAN WOODWORKER A 1UNE 1994 83 



tool em 




Height Gauge 

With the Angle V\ right 
Height Gauge, win 
can make precise 
height adjustments 
with case on 
routers, shapes 
jointers, table- 
saws and 
radial arm 
saws. The 
tool's steel 
pointer 
moves over 

a 3!i-in. measuring range, and you can 
fine-tune i he height setting over a % 
in. range by Just m ruing a micro- 
adjusting knob. 

This brass and anodt/cd-aluminum 
gauge is available with either a deci- 
mal scale (readable to I MM) 1 in, with a 
built-in vernier) or a fractional scale 
with ] /ib-in, graduations. (Price: $1 19) 
AngleWrigbt Tout Co. t Dept AWT, 
Box 20632, Los Angeles, CA 90025* 
(3W) 471-7432. Circle #667 

Variable-Speed 
Benchtop Jointer 

Delta's new Model 37-070 Bench 
Jointer offers many features found on 
full-sized jointers, at a more affordable 
price. And its compact size makes it 
easy to transport or store when not in 
use. The 30-in_-long aluminum table 
accommodates stock up to 6 in. wide, 
and the cutrcrhcad holds two high- 
speed-steel knives that can be 
resharpened, The machine's 4 l Mn.- 
high fence gives more support for 
edge jointing than shorter fences on 
some other benchtop jointers, and 




you can tik the fence up to 45° for 
beveling- Model 37-070 comes with a 
10-amp variable-speed motor, so you 
adjust cutting speed to suit your mate- 
rial and feed rate. (Price: S330 list) 
Delta international Machinery €o. } 
Dept, AWT f 246 Alpha Dr., 
Pittsburgh, PA 1523$, (800) 438- 
2486. Circle #668 

Instant Bandsaw Blades 

The Blade Brazer bandsaw blade 
repair kit lets you fix broken blades or 
save money on new blades by making 
vour own from bulk stock. Blade 

■ 

Brazer will handle steel or bimetal 
blades from '/t6 in. to Va in. wide, and 
the kit includes a fixture to hold the 
blade, enough high-strength silver 
brazing alloy for dozens of joints, braz- 
ing flux and step-by-step instructions. 
All you need to supply is a propane 
torch, a vise and a grinding wheel or 
file. (Price: S 29.95) 




Wood Systems Inc., Dept AWT, Box 

51744, New Berlin, WJ 53151-0744, 
(800) 321-0834. Circle #669 

Super- Flat Lapping Plates 

The Harris Lapping System combines 
a dead-flat sharpening surface (within 
0-0002 in.) with the precision of pre- 
mium abrasive materials. And unlike 
oil or water stones that start to wear 
as soon as you put a chisel or plane 
iron to them, the lapping plates will 
stay absolutely flat for a lifetime, 
claims the manufacturer, 

The system consists of two lapping 
plates, an aluminum tray to hold the 
plates, Lapping oil, containers of 280- 
grit and 600>grit silicon carbide grains, 
and tubes of 10-micron and 3-micron 
diamond paste, equivalent to 1,200- 




grit and 6 t 000-grit water stones. 

You begin sharpening with a fast- 
cutting mixture of silicon carbide 
grains and oil on the lapping plate 
with gridded grooves, Then, for surgi- 
cally sharp edges, use the diamond 
paste on the smooth lapping plate. 
Both the silicon-carbide and diamond 
abrasives imbed themselves in the 
tapping plates, so you only occasion- 
ally add minute amounts of the abra- 
sives to maintain cutting action, 
(Price: $192.50) 
Garrett Wade, Dept AWT. 161 At& of 
the Americas, New York, NY 10013, 
(800) 221-2942, Circle #670 



3£ 






IN THE WORKS 



New Tool From Makita 

MakiU is set to introduce a new 
Wood Surfacer that machines 
wood glass-smooth. This unique 
machine dt>cs the same job as a 
stationary planer, but it shears 
off paper-thin slivers of wood 
with ;t single stationary knife 
instead of a rotating euttcrhcad. 
The machine feeds the stock 
under the blade with a fast slic- 
ing nun ion, We were impressed 
with the cuts the W<xxl Surfacer 
produced— it lets you bypass 
sandpaper altogether. 

It handles stock up to 6N2 in. 
thick, " hi in. wide, and ~K\ in, 
long. You can rotate the blade 
for skewed cuts, just as you 
would a hand plane. Look for 
the Wood Surfacer in l.S. wood- 
working stores and mailorder 
catalogs by early summer. 



64 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUN E 1994 



EXOTIC & DOMESTIC 
OVER 75 SPECIES 

LUMBbH - VENEfcN - TURNING STOCK 



COLLECTORS SAMPLE KIT 

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30 GORGEOUS WOODS 

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$51. 




Together w/Book of Fine Hardwoods 

Over 70 woods shown m lull color Chans 

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WOODWORKERS *~a. 



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Free Catalog 

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lx>cal 4QI-423-2520 Local 803-846-9500 
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CIRCLE HD 1 7 ON FHQDUCT ISFDHMXTION FORM 



• ••••|lodfll# 350-1 
GENERAL 10* TABLE SAW with 
BIESEMEYER 50" T -SQUARE 

COMMERCIAL SAW FENCE SYSTEM 

Uttrq Gauge ' 3 HP malar * Mtgnitic i^vlw ■ Motax cowr 
with 4' Dual CcllKlcr COnnedian* Ah k\it*t Hi ftftCpllMl. 
aUTSTAWthG VALUE? YOUR PRICE ONI* 







$1,495.00 



* DNL TABLE SAW BLADES 

B lt f now and g« a pack of 3 assorted 
□ ML quality blade*: Hip, fraittut and 
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A S2OT.MI valut 
only Si 49.00 



TO ORDER CALL TOLL FREE: 1-800-235-2100 



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Charga It to your credit card account 

jito ortoti ijc<cr T) [rung* frt+aji noaoa 

Shcfwt^oa »iw p* 

WILKE Machinery Company 

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For Technical Service Call: 1717-764 5000 

VISIT OUfi SPACIOUS SHOWROOM ■ tQ.Q0Qsq.ti Motm than A» maenmes on dsptsy 
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SEND FOR CATALOGS: O/idar rrutrtirwy jr>d «c«s&n« far pfotestknat quality woorfiw* 
from a ur two. raw ticrting caWo$& Send JZW to ™ceJvo both tatalogs. 

Cn&.£ "VQ 307 C*J PRODUCT tlFQFUJATlCH TCfU 

AMERICAN WOODWORKER * JUNE 1Q1*4 




OS 




Jig&awing In a Jiffy 

AEG's new F1XTEC orbital-action jig- 
saw offers more* features than any jig- 
saw we + ve seen. To change blades* 
you just flip a lever, locking the 
Bosch-type blade in place. 

For easier plunge and corner cuts, 
you can move the saw's shoe forward 
or backward, or, tilt the shoe for angle 
cuts. A unique ceramic guide assembly 



helps stabilize the blade, The saws 
5,7-amp motor is the most powerful in 
the retail market and includes elec- 
tronic speed control. A non marring 
plastic shoe cover and an anti-splinter 
ing insert are standard. (Price: $299) 
Chicago Pneumatic, Electric Tools 
Division, DepL A \XT, 2220 Bteecker 
SL, Vtica, NY IJ501. (HfH)) 243-OHJO. 
Circle #671 




CFW Tilting Router Table 



TESTED BY PATRICK SPIELMAN 



With its new tilting 
router table, CFW is 
continuing a tradition of 
developing innovative products for 
woodworkers. The table lets you tilt a 
router and hit (like a tilting-arbnr 
shaper), so you can rout profiles and 
make cuts that vou otherwise couldn't 
do without special (igs. 

The keys to this versatility lie in the 
hinged tabic and the sliding mount for 
the router. The hinged rear section of 
the table will tilt and lock ji *m> arifcle 
from 0* to 90'. when the tilting rear 
table is horizontal {Q*\ the router bit 
sticks straight up P just as on an ordi- 
nary router table. When the rear table 
is tilted to vertical (90°), the bit pre- 
fects horizontally as it would on a slot- 
mortising machine, Or you can set the 
tahle at any an^le in between, opening 
up almost unlimited possibilities for 
cuts such as picture-frame moldings. 

The sliding mount for the router 
runs on a lead screw, letting you pre- 
cisely move the bit back and forth 
when the table is horizontal, or move 
the bit up and down when the table is 
tilled. 

I found the unit required minimal 
setup time, and it was well built and 
surprisingly solid, though it weighed 
just 28 pounds. Tile table consists of l A- 
in.-thick phenolic plastic laminated to 
Vin. medium- density fiberboard. The 
top surface is smooth and strong, but 
since there is no laminate on the 
underside of the MDF. the table could 
warp Willi changes in moisture. In fact, 
I noticed a slight dip in the top surface 
near the bit opening. The table has a 




mitcr-^iugc hlot in the top (not shown 
in photo). 

The manufacturer recommends you 
install a I Vi- to 241 P fixed-base router* 
with a base no more than 6% in. in dia. 
Most plunge routers wont fit in the ?V 
in. -high space under the table, though 
you could mount one if you blocked 
the unit up for more clearance. 

Unlike on other router tables, the 
two-piece aluminum fence on this unit 
cannot be adjusted fore-and-aft. 
(Instead, you use the sliding router 
mount to move the router and bit.) 
However, you can adjust the fence 
opening from 1 in, to V: in, wide to 
accommodate different bits, and you 
can offset the fences ' w> in. for jointing 
work. I discovered that fence alignment 
became difficult after sawdust worked 
its way into die table recess where the 
fence is attached, (I had to use a blast 
of compressed air to clean out the 
recess.) Another problem was that the 
aluminum fence made black marks on 
my workpieces, especially after multi- 
ple passes. 



With the router in the horizontal 

position {and the table vertical at 90 D ) I 
found I could rout rabbets, dadi>cs and 
tonguc-and-groove joints, and even 
make tenons up to about 2 in. long and 
mortises 2 in, deep, I also routed raised 
panels using a vertical-style panel- rais- 
ing bit with die workpiece flat on the 
table. 

With the table tilted, 1 was able to 
rout onc-of-a kind moldings or edge 
profiles. It's also easy to repeat settings 
if you want to reproduce a custom 
molding or joint later. Simply record 
the bit depth, sliding router mount 
position (shown on a calibrated scale) 
and table angle for reference. 

On the downside, I found it difficult 
to clamp stops, hold-downs or feather 
boards to the tilting table section, 
though I could clamp them to the 
front, stationary table. With the table 
tilted vertically, the combination Lexan 
guard and dust-collection box limits the 
height of stock you can work. Also, 
when using the unit like an ordinary 
router table, you can't move the bit any 
more than about 2 in. from the fence. 
This could limit access to the bit for 
freehand routing with pilot-bearing 
bits. 

As a standard flat router table or a 
joint-making machine alone, the CFW 
machine is adequate but unexception- 
al. Bui when you add the versatility 
afforded by the tilting table, there's 
nothing around to beat it. (Price: $ 

399.95) 

CFW, Dept AWT t Box 85565, Tucson, 
AZ 85745-5565, (602) 62J-4065. 
Circle #672 



80 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A J u \ E 1994 




A COMl'LETE AND 

UNIQUE RANGE OF Tlffi FINEST 

HARJ1WARE 




trghsh Hand. Euignl Iron K/wto 



box i to, j*sq* h*v ;*, *ilson, vh ao» ra. an ?jw *m 
CAU- or wsnr. ram our a* moi cat $2.» 

CFO.E HO 205 Oi fHODUCT PTOflMUTICN FDRW 



. 




WOODWORKER'S 
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Over 4000 products to 

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For your 2-year subscription send $1 DC to: 

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CMT's new 8-piece 

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M ore's a super pace on the mo^t vcrsdlite 
R<*boo<«r>g >W On Ih* market You'll gel 
an 1-3,'S'diameler ftabbarma. Bll r fi lop- 
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most uselul rabbets. 

800 -ft 22 1,4" 5 hank 



List: jV39,St> 

SALE; $32.90 

172" Shank 
Ll*t: $£€.5U 

S41£; $35.90 

Baketf-gn Ttfon Hl 
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-Micrc^riin carbide t«dy».«s. 
Fjmgue-Ftotfft steel 
shanks tnd (MMll^* 
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i*7 ?H"FRftMfftS£Aff i5fiA.ll 1 , lflJSLBS lffl 

2H 3' iai J afLI5**iDEniWDUS J TB*G__. 15* 

1JS3V5 a , I3rV5BELTSJWPHWll)USTBAiC..1» 

Wfl ^X^gGLl^JWUEnilVDOSTBtG t96 

3*1 T 1 2r BELT S^DEH .._.„„.„ __ m 

itJ i K 31" BELT S WIDER 1^ DUST B*C ..-,-, i» 

i'lU* Ult SANDER __ ltf 

4*1 1 1 J I IIU1E&S SAWW BRAKE, IS AMP 1H 

1 3 SHT RN SANDIfl 

i wfw>HicjtfrcijrTfii„ 

Stt BISC JOINER W CASE A TILT FENCE 

WC nSHPflOulERWTVAlirCQUETS ON 

SKffl MjHf TOUTER fr CASE Ul 

&3l T 13 HP "D'HANOLf ROWTEfl ..,_,,(« 

bS PIUHG& BASE RCKPTf R. HI 2 HP .„ Iffi 

as SHUF-ERtABLEW 1 ? 2HPBDUTER._....J1J 

6» SHAPEHTASlE ™.^- BB1 « w ™ 

ftHI 39 VSftORlLLHaOORPMWCHR 

siti 0UHIJLG 

6*15 lS'VSflOflJLL.iSAW* 1 *ETLS5CK, 

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7HSJ p JLHREl. GR! P SAVONET SAW _„ 

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9775,1 l Z' VS, J SPO MAllUf R O&LL KIT .. 1« 



n-5*B irBETICH TOP PLACER _. T ,_„ 

31-140 4~ BELT «- OtSC SAMKR... 

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case ...v avjai is-^chollsjuk, js**eo 

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A5E . . 1M sftT7S WIIMOCKSTAKd PSTBL »OHK STAND 



fJldimufat; 



K-1 SAME AS ABOVE BUT t? TOtf , 

Q* 7 1 f DRCULAfl SAW, 13 AWP ._ 

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ffiff V*H SFElj SAW7ALL W BLADES L CSE .... U3 

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t*TAC« NAILS _ 2rt 



INTERNATIONAL TOOL CORPORATION 

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Or\ r^OST U»S ORKfrS OVEft &0 00 UN MJU F\JflCtlAS| WTTHlN THE COTtlKF NT AJL U S A 

®1 -800-338-3384 

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137JD 3~X JIT DUCTLESS BELT SANK H "^ 

12J3D 4 J 24" DUST LESS BELTS AWE R IH» 

1273D\'S VS CS1LS BLT SNDR IV ED BELTS 23 

1 JTOMvti C " VS OST L S RNOS Oflfl SNOR KIT TS 

1 W4V5 CtlC 8ARRL MND1 J« SAW, VS W CS W 

1»?VS TJCP'H * JiDLE J iG SAW, VS W CASE rtt 

1«U :J4HPiq3UTERWITHr--lfFCA5E ,UT 

i«M lAM.SATI IRHKfl ■*■ 

1«9KI BElUStE INSTALIERSIUIW 4 BASES .23 

16I3EW ?HPVARSPPLNGRTIfVTEDGFCOE Tffi 

l«-4EVS U 4 HP VAfl SP PLUNCE ROUTER H 

lilSE^S 3 14 HP VAR SP PLUNGE ROUTER .3fe» 

1(66 7 14- CIRCULAR SAW " : ' ' \ ff* 

ItfiaVSRK St V. VSR CH0LS DRILL \t 1 BAT. CS _. Ltt 

32a?D\'S S"VS DySTLESS RANOCM ORBIT % 




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LUMKJIO triOT MB eCMBO BLADE ,..—. 
I UjE»9ia Iff 1 » T. A Tfl FOR FJEJiSOH RN 6M! 

LLBISBlO ICT X Mt RIP BLADE TH4N KERE — ._ 

;;aau:iO iO"X«TCflOS5CUMHJNtCERF . 4i 

LUS-AtlG 10' XWTTCH BEST rcSLAWN*TES » 

LUXltelD I^XST TO* LAMINATES OR WOOO ..... & 

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TKJ.S 15" XWT THIN KERF FIN 5HWG ... 
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tfClLLAT'JSG TRIANGULAR SAM Eft $^89 
hCL U DES CASE A P APE R A&SQRTUENT 



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AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 19^4 67 





Advertisers' Product 



ABRASIVES 

Pagi: ECON AHKAS|\ FSl V-'eCUStom- 

1 1 make abrasive belts up (o 52" w We ill 
Circle any grit Our new catalog corrtiina hun- 
38 drain of abrasives, plus safely equip- 
ment, VeJcro-bacJced discs, clamps, 
glue, drawer slides, hinges. 

Pfcge KL1NGSPOR ABRASIVES; Klinfr 
25 spor's Sanding Catalogue: Quality 
Circle sanding and finishing products for the 
71 professional or nobbiest. Free *5 gi ft 
certificate in each catalogue- 
Page PERFORM AX: Get to the finish line 
78 faster with a Pertbrmax drum sander. 
Circle Poht spend hours with a hund-held 
1 03 belt sander, Sand ultra-w ide stoc k 
ult ra smooth in just ml rtutes Models 
start at 1300 to 13,495. Ji .00. 

Page SAND-MTE MANUFACTURING 

22 CO. : Eliminate tedious hand-sand i ng 
Circle in contoured parts without loss of 
29 shape or detail. Excellent for rie burr- 
ing, sanding and final finishing, 

ACCESSORIES 

Page AARDVARK TOOL COMPANY; 

78 SawlYax — full line erf Industrial saw 
Circ le and router trac ki ng systems- 2.1" & 
6 35"* crosscui fully assembled henchtop 
model; &T & 65" crosscut panel kit 
model, 

Page A IRSTRE AM IHBT HELMETS; 

1 5 Powered air respiratory excellent far 
Circle all jobs which create dust. Eye pr#- 
78 tectkm. Can be worn w ith beard or 
glasses. Systems also available for 
paint and lacquer funn_-s- fiOO-3284792. 

Page CARTERPR£)OllCTS:Bandsaw 

] 9 guides and guide mounti n# adapters 
Circle and part* for most handsaws hi" ami 
34 larger. 30' and 36" bandsa w wl^els, 1 u" 
to 42" handsaw I ires, Laser A quartz 
line Lights inspection lights. 

Page DOYEL ENTERPRISES: Fence Sys~ 

13 terns for txjth table saws and radial 
Circle arm saws. Features rufWi^i aluminum 

I construction and angle cutting accura- 
cies of less than '/**, 

Page EXCALint'R MACHINE &TOUL: 

77 Update your table saw. Exeallbur 
Circle T-Slot Saw Fence locks cja front and 

49 rear guide rails, stays parallel to blade. 
Companion sliding talJe handles slock 
up to 60" wide, Lifetime guarantee. 

Page JDS : Precision woodworking equip- 

II meni for the home or professional 
Circle shop. The incredibly precise Accu* 

85 Miter is a must for every table saw. The 
versatile Multi-Router makes mortise 
and tenon work a snap. 




ERVICES 




Dear fellow woodworker. 



To help you better understand the 
full scope of products and services 
advertised in litis issue. American 
IVbodirorfcer hits compiled a brief 
description of many of its advertisers. 
We've arranged the companies by 
product category to help you locate 
the informalion or products you need. 
They are also listed alphabetically in 
our "Advertisers' Index." 

To order valuable Informalion. simply 
complete and return the attached form. 
Well process your request promptly 
and the companies will mail the infor- 
mation directly to you. 



Page KELLER DOVETAIL SYSTEM: 

19 You can cut tteautiful dovetails eas tly, 
Circle accurately and quickly. No test cuts; 

77 unlimited width; warranted accurate 
20 years, Full information: $L New 
video: S8.95 ( 4- $2 p/h), 800-995-2456. 

Page LEIGH INDUSTRIES: Leigh Dove* 
5 tailJigN Multiple Mortise Tenon JigM p 
Circle Universal Guide Rush syisum n> fit \ ir- 
46 tualty all pin nge n hi ters. Tlie itKKtt vcr- 
sat lie and comprehensive duveiailing 
system. Free catalog, 800-663-8932. 

Page ONEIDA AIR SYSTEMS: Special- 
21 izes in smal I i industrial quality wood 
Circle dual collection systems. We sell cy- 
sh clones, fi If ermed La, fans and other re- 
lated products, Low cost, high quality, 

Pa#? ROLL-TOP-COV ER: An attract Ive 
4 and practical way to cover your truck 
Circle bud and provide key locked, water 
73 tight sea i rlty for tools, Free Brochure: 
800-338^97. 

Page VEGA ENTERPRISES: Manufae- 
18 tureis of high<iuality woodworking 
Circle machinery and accessories. Call for 
8 free i rdbrmat km &HJ-222-VEGA. Made 
in USA- Videos available. 

Page WAGNER ELECTRONIC PROD- 
27 UCTS: Hand-held moisture meters 
Circle H en4 wood abuse"'! Low -cost* accurate 
14 "wood friendly" solutions to "old-fash- 
ioned pin-tort ure^ type meters. Deep 
penetrating, pin- Inn; moisture measure 
menL 8*X>-m-707& 



BITS, BLADES* CUTTERS 

Page AMANA TOOL CORRi Solely d«li- 
t »j> 1 cated to pruv kdlng the fi nest quality cut- 
Circle ting tools in the world: carbkle-lipped 
44,51 router bits, saw blades, dado sets, ro- 
sette cutters, hunng bits, simper cut- 
ters, and planer knives. 



P*ge CASCADE TOOLS: New 1990 caia- 
86 log is packed full of af fordabty priced 

Circle j ndustrial grade SY brand router bits 
1 7 and shaper cutters. Also see many new 
hard-lo-tlnd woodworking accessories, 

Pa^ CMT TOOLS: Send for CMTsfull- 
B7 coLor, l i2^age router bit catalog and 
Circle we'll give you a $F> discount on your 
59 first order! C MT bits feature anti-kick* 
back design. Teflon t-oatingsand micro- 
gram carbide cutting edtfes 

P*»e CRAFTSMAN INDUSTRIAL: Send 

3 for our free catalog — the highest qual- 
Circle ity router bits and accessories* preci- 
42 sion forged in the USA, with vV and 
V-T shanks, CTuararut^i io perform to 
your satisfaction! 

Pa#- fc FREEUOUNTOOL:ManufacLurerof 
8 shaper cutters tipped in either carbide 
Circle or tantung. Catalog offers full line of 
W cutters for immediate delivery. Special- 
izes in fast delivery of custom cutters 

Page FORREST MFC: Get ready-to-glue 

75 Joints, rip or crosscut right off your ta- 
Cintle htesaw with nur W™>d worker 11 ^ade. 
74 No rtiore twit torn riplinteri ng h wratchy 

saw cuts or blade changing. $109, 
fiOO.73a.7in; in NJ 201473-5236. 

Page MLC3: New 32-page catalog features 
(5*22 hundreds of h igh-qnality carbide- 
Circle tipped router bits, shaper cutters, solid 
53, Si f arbide bits, professional woodwork ■ 
Ing products. Prompt service guarnu 
toad 

Pajje SUFFOLK MACHINERY: Tt^ 1h-si 
2 1 p 1 7 bandsaw hlade jiMi'll ever use — S wed- 
Circle ish silicon-steel bandsaw blades for 
37 every purpose. Ultra-smooth cut, thin 
kerf, fast chip removal, any length. 



BOOKS/VIDEOS 

Page MANNY'S: Our 64-page color catalog 

IS has the must complete scicction of 
Circle woodworking hooks and videos any- 
201 where^ We alw carry Freud sawlilades 
and router bits, Freeborn sliafier cut- 
ters and fine Englisli hand tools. 



CARVING SUPPLIES 

P^gP SUG I NO : Pmfessinnal quality, cfec- 
1 1> trie carving tool chisels wood up to 
Circle irj.000 vpm . Siifr, eaHym-use Pres- 
95 sure-act t va t w I lK m ad cortrjaii carving 
s-pewi ami [k-puY Carves faster than 
a mallet and chisel. 



sa 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 193 4 









CLAMPS 



Fagf 1 MAFLETEK ENGINEERING. 

4 INC.; introducing Lever-clump, the 
Circle ultimate toggle clamp, (Damps in- 
19 stantly, mounts with a single bolt to 
jig, drill press or workbench. Call 
800-4-C LAMPS. 

Page MERCURY VACUUM I'KESSES: 

I Manuf act u rers of h igh-quali ty vacuu m 
Circle v^nceririfiaridlamijiatiii(tcqiiipiTW>nl 
110 and accessories, ('all for free informs, 
tion acM)-£KJfV4o(lfi. Made in U.S.A. 

Page VACUUM PRESSING SYSTEMS: 

4 The leader in vacuum tec hnology for 
Circle woodworking offers a complete line of 
S9 1 nnovative products. Systems perform 
full range of veneering, laminating or 
clamping task*. 



FINISHING SUPPLIES 

Page CLAniAM'S BEESWAX PROD- 

1 1 UCTS, LTD.: Unier your beeswax pol- 
Clrcle Uli ajwd ask about our Beeswax Salad 
1 12 Bowl Finish. Price include!) shipping 
and handling. Prompt, personal ser- 
vice. Mini-brochure free. 

Page J.A. HARCHUCK SALES: Discow 
77 the flexibility and versatility of Croix 

Circle sprayers. Choose from i) Una and 16 air 
20 caps for your need, Authorised factory 
service, parts In stock, 



GENERAL WOODWORKING 
CATALOGS 

Page CGNSTANTINE*S: Over 4,000 
87 woods, veneers, inlays, carvings, mold- 
Circle ings, hardware, finishing supplies, 
104 books, pians... All backed by 160 years 
of experience and 60-day no-quesrlons- 
asked guarantee. 3-year sub SL00, 

Page GARRETT WADE: Our 1004 catalog 
1? has 224 full-color pages of the very 

Circle best tools, books, finishing supplies 
70 and shop accessories, Many tips and 
much information. 

Cover GRIZZLY IMPORTS: Fr*e 1994 cat- 

2 alog is bigger and better than ever! 
Page Many new items along with our large 
27 selection of af ftwdably priced wood- 
Circle working machines! toota & accesso- 
43 ries. 

Page HIGHLAND HARDWARE: Free tool 

1 1 catalog offers 130 pages of the finest 
Circle hand and power tools* books and sup- 
36 plies, In-depth product descriptions 
and extra how-to information 

Page McFEELY 'S: New eotar catalog fea- 
27 tuies over 304 varieties of the jncredi- 

Circle ble square-drive screw. We also carry 
9 woodworking books t clamps, carbide- 
tipped router bits and sawbl&des, and 
more. 



page WrJOttCRAFT SUPPLY: <*w 4,000 

91 quality tools, books, supples, liaid- 
Clrcle ware in our 140-page catalog. "Mi-free 
28 technical assistance mxierl ng and 
customer service. 8(KM>l2-fJl 1FL 
Dept,#94WA05T, 

Page WOODWORKERS STORE: New 
22 1 993^4 catalog with over 300 new 
Circle items: domestic and exotic ban J woods, 
39 vtcneerSr wood parts, hard ware , Kitchen 
accessories, fin idling supplies; many 
exclusive* harbVto-flnd specialties. 
Catalog $2, 

HAND TOOLS 

Page THE FINE TOOL JOURNAL: The 

78 magazj ne Cor lovers of hand tools, coh 
Circle lectors or craftsmen. Ankles, l*ook 
33 reviews, aii^entee tool auctions and 
more. Free brochure. 

Page HARRIS TOOLS: Fine handmade 
27 tooK High -quality, Li fetime guarantee. 
Circle Tools are refined interpretations of 
109 classic designs with lechnologjcal im- 
provements for the modern craftsman, 

Page LIE-S1ELSON TOOLWORKS: 

7B Makers of Iw? i rloom quality hand tools. 
Circle Free brochure of grow ingcouteetion 
18 of handmade bn*i«e plants and oilier 
tools. Call: 800-327-2520. 



HARDWARE 

Page HALL £ BALL: Since 1B32 the leader 
1 H in the finest quality reproduction fu mi- 

Circle tune, cabinet! and housclxtJd hartlware- 
16 Over 1,600 items. 106-page catalogs 
*5.00l Mlntcaialog free. 

Page BRUSS FASTENERS: We offer a 
21 free catalog of aJL types of wood raa- 

C irele tetters, including a large selection of 
61 square-drive, itnc-plated Industrial 
screws. 

Page HORTON BRASSES: These fine 

77 brasses, made in Connecticut will en» 
Circle nance the beauty of your work. From 
401 pul Is and knobs to hi nges and casters, 
we offer a wide, quality selection. A 
bihle for the furniture maker, $4.00. 

Page JAMESTOWN DISTRIBUTORS: 
36 Free catalog for building, restoring or 
Circle repairing. Filled with cxHroslonrre- 
15 sistant fasteners, indoor uutdour fin- 
ishes, glues, hardware, abrasives, tools- 
Page WAYNE'S WOODS HARDWARE: 

1G Tum-of-the century reproduction hard- 
Circle ware including stamped and cast brass 
65 pulls, knobs, keyhole covers. Also por- 
celain and wooden knobs in oak, wal- 
nut, cherry, maple. 

Page WHITE CHAPEL BRASSES: WCB 

87 Is quickly becoming the preferred 
Circle source for a wide range of the finest 
205 authentic and special purpose hard- 
ware. We guarantee the best prices 
and reliable, helpful service. 



KITS AND PLANS 



**= ADAMS WOOD PRODUCTS: Manu- 

W failures wood fu rnit ure parts. Free cat- 
L l rele alog illustrates and prices i ndividual 
■* parts and re«Sy-to-a5HemUc kits Ibr 
chair* and tables. No minimum quan- 
tity Will make to customer spec* 

P*# DESIGNER FURNITURE PLANS: 

Build classic furniture from our f ul 1- 
Circle j^ plans. 50 best-selling items, includ- 
3K ing Computer Desk. Cradle, SewLng 
Center and many more. Order our Cat- 
alog $3.00. 



P^ FURNITURE DESIGNS: Order wjut 
21 full-size plans from our catalog —200 

^ l ™ e designs to choose from! Plans include 
303 Early American, English Chippendale, 
Queen Anne, Shaker, Spanish $3.00. 



Page MODEL EXPO, INC.: For the idtl^ 
* ' male in museum quality replicas you 
Circle can build yourself. Pre-cut wooden 
105 parts, metal and brass fittings, cloth 
sails. Send SI for catalog. 

P&«e SPECIALTY FURNITURE DE- 

9 SIGNS: Our color catalog offers profes- 
Ci re le s jon a [ plans, Full-size templates, i nstruc- 
tkms and materials list for complicated 
designs. Calais *2.0O. 



204 



Pafi« WOODEN MEMORIES: Fult*cale 
1 v. : : :*cd work i n e, plans of rocjq ng ani- 
Ci r cle rnals, chi ldren s turn iture, doll f u rni- 
1 W ture, Christmas displays, lawn displays 
i " i ■■> other toys & accessories. Catalog 

ii.oa 



LUMBER 

Page CBI LUMBER INTT,: Buy from a 
B7 liicct importer and save! save! s»e! 

Circle F1 nest quality exotk woods— Lumber 
27 turning squares and cants. Custom 
sawing available. Free brochure. 

Page MX- CONDON CO,: Find everything 

17 ^Tteed— impcrted/oomestic hard- 
Circle woods, softwoods, plywood, stock and 
203 custom moldings, flooring, arch Iteo 
tural moldings and millwork, Available 
for immediate shipping nationwide. 
32-page catalog. 

Page NYLE: Save moneyfMake money!... 

11 by kiln drying for others. As the na- 
Clrcle tion'd largest manufacturer of dehu- 
58 nddiflcatkm dry kilns, we supply the 
same type of equipment used by major 
firms. 



Pag* STEVE WALL LUMBER: Quality 

13 hardwoods and machinery for the 
Circle craftsman and educational institutes. 
108 Our catalog lists over 30 domestic and 
exotic woods plus plywood. We ship 
worldwide. SI. 00. 



I 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE: 1994 




Advertisers' Products/Services Directory 



Page WOODWORKERS SOURCE: (h-er 
SG 75 exotic and <fc»mesiic woods— turn- 
Circle ber f plywood, turning squares, bowl 
7 blanks and veneers. Custom cutting 
and thin stock. Quantity discounts. 



POWER TOOLS 

Cow BOSCH POWER TOOLS: Prtctoton. 

3 crafted, portahte power tools and ac- 
CircJe ce«sorie^fi>rprofe*s}onal and serious 
25 amateur woodworkers. 

Page DELTA: Complete Urie of quality 

7,9, 1 1 woodwork! ng, machinery and accesso 

Clrcle rlw Ibr industo^'w*^^^^ 
55 schools and home workshops. Innova- 
tive, reliable tools at affordable prices, 
800^38-2486. 

Page ENLON IMPORT CORP.: The best 
23 deals for )x*ir woodworking needs, A 
Circle large of fine woodworking machinery, 
32 tools, and accessories far your home 
and business workshop, Free catalog: 
S00-B8B-96&?* 

Page EXCALIBUR MACHINE CORP.: 

9 Drum sandere, I T to 37", tndust rial 
Circle quality for serious amateurs and profev 
13 a ii ■ »n n h. Delivers precision aandi ng per- 
formance to small & medium shops. 
Made in US A 

Page FAKK1S MACHINERY: European 
6 quality at reasonable prices. We offer 
Circle KITV woodworking machines from 

76 France, including the lowest priced 
European combination machine on 
the market — K5, Free information: 
900^72^489. 

Page FEIN POWER TOOLS: Built for 

77 tough, unique upplk-'anis. Fe j n i it- 
Circle vented the world's first power tool in 

45 189,' For Uk **e who demand more 
from their power cools than low price. 

300441-9878. 

Page FREUDiPreiruwUnerfcarbide- 

13 tipped sawblades. router bits shaper 
Circle cutters and other woodworking tools, 
75 Fruud offers a full line of anti-kickbjck 
carbide-tipped router hits. Ask for free, 
new catalog. 

Page INTERNATIONAL TOOL: Indus- 
67 trial quality power tools and uclcsso 
Circle ties at the lowest prices anywhere! 
62 Free UPS shipping on all ground or- 
ders. Bosch and Freud router bits— 
40%off listr B0Q-33S-33&1 

Page LACUNA TOOLS: Importer of fine 
18 Eu ropean woodwork i ng machi nes. 
Circle Our line includes combination ma- 

3 h chines from Hubkuid Belgium, Hand- 
sawn, shaper cutters and large sliding 
panel saws. 



Page MARLING LUMBER: Very compe- 

4 titrve prices^ full Makita line, some 
Circle select Hitachi tools, Sakura scroll 
11 saws. Fast dependable service, L'PS 
freight included on most purchases. 
800-247-7 1 ?& 

Cover PORTER CABLE: Portable electric 

4 power tools and accessories designed 
Circle and manufactured for serious amateur 

41 and professional users. 

Page R*B + INDUSTRIES: The precision 
15,17 Hawk scroll saw H versatile 4*in*i 
Circle Woodpianen durable PanelMaster 

5 door machine, American made qual- 
ity with oMur 60 years of experience, 

eo<H87*3e£a 

Page RTOBI AMERICA: Professional 
79 Umh for the tronLraeL trade, wood- 
Circle worker, serious DlYer. AP12 driver/ 
83 drill; BT 3000 10* Precision Woodcut- 
ting System. Detail Hander, Oscillating 
Spindle Sander, and 400 RPM Cordless 
Dry well/Deck Screwgun. 

Page TOOL CRIB OF THE NORTH: We 

20 stock over 1 0,000 tools! Our prices are 
Circle low; our salespeople are know ledge- 
301 able; and our service Is first-rate. Free 
shipping. 200 + page catalog: $3.00. 
SOO-35S-3096. 

Page W1LKE MACHINERY: Brldgewood 
ST> woodworking machinery. Lndust rial 

Circle quality, heavy-duty machines for seri- 
207 ous amateurs and pros. Purchase or 
lease. 41.00 for 52-page catalog. 

TURNING SUPPLIES 

Page BONHAM'S WCMHJWORK1NG SUP* 
13 PLIES: Pen kits— roller pen kits— pen- 
Circle ci I kits— walking slick kits— wooden 
102 watch kits — baseball bat pen kits, etc, 
Carba-Tee Mini-lathe, Carba-Tec 
Threadmaster. 

Page THE CONOVEU LATHE: Conovcr 

10 Wood-craft Corporation manufactures 
Circle its classically elegant lathes and 
69 thread-boxes in Northern Ohio. Heir- 
loom quality. Robust construction. 
Send for free catalog. 

Page CRAFTSUPPLIES U.S.A.: We offer 

9 the ii neat select ion of wood m mi ng 
Circle machinery, tools, chucks and acces- 
202 sorkrs. Send $2.00 fur 52-page eataltjtf, 
refunded with order. 



WOOD PARTS 

Page MIDWEST DOWEL WORKS: giial- 

ity source for dowels, turnings, spin- 
Circle dies Mid plugs in most domestic hard- 
3 woods. Also hearts, candle cups, 
wheels, axles and novelty items- 



WOODWORKING SHOWS 



Page WOODWORKING SHOWS: Shows 
P I in major e iiies including Chicago. Co- 
Circle lumbus, Detroit, Tampa, Twin Chles. 
23 Hundreds of tools* supplies, demon- 
st rations and free workshops. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

P*# FURNITURE MEDK: Woodwork- 

& mg skills can mean serious business! 
Circle Repair furniture damage on site for 
82 offices, hotels restaurants, homes. We 
provide equipment, training, territory 
and continuous support, $00-877-9933- 

Pap I WF : Over 900 exhibitors offering 

95 ihe latest ideas and technokJgy for fur- 
Circle nttiitf and custom woodworking. 
60 kitchen cabinetry, woodworking ma- 
chinery and supplies, August 36-29, 
1 994, Atlanta, G A 708-3BQ-2472, 



Page STEELM ASTER BUILDINGS, 

4 INC: Arch type steel buildings, Great 
Circle for backyard shop, lawn and garden 
106 equipment or RV storage. Easy do-ll- 
yourself construction. Buy factory 
direct and shto. 



Page WHOLESALE GLASS BROKERS: 

'7 Save money on custom fabricated 
Circle heavy glass from '/•" to 1" thick. Glass 
U tahletops, shelves, partitions are easily 

ordered from our catalog and idea 

book.o0O2S8^854. 



It keeps 

more than 

memories 

alive 



AMI-KK"AN HHAKT 

ASSOCIATION 

MRMORIAIS & TRIBUTES 



OT%3£S*£ 



1-80U-AHA-USA1 
American Heart Association ti 

This space provided as a puo>ic seo/ce. 

- 1993. American heaT Associatiar 



ft O 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUISI L ±994 



ADVERTISER INDEX 



102 

26 

61 

,14 
17 
27 



112 

59 



Advertlaer Page* Circle # 

Aaitfvark Tool Company 78 fi 

Accuus 83 — 

Mama Wood Product* 10 4 

Ai ret ream Dust Helmets 15 78 

Airuina Toot Corp, 19.21 14,51 

American Coaster 83 — 

American Workshop Series B3 — 

Attoviwd D«dgn Co. S3 — 

Ball* Ball 18 16 

Beall Tool Co, 82 — 

Blue Ox Brand Hand woods 81 — 
Bunharn '*, Woodworking 

Supplies 13 

Bosch RfflnerToob Cover 3 

Brass Fastcnera 21 

Carter Products 19 

Cascade Tools 85 

CB Lumber tntpmatkiaal ST 

Cherry tVee Toys S3 

CUph&cn's Damni 

Products. Ltd. 1 1 

CMT Tools ST 

\ . 4>nial Hardwoods, Inc. 81 — 
Computer Business 

Services 2T — 

HL Condon Co, IT 203 

Corwwr Lathe 10 <S9 

ConstaMine's AT 104 

Craftaman Indus! rial 3 42 

Craft Supplies CSA. fl 2U2 

Crrathv trail Flan* 83 - 

Crown Cfty Hardware Co. 83 — 

Delta J niernational Tool 7,&. 11 55 

Designer Furniture Plans 13 302 

Doyd Enterprises 13 1 

Dynamic Enguiet-rlng 82 — 

Econ-Abrasive* 11 38 

Enkm Import Corp. 23 32 

ExcaU bur Machine & Tool 77 4* 

ExcaUbur Machine Corp, 9 13 

Fartiu Machinery 5 76 

Fein Power Toots 77 45 

Fine Tool Journal 78 S3 

Forrest Mfg. 76 74 

Freeborn Tool 8 66 

Freud 13 75 
FuJ] Circle Woodturners 

Marketplace 82 — 

Furniture Design;* 21 303 

Furniture Medic 9 83 

Garrett Wade 17 70 

Gougcon Brothers, Inc. S3 — 

GP Designs, Inc. 82 - 
Grtnly Imports Cover 2,27 43 
HandJoggers Exotic 

Hardwoods 81 — 

JAHarchuck Sales 77 20 

Harris Tools 27 109 

Highland Hardware 11 3fi 

Horton Brasses 77 401 

Interr.at :nriikl Tool 87 62 



Advert [•cr 

IWF 

Jamestown Distributors 

JDS 

Keller Dovetail System 

Kl i tigspor Abrasives 

Latfuna Tools 

Peter Lang Co. 

Leigh Industries 

Ijberon/Star Supplier 

Lie-Nielsen Toot works 

Mac Heath Hardwood Co. 

Manny'* 

Maple 4 Couiee Woodworks 

Mapletek Engineering, Inc. 

Marling Lumber 

McFeeb-s 

Mercury Vacuum Presses 

Midwest Dowel Works 

MLCS 

Model Expo, Inc. 

Niagara Lumber * Wood 

Nyle 

Oneida Air Systems 

Pacific Standard Lumber 

Co 
Packard Woodworks 
Parker Associates AuctHm* 
Pcrfonimx 
Porter CaMe 
K.Ii. Industries 

r^l-Top-Cover 

Roudebush Co. 
RyatA America 
Saxid-Rlte MajiuJaiLurUig 
Specialty- Furniture 

Designs 
Steelmaker Buildings, Inc. 
Suflbllc Machinery 
Sup no 

Superior Plan Company 
Tool Crib of the North 
Unicom Universal Woods 
Vacuum Pressing Systems 
Van Dykes Graphics 
Vega Enterprises 
Vehit Products Company 
Village Originals, Inc. 
Wagner Electronic 

Products 
Steve Wall Lumber 
Waynes Woods Hardware 
White Chapel Brasses 
Whofcs&k Gto Brokers 
Wllte Machinery 
Wlllard Brothers 

Woodcutters 
Woodcraft Supply 
Wooden Memories 
Woodworiffirs Source 

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Woodworking Shows 



Pate Circle *> 
95 60 



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3E 









AMERICAN WOODWORKER- A JUNE 1994 



1 











Everyone likes a well-shaped leg, whether it's a sawrvand-carved 
cabriole or a scrap of metal resurrected from the town dump. 
Here are nine examples of work that stands above the crowd. 




Highboy by Lonriie Bird, Rid Grande, 
Ohio. Walnut, poplar. Dimensions: 
W: 44 \n ti Oi 24 iru H: 78 in. 

PHOTO ffTJO+fhIHAMEL 



"Tonal a Chair" 
by E stela Crtiz t 

IlLlljriJ, 

Pennsylvania, 

Maple, rush, 

palm, dye. 

Dimensions: 

W: 20Va in. 

D: 21 tn M 

H; 31V2 in< 

PHOTO BV MWH SOUPS 





A Coffee table by Jake, Ben Lomond. California- Engfish sycamore, 
ebonrzed mahogany. Dimensions: L: 45 in,, W: 20 1*1. , H: 17 in. 



Want to see your work In "Gallery?* Send color shoos or color 
transparencies tot "Gallery." American Woodworker, 33 E. Minor 
St., Emmaus, PA 18093, Please include matonoJs, dimensions, 
name of photographer, your name, address, and phone number, 
We'll pay you S3 5 If we publish your work, If you want your photos 
returned, enclose a setf-addressed stamped envelope, 



9 2 



AMERICAN WOOD WORKER 



JUNE 1994 




A 'Sculptural Buffet" by Frank Lute. Milwaukee* Wisconsin . Hern loch, maple burl, 
birch, butternut* spruce, steel, Dimensions: L: 120 in.* W: 23 1 / 2 ' n -< H: 33 in. 





A Pembroke tables by Grover Floyd II, Knoxwlie. 
Tennessee. SaLlnwood, pine, tiger ma pie r 
purpleheart, hotly, ebony, vermillion. 
Dimensions: W: 39 ln. h D: 31 in,* H: 28 in. 

PWTO ST COBOCtl KHKE 



▼ Table by John G. Hat I est 3d, Grayslake, Illinois. 

Tamo ash, wafnut. purple he art, radiator fins, aircraft cable. 
Dimensions: L: 82 in.. W: 32 in.* Hi 30 in. 





A "Banquet" by Kit Wilson, San Marcos. California, 
Cocoboio, dyed maple. Dimensions: L: 160 In.. 
W: 54 in.. H: 30 in. 

(WO BV Wit GUtSOh 



Tabfe by 
Grover Floyd II, 

Knoxvi|le< 

Tennessee. 

Quilted maple. 

oirch plywood. 

boxwood, 

hoiry, ebony. 

Dimensions: 

W: 22 in.. 

D: lain.. 

H: 29 in. 

PHOTO BT GORDON t*ODOE 




AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



I U H E 199 4 



9 3 




CALIFORNIA 



EXHIBITION 
Mendocino: May 14 June 6. College of the 
Redwoods Fine Woodworking Program 1 * Annual 
Student Ejhibwon. High right Gallery, 45062 Main St. 
(707* 937-3132, 

LECTURES 
San Francisco; May 10, Frame Design In America, 
1820 1920. June 14. Classical Taste in America. 

1300- 1540. Trustee' Si Auditorium. M.H, de Young 

Museum, Golden Gate Park. (415) 456-8177. 

WORKSHOPS 
Mendoclrw; May 7-9. Making Stools and Benches. 
May 14-15, Basic Biacksmithing. May 21-22. More 
Foolrnafcing for the Woodworker. May 23-27. Chair 
From a Tree, June 4-6. Make a Pole Lathe. All taught 
by Don Weber. (707)937 0920. 



COLORADO 



SYMPOSIUM 
Fort Collin*; June 23-25. American Association of 
Woodturners Eighth National Symposium. Colorado 
State University. (612) 484-9094, 



CONNECTICUT 



EXHIBITIONS 
New Canaan: Through May 10; "Andre* Pekio III: 
Architect/ Joiner." Curtis Gallery. New Canaan 
Library, 151 Main SL [203] 966-S133. 
New London; Through May 29. 'Child's Play: 
Fu*n r.urrj for Chi drcn " Lvnjn AN'. 1 ". Jr* Mj^tuTi. 245 
Williams St. (203) 443-2545. 

SHOW 
Hartford: June 10-12. Wadswortn Atheneum Craft 
Snow, 800 Mam St, (203 ) S23-2666. 



DELAWARE 



EXHIBITIONS 
Wilmington; June 10-Septembar 4. 'Common 
Ground/Uncommon Vision: The Michael and Julie 
Hall Collection of American Folk Art.' Delaware Art 
Museum, 2301 Kentmere Pkwy, (302 ) 5719590. 
Yorklyn: Through May 28 < "Dennis Elliott: Turned 
wood Sculptures." Sole show, Creations Gallery, 
Garrett snurr mmis, 2890 creek Rd, {302 1 234-2350. 



IOWA 



SHOW 
Davenport: June 23-26, International Woodcarvers 

Congress. Open and free to public. Putnam Museum, 

1717 W. 12th SL (3l^| 359^9684. 



KENTUCKY 



WORKSHOPS 
Pleasant Hill: J una 24-25. 2626 and 26-27. Shaker 
Oval Boxes: John Wilson. Shaker Village. 3501 
Lexington Rd. [606| 734-5411. 



MAINE 



CLASS 
Dear lale: June 6-1T. Woodworking, Planning and 
Creative Vision' Micftael Hurwilr. Haystack Mountain 
School o» Crafts. <2Q7) 34&2306. 
WORKSHOPS 
Rockland: June 6-1T. Basic Woodworking Peter Hem 
and Ship Benson. Juna 20-July 1. Basic 
Woodworking; Peter Horn and John McAlevey. Center 
for Furniture Craftsmanship. (207) 594-5611. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



SHOW 
Wast Springfield: Juna 17-19. American Craft 
Council Craft Fair, Eastern States Exposition* 1305 
Memorial Awe. (800) 636-3470. 

WORKSHOPS 
Caathampton: May JL Japanese Woodworking Tools: 
Their Use. Care and Spint. May 7-fl. Turning Wooden 
Vessels: The Inside Story, May 14. Chair Design and 
Construction. May 22, The Art and Science of wood 
Joinery. June 12- The Art of Finishing Fine Furniture, 
1413} 527-8480. 



Washington: May 23-27. Finish Carpentry, Jam 2a 
24. Cab. nolmow ng. Juna 27-Jury 1. Timber Framing. 
Hearrwood Owner-Builder School (413} 6236677, 
Williamsburg: May 14-16. The Adirondack Chair: 
Josh Marker June 26- Jury 16, High School Summer 
Program; Wood Sculpture and Furniture Design. 
Horizons Craft Program. (413) 66&O3O0. 



MICHIGAN 



WORKSHOP 
Holland: June 10-11. Shaker Oval Boxes: John 
Wilson. Sf-aker Messenger. |61G) 39*4588. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



MEETING 
Wilton: May 21. Guild of New Hampshire 
Woodworkers meeung h and damortstnaljon of veneer' 
rng techniques by Jere Osgood. (603) 654-2960. 

SHOW 
Canterbury: May 7- Wood Day at Shaker Village- 
Turning, cab i no (making, boatbuilding and timber- 
frame restoration demonstrations.; antique tool deal- 
ers; craft displays. Canterbury Shaker Village, 288 
Shaker Rd. (GQ3 P 783-9511. 



NEW YORK 



SHOWS 
Hamburg: May IS. 17th Annual Wooocarvlng Show. 
Sponsored by Southtown* Woodcarvers- Erie County 
Fairgrounds, (716) 937-322B. 

Hew York City: May 16-lB, International 
Contemporary Furniture Fair. Jacob K. Javits 
Convention Center. 36th St. and lnh Ave. (BOO) 
272-7469. 

Tarrytown: Mar 13-15. Crafti Fair at Lyhdhurat. 
Lyndhursl Estate. 635 S. Broadway. (9i4| 679-7277. 

WORKSHOPS 
Warwick: May 28. Sharpening Hand Saws. May 26- 
27. Planecraft. June 2-3. lStft-Century Miliwork. June 
4. Steambendin£. June 9-10. Basic Sharpening. June 
UL Sharpening Hand Saws, June 13-14, Planecraft. 
June 15-16. Carving for Chairmakers. June 17-18. 
Culling Dovetaits, June 23-25, Making a Molding 
Plane. June 30 July 2. Making a Bench Plane. All 
taught by Mario Rodriguez. Special packages also 
available. Warwick Country Workshops, 1 East RwJgc 
Rd, {914} 9666636. 



NORTH CAROLINA 



SHOW 
Winston-Salem: May 13-JLG+ the Country Peddler 
Show. Dine Classic Fairgrounds, 421 W. 27th SL 
(B101 423*367, 

WORKSHOPS 
Braeetown: May B-14. Making a Mountain Dulcimer: 
Bill Smith. May 16-21. Turnjng Wood for Useful 
Objects of Art; Fred Yaxtey jr, Basic Carving: "Red* 
Ramey. May 22-28. Woodturnlna/Tooirnaking; Darren 
L Rhudy. June 5-11. carving Holiday Figures: Jack 
Phillips. June 12-18, Turning Wood for Useful Objects 
of Art: Fred Yaxley Jr. June 19-25. Basic Woe- J Corvirp 
John Hlllyer. June 26-Jtily 2. Turned Bowls and 
Vessels: Marcus Collier, Carving a St. Francis Figure: 
Helen Gibson. Campbell Folk School. {704 ) 837-2775. 
Marshall: June 20-25. Welsh $pind|eback 
Chalrmahung,: Don Weber. June 27- July 2. Ladderback 
Chaimnaking: Drew Langsner. Country Workshops. 
704} 6562280. 

Penland: May 30-Jurw 10. Furniture: Techniques. 
Design and Construction: Tagu Frid, Skip Johnson 
and Doug Sigjer. June* 27-Jufy 8. Carving for Furniture 
and Sculpture: Bob Trotman. Penland School of 
Crafts. (704) 765-2359. 



OHIO 



SHOW 
Columbus: June 3-6. American Craft. Council Craft 
Fair. Columbus Convention Center, 400 North High 
St. (600) 636-3470. 



OREGON 



SHOW 
Portland: June lT-lt. The View From Our Window: 
21st Annual Western Woodcarvers Association Show. 
At the World Forestry Center, Write World Forestry 
Center. 4033 SW Canyon Rd. p Portland. 97223. 



PENNSYLVANIA 



CAU FOR ENTRIES 
Paoll: Through luly 15. nrst Annual Wharton Esnerlch 
Museum Woodworking Competition/Exhibition. 
Seeking imaginative birdhouse designs for upcoming 
competition in September. Slides and applications, 
due by above date. For more information, call: 
Wharton Eaherick Museum, (610} 6445622, 

EXHIBITION 
Philadelphia: Through May 21. 'Howard We mar: 
Solo Exhibition of Contemporary Furniture.' 
Snyderman Gallery, 303 Cherry St. [215) 236-9576. 

WORKSHOPS 
Yerite May 14-16. Period Restoration and Touch Up: 
Eli Rios. May 21-22. lSlhCentury Joinery: Eugene 
Landon. June 18-19. Wood Finishing: Bob FJexner. 
Okie Mill Cabinet Shoppe. (717) 755-8884. 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



SHOW 
Graenvllla: May 20-22, The Country Peddler Show. 
Palmetto E*po Center, Exposition Ave, (616) 423- 
3367. 



TENNESSEE 



EXHIBITION 
Gatllnburg: Through May 14. 'Myths: New Form. 
New Function,* a national juried exhibition of art- 
works about myth* and contemporary society. 
Arruwmont School of Arts and Crafts. 556 Parkway 
St (615) 436-5660. 

WORKSHOPS 
Smhhville: Juna 6-10. The Art of Woodiurnirg: John 
Jordan. Bas Relief Woodcarvmg; Paul Pitts. June 13- 
17. Windsor Ctiairmakmg; Paul Pitts, Appalachian 
Center for Crafts, (615) 597*801. 



VIRGINIA 



EXHIBITION 
Williamsburg: Through June 1995. 'Tools: Working 
Wood in 18th Century America/ DeWift Wallace 
Decorative Arts Gallery. (600) 447-8679, or (804) 
220-7724. 



WASHINGTON 



SEMINAR 
Pert Towntend; June 20-25. Small Seal 
Construction, Northwest School of Wooden 
l3oatbui1diiig, (206) 3S&4&46, 



CANADA 



WORKSHOPS 
Blenheim, Ontario: May 20-21. Shaker Oval Bo*es: 
John Wilson. The Tolc Shed, 26 Talbot St. W. (519) 
6765121. 

HaJinu, Nova Scotia: May 13-14 and 14-lft, Shaker 
Oval Boxes: John Wilson, Atlantic Woodworkers. 
(902) 425-6422. 



EUROPE 



Through July 2S. * George Frank's Homecoming.' 

>otn famous fvniaher George Frank from October 3 to 
13 tor a tour ot woodworking atelier* and museum 
restoration facilities in Paris, the Loire Valley, end 
London. Reservations accepted through July 25. 
Contact: Horizon Travel. (800) 352-1036. 

'Calendar* listing la free and restricted to woodwork- 
ing workshops, seminars, trade show, etc. Please 
Include address of event and a contact phone num- 
ber. Send listing at least two months prior to date of 
event to: "Calendar.* Amebic** woodworker, 33 E. 
Minor SL. Emmaus, PA 18D9B. 



94 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1994 



Discover a World of Solutions 

IWF '94-Atlanta 







THE GLOBAL MAR 

Technology 1 • Supplies • Processes • Solutions 



vL 

Sponsored by: American Furniture Manufacturers Association 

Wood Machinery Manufacturers of America 

Woodworking Machinery Importers Association 




International Woodworking Machinery and Furniture Supply Fair 



» "El 



IWF 



August 25-28, 1994 



iniH'^* : HH=[M N 5m Georgia World Congress Center 




Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A. 



Experience the Global Market- 
place that offers specific answers to 
your manufacturing challenges. 
IWF '94 puts woodworkingtfumiture/ 
upholstery professionals face-to- 
face with the latest machine tech- 
nology, supplies, materials and 
manufacturing processes, See dem- 
onstrations of the latest equipment 
and supplies from more than 1 ,000 
exhibiting companies— all under one 
roof! You can't afford to miss the 
LARGEST International Wood- 
working Machinery and Furniture 
Supply Fair in the Western Hemi- 
sphere. 

Explore 600,000 not square feet 
(55,800 square meters) of exhibit 
space PACKED with solutions. More 
than 38,000 visitors will attend. If 
you're looking for solutions to re* 
main competitive in the Global Mar- 
ketplace, you must attend IWF '94. 

For more information on the larg- 
est single market for furniture, cus- 
tom woodworking, upholstery and 
supplies, architectural woodwork, 
kitchen cabinetry, and woodworking 
machinery and supplies, fill out and 
mall or fax this coupon today to: 

Reed Exhibition Companies 

1350 East Touhy Avenue 

Des Raines, IL 60017-5060 U.S.A. 

Phone (70S) 299-931 1 

Fax (708) 635-1571 

Registration deadline for IWF '94 la 
August 1, 19B4. No ons admitted 
under 1ft yaar* of *ge, 



i YES, I would like to receive information on. 
I Name 

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.attending,. 



.exhibiting at IWF '94. 



"1 



Company 



Street Address 
State 



City. 



Postal Code 



Country 



I Telephone 
I 



FAX No., 



Kl 



AMERICAN WOODWORKER 



JUNE 1904 



SB 





DOUBLE-DUTY SAWHORSES 



By Ellis Walentine 



Sawhorses are among the most 
useful shop accessories, and this 
design is one of the nicest we've 
seen, Sturdy yet easy to stow away 



when not in use, a pair will hold a 
sizeable stack of lumber or a cabinet 
chassis— wherever you want it and 
without tying up valuable bench 




Notch V* In. de*p 

by2V4in,wW# t 

bothskks. 

Notch v2 In* deep 
by iVi In. wide. 






THROUGH 
TENON WITH 



%4T.x2W. 
iiV4L 




FOOT 
lV4x3i 16 



V4T.«iV4W.«lL CLAMPBEAM 

2V4X2V4 






Rout Win. chamfers on 
■II edge* after assembly. 



STRETCHER 
1 V4 1 3 1 30 




13-4x3*32 




TENON 
¥4T.*2W,x2L 





CLAMP BEAM CONSTRUCTION 
Notch w in. deep. 



--&— r-e — -& — *— -e e © — * 



*■ * 



1 

Drill l-in.-dta. holes on centerline, 

verylne spacing to suit application, 
than rip into two clamp beams. 



space. And, when they're used with 
notched beams like the one shown 
here, the horses provide a solid bed 
for a clamping nick. 

You can make the horses from any 
hardwood you have handy, For maxi- 
mum rigidity, the mortise-and-tcnon 
joints at die bottom of the legs should 
be as tight as possible. 

Make the clamping beams in pairs 
is shown in the drawing using 
poplar or another utility hardwood. 
To create the semicircular notches 
for your pipe clamps, drill Hn + -dia. 
holes 6 in, apart on the centcrlincs of 
your planks, beginning about 3 In. 
from one end. (Note: If you T ll be glu- 
ing many different-height door 
frames, space the holes closer togeth- 
er— *or at random imervals^so you'll 
always be able to position clamps at 
each stilc-and-rail joint.) 

Kipping the planks down the mid- 
dle creates your pairs of beams, 
although you'll need to clean up the 
sawn surfaces on the jointer. Finally, 
chamfer the edges and drill a hole 
through one end of each beam, so 
you can hang it on a nail when it's 
not in use. 

For a durable, glue-resistant finish 
on both horses and beams, brush on a 
coat of varnish or polyurcthanc. A fol- 
low-up coat of paste wax will make it 
easier to clean off dried 
glue after each use. A 




Do you harv a 
favorite stop fixture 

you 'd tike to 

share? Send a* 

drawing or sketch 

with a full explana- 
tion to: American 

Woodworker, 33 E, 

Minor St., Emmaus, FA 18098. 
If we publish your "Shop Solution* 
we'll send you this Forrest 8*in, dado 
set, worth $32L 







AMERICAN WOODWORKER A JUNE 1004 




Power like this makes other drills seem boring. 

Bosch drills are real eye-openers. They were recently rated #1 and #2 
by a national consumer magazine. And the Bosch BGIGO 3/8" variable speed 
reversing drill is a good example why- 
Nothing else in its class can match its powerful 4 + 8 amp motor. Which 
means you can easily tackle demanding jobs like driving holesaws and flat- 
blade bits. Plus, with its to l t 100 R1*M chuck speed, you'll never lack Tor torque. 
To keep you working comfortably, there's a contoured grip and large 
trigger. And to keep the BGlOfl working for years, it's built with fully hardened, cut-steel gears. 

There *s aiso the added life insurance of a one year warranty, 
90 day satisfaction guarantee and one year service protection plan, /JHfi lO^C H 

For drilling power that'll get you all worked up, step up to » o « t ■ ? o o l i 

the Bosch EG'100. ehqweered for performance" 




CtRH S-H FWr TnoJ Ownpanx i.m W T*mwm Arc,. Ok^, IL ttibto 

CfKiZ ho 5a O*«00yCT r#0fi*#fl-icw raw